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NEWS
July 27, 2007
FERRELL SECAKUKU, 69 Former Hopi leader Former Hopi Chairman Ferrell Secakuku, who helped resolve a longtime land dispute between his tribe and the Navajo Nation, has died. Mr. Secakuku, who disclosed this month that he had been diagnosed with cancer, had been in hospice care. He died Wednesday at a friend's home in Flagstaff, Ariz., said his daughter, Kim Secakuku. Born in the Village of Sipaulovi, Mr. Secakuku served as chairman of the Hopi Tribe from 1994 to 1997. While in office, he facilitated the negotiation of the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement, which was worked out after a federal judge in 1991 ordered the two tribes to reach an agreement over land they had been quarreling over since the 1800s.
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NEWS
July 27, 2007
FERRELL SECAKUKU, 69 Former Hopi leader Former Hopi Chairman Ferrell Secakuku, who helped resolve a longtime land dispute between his tribe and the Navajo Nation, has died. Mr. Secakuku, who disclosed this month that he had been diagnosed with cancer, had been in hospice care. He died Wednesday at a friend's home in Flagstaff, Ariz., said his daughter, Kim Secakuku. Born in the Village of Sipaulovi, Mr. Secakuku served as chairman of the Hopi Tribe from 1994 to 1997. While in office, he facilitated the negotiation of the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement, which was worked out after a federal judge in 1991 ordered the two tribes to reach an agreement over land they had been quarreling over since the 1800s.
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NEWS
October 2, 1995
FireMount Airy: Mount Airy responded to a brush fire in the 100 block of N. Towne Court at 10:04 p.m. Thursday. Units were out 26 minutes.Taylorsville: Winfield engines responded to investigate a report of a fire alarm sounding in a building on Hopi Court at 10:10 a.m. Thursday. Units were out 30 minutes.Winfield: Winfield engines responded to an auto fire on West Old Liberty Road at 11:27 a.m. Thursday. Units were out 30 minutes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 2001
Among a flood of last-minute actions by the Clinton administration late last week was a proposal to allow the Hopi Indians to gather hatchling golden eagles from nests at a national monument in Arizona for an ancient sacrificial ritual. A draft rule allowing the practice, which is opposed by many animal protection and environmental groups, had been on hold for months while lawyers at the Department of the Interior weighed laws protecting Indian religious freedoms and those protecting parks and birds of prey.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 1999
DENVER -- Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt favors a policy change that would allow members of the Hopi tribe to remove golden eagles from a national monument in northern Arizona, a move that critics fear could open the door to hunting in national parks.The issue at the Wupatki National Monument near Flagstaff, Ariz., has been percolating since summer, when the Hopi requested permission to take eaglets for use in a religious ceremony. Taking or hunting of animals in national parks is prohibited, but Babbitt said in an interview that he favors allowing an exception in this case.
NEWS
By Tillie Friedenberg | May 4, 1991
Trudging heat-red Hopi mesasPanting, you and I, old lover,Relishing these sandy momentsWalking bone hard plateau land.Sun's rays meet the mesa's edgesTurquoise skies surpass gem bluenessAncient shadows of Kachinascast patina'd spirit spells.Butterfly Kachina DancerShe with clay beads on her foreheadTwirls enticements to Rain SpiritBlack Bear quells all tribal frights.Souvenirs of driftwood god-dollsTrimmed with feathers, fur ruffed neck rings:Blind Eyed Traveler, strong for walkingCarries Weak Legs on his back.
FEATURES
By M. R. Montgomery and M. R. Montgomery,Boston Globe | July 14, 1994
This modest, wise, small book would perhaps escape attention were it not for the incredible boom in tourism to the remote Four Corners territory of the Southwest. So be it: If the lost time and lost land described in this autobiographical essay have been irrevocably changed by modernity and motor vehicles, tourism and telephones, Edward T. Hall's memoir of a time and space lost forever will at least be read by people who have already acquired a taste for Navajo and Hopi country.For tourists who have gotten their hands on the excellent California Automobile Association travel map of the southwest Indian country, "West of the Thirties," will provide an unusual additional guide, an authentic example of that rarest commodity -- truth about how it was. Mr. Hall, before beginning a long career in anthropology (pioneering the field of nonverbal communication)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 2001
Among a flood of last-minute actions by the Clinton administration late last week was a proposal to allow the Hopi Indians to gather hatchling golden eagles from nests at a national monument in Arizona for an ancient sacrificial ritual. A draft rule allowing the practice, which is opposed by many animal protection and environmental groups, had been on hold for months while lawyers at the Department of the Interior weighed laws protecting Indian religious freedoms and those protecting parks and birds of prey.
