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NEWS
March 30, 1992
Hope House, a facility for the recovering alcoholic and the chemically dependant, is expanding its efforts and needs the help of the community.* It has expanded services to offer three different levels of care through Alcohol and Drug Program Management on Riva Road in Annapolis.Intermediate residential care offers patients up to six weeks of intensive in-house education and counseling in a safe and abstinent community environment. It is a 24-bed program.The extended-care program offers up to one year of continuing treatment services and teaches the skills of independent living.
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NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 11, 2013
On a sunny afternoon last week, a family could be seen walking inside Hope House Laurel, while two groups of people of varying ages sat in chairs in the shade on the side of the building talking amicably. This private substance abuse treatment center in Laurel's downtown Historic District, formerly known as Reality Inc., was closed for nearly a year, following a drawn out and very public clash between the facility's board and many of its employees over how the center was being managed.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
As angry officials of a Crownsville drug and alcohol treatment center for poor people looked on, their once-trusted ex-bookkeeper and her husband were ordered yesterday to spend a weekend in jail and to repay the nearly $60,000 they stole. County Circuit Judge Joseph P. Manck also sentenced Sherry Ann and Charles Trabing of Arnold to six months of house arrest and five years of probation in lieu of 18 months in jail for their theft from Hope House. The couple used Hope House credit cards to make thousands of dollars in personal purchases from Home Depot, Staples and Texaco.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Medical bills and other expenses strained Race Rudd Sr.'s finances, so replacing his broken-down car was beyond his means. In an imperfect arrangement, he relied on a friend to ferry him between his home in Odenton and his job as cook at the Hope House, a substance abuse treatment facility in Crownsville. One day, he told the head of the Anne Arundel County Food & Resource Bank, a Hope House neighbor where he picked up food for the treatment center, that he sure could use wheels.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | November 24, 1991
The woman was pregnant, homeless and hooked on cocaine.When an Annapolis police officer arrested her last winter on a drug-related charge, he realized right away that she didn't belong in jail. He made a few calls and got her into private treatment until a bed was free at Hope House, the county's largest non-profit residential program.That kind of partnership, sharing the responsibility with privateproviders, is critical for the survival of non-profit treatment programs in these lean times, the head of Maryland's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration warned Wednesday.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
As angry officials of a Crownsville drug and alcohol treatment center for poor people looked on, their once trusted ex-bookkeeper and her husband were ordered yesterday to spend a weekend in jail and to repay the nearly $60,000 they stole. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Joseph P. Manck also sentenced Sherry Ann and Charles Trabing to six months of house arrest and five years of probation in lieu of another 18 months in jail for their theft from Hope House. The couple used Hope House credit cards to make thousands of dollars in personal purchases.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
At Hope House, you can't watch TV in the room you share, and nearly all of your waking hours are scheduled. You have to do chores and your own laundry. And caffeinated drinks and foods are off-limits. The list goes on - a strict regimen for a clientele typically known to ignore responsibilities and restrictions. But there's always a clamor to get into Hope House, an alcohol and drug rehabilitation center on the grounds of Crownsville Hospital Center. The nonprofit center is the only one in Anne Arundel County that provides three progressive levels of residential addiction treatment - in-patient detoxification, intermediate follow-up treatment and therapy and extended care and integration into the community.
NEWS
By Jennifer Keats and Jennifer Keats,Contributing writer | August 22, 1991
Robert Law Hartge seems surprised at the number of citations, honorsand thank-yous from friends, governors and members of Congress that have accumulated in his scrapbook.Hard-pressed to remember details, the president of the board of directors of Hope House, a non-profit residential drug and alcohol treatment center in Crownsville, barely even acknowledges the day in March 1984 when "a day of celebration in honor of Robert Law Hartge" was designated by the Christ EpiscopalChurch of West River and he was honored by more than 10 organizations.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
Baltimore's only long-term residential drug treatment program will be expanded next year as the city steps up efforts to combat a chronic cocaine and heroin problem, Mayor Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. "This is a great day for a lot of people who are learning to believe in themselves," said O'Malley, standing outside Bright Hope House Inc. in West Baltimore. "We badly need more residential treatment slots in Baltimore." The mayor announced that $1.5 million funded by the city, state and private donors would be used to expand Bright Hope House in Sandtown-Winchester from a 22-bedroom to a 32- bedroom facility.
