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NEWS
September 2, 2009
On August 27, 2009, JOSEPH F. HOPEWELL. Friends may visit the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Wednesday after 8:30 AM, where the family will receive friends on Thursday 9 AM. Funeral services to follow at 9:30 AM.
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HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Stand-up paddleboarding might have a clunky name, but the sport has a passionate following that's growing in the Baltimore area. In September, more than 100 people gathered at Gunpowder State Park's Hammerman Beach in Middle River to participate in one of the region's first stand-up paddleboard races and, in doing so, to raise money for Baltimore County's HopeWell Cancer Support, which provides nonmedical services for people with cancer and their...
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
Right there in Columbia, just below Lake Elkhorn in the Village of Owen Brown, sits an island called Hopewell. It's not surrounded by water and it doesn't have any sand worth mentioning, but it's not that kind of island, anyway. It's a residential island - bordered by commercial property and the lake - but those who live there say they feel just as abandoned as if they had been dropped in the middle of the sea. An elementary school boundary line decision made more than a quarter of a century ago is to blame, and Hopewell residents say now is the time to overturn it, while redistricting is again on the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
McCormick & Co. and The Wine Source are hosting a wine-tasting fundraiser for HopeWell Cancer Support on May 30 at the non-profit's Lutherville headquarters. Fine Wine's Fresh Frontier: The Southern Hemisphere will include wine tastings, cheese pairings, hors d'oeuvres and a silent auction. Funds raised at the event will support the HopeWell mission, which is to create a support community for people coping with cancer. The wine tasting is 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. May 30 at HopeWell Cancer Support, 10628 Falls Road, Lutherville.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,sun reporter | September 15, 2006
As Raymont Hopewell finished saying he was sorry to the families of the five people he has confessed to killing, some audible sighs filled the packed courtroom yesterday. Some people fidgeted in their seats, while others murmured displeasure at what they felt was an insincere apology. Hopewell's statement, in its entirety: "I just wanted to tell everybody that I'm sorry for their losses." The killer stared straight ahead as he uttered the words, his face expressionless. For the still-grieving families who sat just feet away, the words were not enough to ease their pain or explain the brutal murders of four women and a man, all age 60 or older.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
Right there in Columbia, just below Lake Elkhorn in the Village of Owen Brown, sits an island called Hopewell. It isn't surrounded by water and it doesn't have any sand worth mentioning, but it's not that kind of island. It's a residential island - bordered by commercial property and the lake - but those who live there say they feel just as abandoned as if they had been dropped in the middle of the sea. An elementary school boundary line decision made more than a quarter of a century ago is to blame, and Hopewell residents say now is the time to overturn it, while redistricting is again on the table.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
Right there in Columbia, just below Lake Elkhorn in the Village of Owen Brown, sits an island called Hopewell. It's not surrounded by water and it doesn't have any sand worth mentioning, but it's not that kind of island, anyway. It's a residential island - bordered by commercial property and the lake - but those who live there say they feel just as abandoned as if they had been dropped in the middle of the sea. An elementary school boundary line decision made more than a quarter of a century ago is to blame, and Hopewell residents say now is the time to overturn it, while redistricting is again on the table.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
Sons and daughters, grandchildren and nieces, they filled the courtroom benches yesterday, steeling themselves to hear about the anguished last moments in the lives of the aged relatives whom they loved. "Remember us," one lady hissed as Raymont Hopewell entered the courtroom in shackles and chains. Her family shushed her. Hopewell had come to this Baltimore Circuit Court hearing to admit his guilt in a series of crimes that spanned from 1999 to last September. It took three prosecutors and 45 minutes to describe the rapes, murders, robberies and assaults.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
The afternoon heat shimmers along Hopewell Avenue, but that doesn't stop George Green, 75, from leaning against his green pickup truck and waxing histrionic about being present during the attack on Pearl Harbor or enjoying his reputation as an ace crane operator. Certainly, there are concessions granted to one of the senior squires of Hopewell, a two-block enclave of middle-class blacks in Essex that traces its history back more than a century. Eventually, though, like everybody else along Hopewell, Green's conversation turns to the theft of Hopewell's rich past.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 10, 1994
HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, Pa. -- A high school student named Chris Ciccone saw a lone Reebok sneaker and the charred body of a child.Episcopal Bishop Alden Hathaway discovered a perfectly manicured fingernail lying in the mud.But for Beaver County Sheriff Frank Policaro, the most haunting image was this:There was hardly anything left of the fuselage of USAir Flight 427."You go up there and look for an airplane, and you won't find one," he said. "This is my first airplane crash. I hate to tell you, but they're different from auto crashes, suicides, train wrecks and tornadoes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Hopewell H. "Hope" Barroll III, a retired WFBR-AM executive who enjoyed creating gardens with his wife and was also a noted outdoorsman and eminent practical joker, died July 1 of cancer at his Ruxton home. He was 78. Mr. Barroll, the son of Hopewell H. Barroll Jr. and Mary Louise Maslin, was born in Baltimore and raised on Overhill Road in Roland Park. His father, who had been executive vice president and general manager of WFBR, died in 1948. Mr. Barroll had attended St. Paul's School and graduated in 1950 from the Solbury School in New Hope, Pa. He attended the University of Virginia and later served in the Navy for two years aboard the battleship USS Mississippi.
