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By Sloane Brown | December 16, 2001
Elvis Presley was alive, well and everywhere at the "Eighth Night of 100 Elvises." In one corner, a young Elvis in a peg-legged dark suit. In another, an older Elvis Presley in a dazzling red and white embroidered and rhinestoned jumpsuit. Or how about those five female line-dancing Elvis Presleys in matching high-collared black jumpsuits and pompadour wigs? Those were just some of the almost 50 individual artists and bands who performed Elvis songs on two stages at Baltimore's Lithuanian Hall.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Dr. Robert E. Cooke, a retired Johns Hopkins pediatrician-in-chief who was a founder of the Head Start children's program and a presidential medical adviser, died of heart disease Feb. 2 at his Oak Bluffs home on Martha's Vineyard, Mass. The former North Roland Park resident was 93. "We have lost a true visionary, whose acumen, passion and dedication have influenced generations of pediatricians and changed the lives of millions of children," said Dr. Paul B. Rothman, dean of the medical faculty and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
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NEWS
February 1, 2005
Brett D.L. Self, an eighth-grader at Oakland Mills Middle School, had his bar mitzvah Nov. 13 at Temple Isaiah in Fulton. Afterward, he and about 100 family members and friends celebrated at That's Amore on Little Patuxent Parkway. The centerpiece on each table was homemade. "We made Build-A-Bears, from the store at the mall, he and his sister and I, and we made them into centerpieces," said Brett's mother, Ellynn Self. "We covered a piece of Styrofoam to make a base, and then we tied balloons to the bears and set them in the middle of the table."
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Johns Hopkins researchers are well on their way to building a digital library of children's brain images, which they say eventually will give doctors around the world access to a free Google-like search engine that could help diagnose and treat pediatric neurological disorders. The goal is for any doctor to be able to upload a patient's MRI scan, then wait for the computer to spit out results as it searches for images in the databank with similar patterns and known diagnoses. The databank, which has 7,000 brain images of Hopkins patients and counting, should be publicly available in three years, said Dr. Thierry Huisman, a professor of radiology, neurology and pediatrics and the director of pediatric radiology and neuroradiology at the Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | May 12, 2008
Ali Barbieri occupies just a sliver of her grown-up bed at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, her 5-month-old legs suspended in a miniature traction rig that holds in place the hips she dislocated at birth. Most days Ali's mother, Natalia, sits with her all day, caressing her, distracting her with the toys that share her bed, trying to introduce her to solid foods. Barbieri knows just how well her daughter is sleeping, eating and feeling. So it makes sense to involve her in Ali's care - and to have her on hand when the doctors do their early-morning rounds.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
Face it, faithful Candid Closet readers, Dr. George Dover, director of Johns Hopkins Children's Center, has better things to worry about than his clothes. He says even his wife Barbara yawns at the sight of his standard wear.So what's this with the ties? Ever since Hopkins and Jos. A. Banks Clothiers produced the Miracle Collection, a line of men's neckwear featuring designs based on the molecular structure of important pediatric medications, Dover has been very, very big on his ties. The collection was launched for the fourth year yesterday with a fashion show that included the dapper Dr. Dover.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1996
They walk with a staggering gait, feet spread and torsos swaying as if someone had spun them into a state of dizziness. First comes a diagnosis of cerebral palsy, a label that seems right until other puzzling symptoms appear.In the first few years of life, the children develop abnormal skin pigmentations, lung infections and slurred speech. They have trouble tracking objects with their eyes. And in many cases, they are beset by aggressive cancers.A confusing journey through specialists eventually brings parents to a correct diagnosis: ataxia telangiectasia (tel-AN-jek-TAY-sha)
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | May 10, 1998
Polly Hesterberg begins each day in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit looking for adults in distress. With a mother's instinct for caring - and a nurse's attention to detail - she will check each room and bed for the tell-tale signs.A tearful mother has left her infant's bedside when some doctors approached. Did they unfairly push her out?The mom down the hall speaks only Turkish. Better call in a translator to make sure she understands what's happening to her son.The mother one door down was upset that her daughter was awakened so often during the night for tests.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | December 2, 1990
Jessica Zoe Kalendek, a straight-A student at Bel Air Middle School, doesn't like to dwell on the surgery she had at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore last year.But the 14-year-old has one pleasant memory to associate with her stay at the acute care hospital for children -- a festive picture of a hearth decked out for Christmas that she drew while she was a patient. The cards are sold to raise money for the Children's Center.The drawing shows four green stockings hung by a fireplace and has a border of ribbons and jingle bells.