NEWS
December 26, 1995
FireWinfield: Winfield firefighters responded to a residential fire alarm in the 2200 block of Hopi Court at 2:40 a.m. Friday. Units returned in 26 minutes.Woodbine: Firefighters from Winfield and Lisbon in Howard County responded to a fire alarm in the 7700 block of Woodbine Road at 8:13 a.m. Friday. Units were out 17 minutes.
NEWS
By SEAN REILY and SEAN REILY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 5, 2006
HOPI RESERVATION, Ariz. -- A rifle hangs under Pauline Whitesinger's mud-packed timber ceiling. It's placed within easy reach so she can scare off the coyotes that threaten her sheep. But there have been times when she's imagined other uses. "Maybe we should have set up firearms at our doorways so we could defend our homes," she said in her native Navajo language, as translated by her nephew Danny Blackgoat. Whitesinger lives like her ancestors did, in an eight-sided, juniper hogan - without electricity or running water - in the reaches of Big Mountain, Ariz.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 1999
DENVER -- Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt favors a policy change that would allow members of the Hopi tribe to remove golden eagles from a national monument in northern Arizona, a move that critics fear could open the door to hunting in national parks.The issue at the Wupatki National Monument near Flagstaff, Ariz., has been percolating since summer, when the Hopi requested permission to take eaglets for use in a religious ceremony. Taking or hunting of animals in national parks is prohibited, but Babbitt said in an interview that he favors allowing an exception in this case.
NEWS
October 2, 1995
FireMount Airy: Mount Airy responded to a brush fire in the 100 block of N. Towne Court at 10:04 p.m. Thursday. Units were out 26 minutes.Taylorsville: Winfield engines responded to investigate a report of a fire alarm sounding in a building on Hopi Court at 10:10 a.m. Thursday. Units were out 30 minutes.Winfield: Winfield engines responded to an auto fire on West Old Liberty Road at 11:27 a.m. Thursday. Units were out 30 minutes.
FEATURES
By M. R. Montgomery and M. R. Montgomery,Boston Globe | July 14, 1994
This modest, wise, small book would perhaps escape attention were it not for the incredible boom in tourism to the remote Four Corners territory of the Southwest. So be it: If the lost time and lost land described in this autobiographical essay have been irrevocably changed by modernity and motor vehicles, tourism and telephones, Edward T. Hall's memoir of a time and space lost forever will at least be read by people who have already acquired a taste for Navajo and Hopi country.For tourists who have gotten their hands on the excellent California Automobile Association travel map of the southwest Indian country, "West of the Thirties," will provide an unusual additional guide, an authentic example of that rarest commodity -- truth about how it was. Mr. Hall, before beginning a long career in anthropology (pioneering the field of nonverbal communication)
NEWS
By Tillie Friedenberg | May 4, 1991
Trudging heat-red Hopi mesasPanting, you and I, old lover,Relishing these sandy momentsWalking bone hard plateau land.Sun's rays meet the mesa's edgesTurquoise skies surpass gem bluenessAncient shadows of Kachinascast patina'd spirit spells.Butterfly Kachina DancerShe with clay beads on her foreheadTwirls enticements to Rain SpiritBlack Bear quells all tribal frights.Souvenirs of driftwood god-dollsTrimmed with feathers, fur ruffed neck rings:Blind Eyed Traveler, strong for walkingCarries Weak Legs on his back.
NEWS
January 20, 2004
On Saturday January 17, 2004, EVA COHEN (nee Epstein); beloved wife of the late Sigmund Cohen, devoted mother of Harvey Cohen and Barry Cohen, dear mother-in-law of Annette Cohen and Charleen Cohen, devoted sister of the late Samuel Epstein, Bernice Segal, and Abe Epstein, loving grandmother of Larry and Bonnie Cohen, Barbara and the late Robert Lazzelle, loving great grandmother of Danielle and Steven Cohen, and Stacey Lazzelle. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd, at Mt. Wilson Lane on Monday January 19, 2004 at 10 AM. Interment Anshe Emunah Aitz Chaim Congregation Cememtery, Washington Blvd.
NEWS
January 27, 1993
* Elkridge:: 6300 block of Greenfield Road: A white 1988 Ford Mustang was stolen between 3 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. Saturday. The Maryland license plates are XXY-515.* Ellicott City:: 10000 block of Baltimore National Pike: Someone threw a piece of asphalt through a front window between 3 p.m Saturday and 6:05 a.m. Monday.* 9200 block of Baltimore National Pike: Someone sprayed shaving cream on a 1985 Cadillac Coupe de Ville between noon and 1:30 p.m. Friday.* 10200 block of Clubhouse Court: Someone overturned a portable basketball pole and stole a $5 net between midnight and 7:20 a.m. Saturday.
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