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NEWS
December 24, 1999
If ringing in the new usually means ringing in your ears, a free set of earplugs might lessen the risk of permanent hearing loss.The Johns Hopkins Center for Hearing and Balance is mailing free earplugs to anyone who wants them.Music concerts and dance parties can produce sounds as high as 120 decibels. Under such conditions, doctors warn, hearing damage can occur in as little as seven to 10 minutes. If ringing persists in the ears after such occasions, doctors say, that indicates minute hair cells in the inner ear, which transmit sounds to the brain, might be dying.
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HEALTH
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
More than 1,000 people rode bicycles 150 miles - in the rain, for part of the way - this weekend to raise $2.6 million for cancer research at Johns Hopkins. The funds from the inaugural Ride to Conquer Cancer in Washington, D.C. on Saturday will support the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington and Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. Organizers said the money raised will allow researchers to personalize cancer treatment and screening methods for each patient.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
While Dr. Donald A. Henderson, the man who led the worldwide campaign against smallpox, taped an interview yesterday with the BBC and fielded calls from countless newspapers, Dr. Tara O'Toole testified before the House Intelligence Committee. Reporters, doctors, hospital officials and worried citizens have been calling for days, and the e-mails keep pouring in. Everyone, it seems, is thinking about bioterrorism, and the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies is a place with answers.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Nothing could save Albert P. "Skip" Viragh Jr. from pancreatic cancer, but a $65 million gift from his foundation will help other patients suffering from that and other deadly cancers. The money will be used to help pay for construction of a patient care building at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, the medical institution announced Tuesday. The new building will bear the name of Viragh, an innovative Maryland mutual fund investor who died from pancreatic cancer in 2003 at age 62 after receiving treatment at Johns Hopkins.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
Decked out in the blue and white skin-tight shorts that will be her primary clothing for the next two months, Kaylin Beck strapped on her helmet, mounted her bicycle and set off yesterday from the Inner Harbor with 26 other students on a cross-country ride to raise money for cancer patients. Never having ridden more than 15 miles at a time, the Johns Hopkins University sophomore from New York City admitted to moments of trepidation as she envisioned the heat and the hills that awaited her. Beck, however, was able to draw strength from the success of others.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 26, 2002
COVENTRY, England - In this old manufacturing city that helped forge Britain's auto and airplane industries, Warwick University is embarking on a project to broaden the minds of Britain's brightest kids by borrowing an idea from Baltimore. England's National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth has been unveiled, with Warwick University administrators and British government officials putting out an all-call for England's elite students ages 11 to 16. The program to enrich talented kids, many of whom might otherwise fall through the cracks, is modeled on the Center for Talented Youth at the Johns Hopkins University.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | May 16, 1992
Borrowing a page from the hospitality industry, Johns Hopkins Hospital opens a new $140 million outpatient center Monday as much designed to provide customer satisfaction as medical care.The new one-stop center aims to woo patients attracted by the Hopkins name but put off by the prospect of parking problems, long waits, a massive complex and red tape.The eight-story outpatient center at 601 N. Caroline St., one of the largest in the Northeast, is an effort by Hopkins to capture a significant share of what it sees as the main area of growth in medicine over the next decade.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 2, 2001
Dr. Donald A. Henderson, founder of the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies, was named yesterday to oversee the federal government's response to public health emergencies, including the recent anthrax attacks. His appointment as director of the newly created Office of Public Health Preparedness was announced yesterday by Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson. "Dr. Henderson brings a lifetime of preparation for the demands of this job, and we are fortunate to have him join the department on a full-time basis," Thompson said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 6, 2012
Urban farming guru Will Allen will be in B'more Wednesday (3/7) to speak about sustainable agriculture and the challenges ahead.  Allen, son of a sharecropper and a former professional basketball player with the Baltimore Bullets (now the Wizards), is founder and CEO of Growing Power  Inc., a farm and community food center in Milwaukee.  His efforts have earned him numerous awards and recognition, including a MacArthur "genius" grant in 2008. His lecture and signing of a new book, On the Nature of Food , will be at 12:15 p.m. at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St.  His appearance is sponsored by Hopkins' Center for a Livable Future .