NEWS
By IVAN PENN and IVAN PENN,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
A 6-year-old boy struck by a car in front of the Long Reach Shopping Center last week was in serious but stable condition yesterday at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.Terrell Fields of the 8700 block of Airy Brink Lane in Long Reach village was crossing Tamar Drive from the village shopping center about 5:25 p.m. Jan. 4 when he walked into the path of a 1987 Honda driven by Trevor Wine, 23, of the 8300 block of Tamar Drive, police said.Mr. Wine, who was traveling south on Tamar, was not injured or charged.
HEALTH
By Brian Melton, For The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Simply referring to Maria Trent, M.D., as a pediatrician is a bit like calling Barack Obama an executive. The Johns Hopkins Children's Center doctor's continuing achievements as a researcher, clinician, professor and advocate for adolescent health education brought her to the attention of Ebony magazine's editorial board, which named her in its December issue as one of the nation's 100 most influential African-Americans for 2013. She and her fellow honorees - including Kerry Washington, Magic Johnson, Harry Belafonte, Marian Wright Edelman and the aforementioned executive - were celebrated this month at New York's Lincoln Center.
EXPLORE
March 22, 2013
During the Tower Federal Credit Union's annual Have A Heart fundraiser in February, employees and members raised $32,000 to help care for critically ill children receiving treatment at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, in Baltimore. TFCU members and employees also held raffles and sales to add to the fundraising effort. Since 1998, Tower, which is headquartered in Laurel, has raised more than $475,000 for the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, which is a member hospital of the Children's Miracle Network, an organization dedicated to helping raise fund for 170 children's hospital throughout North America.
EXPLORE
By Jon Meoli | December 6, 2012
When it comes to holiday shopping for her father, Lilah Sidle has developed the perfect angle. Not only can she come through with the tried and true necktie, but for the past two years, the 11-year-old's father and grandfather have received Jos. A Bank ties that the young Cockeysville resident has designed herself. This year, through a partnership with the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Lilah has yet another tie in her portfolio - and maybe, just maybe, in her dad's closet come late December.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Years ago, Baltimore Sports & Social Club owner Mike Cray talked with his friend Patrick "Scunny" McCusker about a Santa-themed bar crawl. "It saddens me that we never got around to 'make it happen,'" Cray wrote on the BSSC website. In a way, that will change Saturday, when the first "Scunny Santa Crawl" takes place from 1 p.m.-9 p.m. at O'Donnell Square in Canton. McCusker, who died at age 49 on Aug. 24 in Salisbury after he was struck by a bus in Ocean City, will not be there physically, but his presence and spirit will most likely be felt and celebrated as if he were.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Ten people were injured when an MTA bus collided with a car in Glen Burnie on Saturday night, according to Anne Arundel County fire officials. Responders were dispatched to the scene at Crain Highway and 8th Avenue at 9:45 p.m., officials said. One child was taken to Johns Hopkins Children's Center, and another was transported to Baltimore Washington Medical Center. Eight people involved in the crash were taken to Harbor Hospital. No further details were immediately available.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 13, 2011
Dr. James Patrick Connaughton, a psychiatrist who was the founder and first director of what became the Johns Hopkins Children and Adolescent Mental Health Center, died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at his Cloisters home in the Woodbrook neighborhood of Baltimore County. He was 80. The son of a government worker and a shopkeeper, Dr. Connaughton was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland. After graduating from Rockwell College, a Tipperary boarding school, he entered University College in Dublin, where he earned his medical degree in 1956.
NEWS
March 29, 2001
A Columbia teen-ager has been selected to represent Johns Hopkins Children's Center during a national broadcast. Scott Summe, 16, is one of 50 children from around the country selected as part of the Children's Miracle Network's Champions Across American Program. As part of the program, Scott and his family will visit Washington and Orlando, Fla. Born with Crouzon syndrome, an inherited condition that causes skull bones to fuse before birth, Scott has undergone 21 surgeries. He speaks at local elementary schools about his condition and recently completed a cross-country race.
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