NEWS
May 7, 1992
Hope House, the county's only non-profit intermediate treatment center for chemical dependency, needs a computer printer for its Crownsville location.Used or new printers, or donations toward a printer, are needed.Information: 923-6700.@
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | April 24, 2008
Legg Mason star money manager Bill Miller hopes his Value Trust fund has seen the worst of market volatility. In a quarterly letter to shareholders released yesterday, Miller said his fund is turning a page on its "awful" performance. The Value Trust fund lost 19.7 percent in the first quarter, the worst three-month span compared with the S&P 500 index in its 26-year history. That continued a slump that began in 2006, when Miller's record 15-year streak of beating the benchmark index was broken.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
At Hope House, you can't watch TV in the room you share, and nearly all of your waking hours are scheduled. You have to do chores and your own laundry. And caffeinated drinks and foods are off-limits. The list goes on - a strict regimen for a clientele typically known to ignore responsibilities and restrictions. But there's always a clamor to get into Hope House, an alcohol and drug rehabilitation center on the grounds of Crownsville Hospital Center. The nonprofit center is the only one in Anne Arundel County that provides three progressive levels of residential addiction treatment - in-patient detoxification, intermediate follow-up treatment and therapy and extended care and integration into the community.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
Baltimore's only long-term residential drug treatment program will be expanded next year as the city steps up efforts to combat a chronic cocaine and heroin problem, Mayor Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. "This is a great day for a lot of people who are learning to believe in themselves," said O'Malley, standing outside Bright Hope House Inc. in West Baltimore. "We badly need more residential treatment slots in Baltimore." The mayor announced that $1.5 million funded by the city, state and private donors would be used to expand Bright Hope House in Sandtown-Winchester from a 22-bedroom to a 32- bedroom facility.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
As angry officials of a Crownsville drug and alcohol treatment center for poor people looked on, their once trusted ex-bookkeeper and her husband were ordered yesterday to spend a weekend in jail and to repay the nearly $60,000 they stole. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Joseph P. Manck also sentenced Sherry Ann and Charles Trabing to six months of house arrest and five years of probation in lieu of another 18 months in jail for their theft from Hope House. The couple used Hope House credit cards to make thousands of dollars in personal purchases.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
As angry officials of a Crownsville drug and alcohol treatment center for poor people looked on, their once-trusted ex-bookkeeper and her husband were ordered yesterday to spend a weekend in jail and to repay the nearly $60,000 they stole. County Circuit Judge Joseph P. Manck also sentenced Sherry Ann and Charles Trabing of Arnold to six months of house arrest and five years of probation in lieu of 18 months in jail for their theft from Hope House. The couple used Hope House credit cards to make thousands of dollars in personal purchases from Home Depot, Staples and Texaco.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and By Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | September 23, 2001
Local real estate agents, as well as those selling new homes, were looking to this weekend to give them better insight into how the housing market is going to be affected in wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. Agents are trying to figure out if the aftershocks of the tragedy will tighten the brakes on a sector that has already shown signs of slowing or if buyers and sellers will take advantage of dropping mortgage rates and reinvigorate the market. At Ryland Homes, traffic - the number of people who visit models - dropped 20 percent the weekend after the attacks, according to Earl Robinson, director of marketing and sales for the Baltimore metropolitan area's No. 2 builder.
NEWS
November 4, 1991
The deadline for nominations to the Anne Arundel County Office of Economic Development for the 1992 Maryland Small Business Awards is tomorrow.The SBA honors outstanding small business entrepreneurs andadvocates from each state, and state winners are eligible for regional and national recognition during National Small Business Week, May 10 through 16.Information: 222-7410.HOPE HOUSE HONOREDHope House, Anne Arundel's only non-profit, private intermediate residential center for alcohol and other drug dependencies recently received the Distinguished Business Award from Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2000
Anne Arundel County will expand substance abuse treatment programs to about 400 residents who now can't afford it, local Health Department officials said yesterday in announcing a $1 million state grant. "This is a good day, it's a day for changing lives," Health Officer Frances B. Phillips said shortly after the county received the gift-wrapped check during a briefing in Crownsville. "Substance abuse touches every family in this county." About 24,000 county residents need substance abuse treatment, but one-fourth have received such services, the department estimates.
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