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 10, 2003
The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine has received a four-year, $24 million grant to establish a center for the study of sudden cardiac death, school officials said yesterday. The grant was made by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, a Las Vegas-based philanthropy founded in 1954 by the media entrepreneur for whom it is named. At the time of his death in 1993, Reynolds owned 75 newspapers as well as cable television and outdoor advertising companies. The Hopkins center will pursue therapies that include using stem cells to prevent sudden deaths and use modern imaging techniques to identify the abnormalities that put people at risk.
HEALTH
By Brian Melton, For The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Simply referring to Maria Trent, M.D., as a pediatrician is a bit like calling Barack Obama an executive. The Johns Hopkins Children's Center doctor's continuing achievements as a researcher, clinician, professor and advocate for adolescent health education brought her to the attention of Ebony magazine's editorial board, which named her in its December issue as one of the nation's 100 most influential African-Americans for 2013. She and her fellow honorees - including Kerry Washington, Magic Johnson, Harry Belafonte, Marian Wright Edelman and the aforementioned executive - were celebrated this month at New York's Lincoln Center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Edward L. "Mac" McDill, former chairman of the Johns Hopkins University's sociology department who was also the founding director of the Hopkins Center for Social Organization of Schools, died April 25 of prostate cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Mays Chapel resident was 82. "Mac was a friend and a mentor. He was the pillar of the department and held it together when we went through some pretty rough times," said Karl Alexander, who succeeded Dr. McDill as department chair.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Zoning laws have become a powerful way to reduce the number of liquor stores in cities, but too few government officials use them, Johns Hopkins University public health researchers said in a new report. Researchers from the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have created a guide to advise governments of the regulatory power they have to combat alcohol abuse. They hope the report, published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease, will bring more attention to the issue.
EXPLORE
March 22, 2013
During the Tower Federal Credit Union's annual Have A Heart fundraiser in February, employees and members raised $32,000 to help care for critically ill children receiving treatment at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, in Baltimore. TFCU members and employees also held raffles and sales to add to the fundraising effort. Since 1998, Tower, which is headquartered in Laurel, has raised more than $475,000 for the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, which is a member hospital of the Children's Miracle Network, an organization dedicated to helping raise fund for 170 children's hospital throughout North America.
EXPLORE
By Jon Meoli | December 6, 2012
When it comes to holiday shopping for her father, Lilah Sidle has developed the perfect angle. Not only can she come through with the tried and true necktie, but for the past two years, the 11-year-old's father and grandfather have received Jos. A Bank ties that the young Cockeysville resident has designed herself. This year, through a partnership with the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Lilah has yet another tie in her portfolio - and maybe, just maybe, in her dad's closet come late December.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Ten people were injured when an MTA bus collided with a car in Glen Burnie on Saturday night, according to Anne Arundel County fire officials. Responders were dispatched to the scene at Crain Highway and 8th Avenue at 9:45 p.m., officials said. One child was taken to Johns Hopkins Children's Center, and another was transported to Baltimore Washington Medical Center. Eight people involved in the crash were taken to Harbor Hospital. No further details were immediately available.
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin | May 30, 1993
William G. Durden delivers 'Smart Kids' and shows how they 0) managed to get that wayDr. William G. Durden has been waiting like an expectant father for the delivery of his "Smart Kids."That's the name of his new non-fiction book, his second as director of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University."I'm very excited about it," he says. "It could be any day now."Dr. Durden, 43, has master's and Ph.D. degrees from Hopkins, and since 1981 has been director of the center, which tries to identify academically talented youngsters and provides summer programs for them.
NEWS
By Malena Amusa and Amy Segreti and Malena Amusa and Amy Segreti,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
About 34,000 Baltimore children are injured in home and traffic accidents and require medical attention each year -- a figure that has sparked Johns Hopkins health officials to launch a mobile safety center to illustrate potential hazards and preventative measures. The center is mounted on a 40-foot trailer, and its interior simulates a typical house with a kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and stairway. It will be staffed by instructors from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health and the city Fire Department.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 6, 2012
Urban farming guru Will Allen will be in B'more Wednesday (3/7) to speak about sustainable agriculture and the challenges ahead.  Allen, son of a sharecropper and a former professional basketball player with the Baltimore Bullets (now the Wizards), is founder and CEO of Growing Power  Inc., a farm and community food center in Milwaukee.  His efforts have earned him numerous awards and recognition, including a MacArthur "genius" grant in 2008. His lecture and signing of a new book, On the Nature of Food , will be at 12:15 p.m. at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St.  His appearance is sponsored by Hopkins' Center for a Livable Future .
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