NEWS
September 2, 2009
On August 27, 2009, JOSEPH F. HOPEWELL. Friends may visit the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Wednesday after 8:30 AM, where the family will receive friends on Thursday 9 AM. Funeral services to follow at 9:30 AM.
NEWS
January 18, 2007
On January 15, 2007, JEROME P. HILL. Survived by his wife Rachel R. Hill, two daughters, eight grandchildren, three brothers and two sisters and a host other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the William C. Brown Community Funeral Home, P.A., 1206 W. North Avenue, Friday 3 to 7 P.M. Family will receive friends Saturday 10 A.M., at the First Baptist Church-Essex, 1616A Hopewell Avenue. Funeral services 10:30 A.M.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,sun reporter | September 15, 2006
As Raymont Hopewell finished saying he was sorry to the families of the five people he has confessed to killing, some audible sighs filled the packed courtroom yesterday. Some people fidgeted in their seats, while others murmured displeasure at what they felt was an insincere apology. Hopewell's statement, in its entirety: "I just wanted to tell everybody that I'm sorry for their losses." The killer stared straight ahead as he uttered the words, his face expressionless. For the still-grieving families who sat just feet away, the words were not enough to ease their pain or explain the brutal murders of four women and a man, all age 60 or older.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
Sons and daughters, grandchildren and nieces, they filled the courtroom benches yesterday, steeling themselves to hear about the anguished last moments in the lives of the aged relatives whom they loved. "Remember us," one lady hissed as Raymont Hopewell entered the courtroom in shackles and chains. Her family shushed her. Hopewell had come to this Baltimore Circuit Court hearing to admit his guilt in a series of crimes that spanned from 1999 to last September. It took three prosecutors and 45 minutes to describe the rapes, murders, robberies and assaults.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
Raymont Hopewell, accused of being a serial killer who preyed mostly on the elderly, appears ready to plead guilty today in Baltimore Circuit Court to five murders, four rapes and other crimes, defense and prosecution sources confirmed last night. The plea deal would allow Hopewell, 35, to avoid the death penalty. But it would aim to ensure he is never released from prison by convicting him of at least one count in every crime with which he is charged and sentencing him to one of the longest prison terms any city prosecutor can remember.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
On December 26, 2004, CARLITA A. (nee Hopewell); beloved wife of Bruce R. Bayton; loving mother of Raymont Hopewell, Tiffany, Brandy and Thomas Bayton; loving daughter of Shirley Hopewell and the late Paul Thomas Hopewell; dear sister of Karen Crafton, Cynthia Hall, Pauline, Denise, Deborah, James, George and Ricky Hopewell and the late Paul and Michael Hopewell. Also survived by four sister-in-laws, one brother-in-law and twenty loving grandchildren, and many nieces, nephews, and other relatives and friends who will miss her dearly.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
Raymont Hopewell, accused of being a serial killer who preyed mostly on the elderly, appears ready to plead guilty today in Baltimore Circuit Court to five murders, four rapes and other crimes, defense and prosecution sources confirmed last night. The plea deal would allow Hopewell, 35, to avoid the death penalty. But it would aim to ensure he is never released from prison by convicting him of at least one count in every crime with which he is charged and sentencing him to one of the longest prison terms any city prosecutor can remember.
NEWS
July 20, 2006
When Raymont A. Hopewell walked away from a work-release program in Baltimore in September 2004, he didn't just skip out on prison. He eluded a potentially greater threat - the surrender of his DNA. The 34-year-old was among thousands of inmates on a backlogged list to have their DNA collected as state law required. His escape ensured that he would retain that significant piece of evidence for another year. Over the next 12 months, police have since charged, the convicted drug dealer murdered three elderly people, assaulted four others and raped a woman.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Raymont Hopewell entered the state prison system on April 11, 2004, for attempting to sell $20 worth of cocaine to an undercover police officer. Under Maryland law, authorities should have taken a sample of his DNA to compare against evidence collected from unsolved crimes. Had the DNA test been done, it would have matched evidence found at the scenes of two unsolved crimes on Baltimore's west side: the 1999 rape and murder of Constance Wills, 60, and the 2002 rape and murder of Sarah Shannon, 88. But Hopewell's DNA was not taken in 2004, and the matches were not made.
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