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NEWS
April 7, 2008
GEORGE SWITZER, 92 Smithsonian mineralogist George Switzer, the mineralogist who started the Smithsonian Institution's vast collection of gems and minerals by acquiring the legendary Hope Diamond, died of pneumonia March 23 in Solomons. Mr. Switzer, who had lived in Port Republic, also played a significant role in analyzing rocks brought back from the moon. He was chairman of the mineral sciences department at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History from 1964 to 1969 and had been associate curator of the museum's division of mineralogy from 1948 to 1964.
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NEWS
April 7, 2008
GEORGE SWITZER, 92 Smithsonian mineralogist George Switzer, the mineralogist who started the Smithsonian Institution's vast collection of gems and minerals by acquiring the legendary Hope Diamond, died of pneumonia March 23 in Solomons. Mr. Switzer, who had lived in Port Republic, also played a significant role in analyzing rocks brought back from the moon. He was chairman of the mineral sciences department at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History from 1964 to 1969 and had been associate curator of the museum's division of mineralogy from 1948 to 1964.
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NEWS
February 11, 2005
HOPE DIAMOND'S BLUE BLOOD Researchers using computer analysis have traced the origin of the famed Hope Diamond, concluding that it was cut from a larger stone that was once part of the crown jewels of France. A French connection had been suspected for the Hope, but the new study shows just how it would have fit inside the larger French Blue Diamond and how that gem was cut, Smithsonian gem curator Jeffrey Post explained. The deep blue Hope Diamond, centerpiece of the gem collection at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, is famed for its claimed history of bad luck for its owners.
NEWS
February 11, 2005
HOPE DIAMOND'S BLUE BLOOD Researchers using computer analysis have traced the origin of the famed Hope Diamond, concluding that it was cut from a larger stone that was once part of the crown jewels of France. A French connection had been suspected for the Hope, but the new study shows just how it would have fit inside the larger French Blue Diamond and how that gem was cut, Smithsonian gem curator Jeffrey Post explained. The deep blue Hope Diamond, centerpiece of the gem collection at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, is famed for its claimed history of bad luck for its owners.
FEATURES
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Turn, stop, click. The pedestal pauses in its rotation and then after seconds of darkness, the lights flick on.No, no, no. The pedestal must stop and the lights must come on simultaneously.Turn, stop, click. Shimmer, shimmer, shimmer.The big blue Hope Diamond, the most famous jewel in the world, pivots and turns in its new home while nervous technicians synchronize the slow dance designed to show off its unparalleled beauty.Outside on Constitution Avenue, Washington's morning rush-hour traffic is winding down from its jaw-clinching frenzy.
NEWS
January 21, 2003
THE HOPE DIAMOND, on display at the Smithsonian Institution, is attracting quite a crowd. Hopefully, the visitors are not so blinded by the glitter that they lose sight of the Smithsonian's broader mission of increasing and disseminating scientific knowledge. On Jan. 7, the Smithsonian Science Commission, 18 scientists appointed by the institution's Board of Regents, released a report arguing that the Smithsonian's scientific mission is faltering, in large part due to the erosion of funding for long-term research.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
WASHINGTON - The Smithsonian Institution has opened its new exhibition hall - a super-secured repository where geology dazzles even the most jaded of visitors - with a gem of a show."
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- To spiders, scorpions, termites and othe creepy crawlies, Orkin Pest Control is the enemy. But to hundreds of insects at the Smithsonian Institution's insect zoo, the Orkin Man is a friend.The Atlanta-based company contributed $500,000 for renovation of the popular exhibit at the Museum of Natural History, which will reopen in September as the "O. Orkin Insect Zoo" -- after Otto Orkin, the company's founder.The gift highlights the Smithsonian's funding dilemma. The sprawling complex's needs are outstripping its public funding, but the search for alternative resources is raising accusations of a sellout.
NEWS
August 11, 1994
Our neighbors to the east, in the Blue Hen state of Delaware, have a decidedly pro-business reputation. These folks believe in the unshackled, free-enterprise way of life. And to prove it, Delawareans retain their novel system for assigning automobile license tags. Once you get a number, it's yours forever. You can even pass it along to another family member in your will.Over the years, owning the low numbers (No. 4 is the lowest available after the assignments of No. 1 to the governor's car, No. 2 to the lieutenant governor's vehicle and No. 3 to the secretary of state)
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | November 11, 1999
Weightlifting is traditionally an adult sport: Athletes can train into their mid-30s before becoming world class! But at 16, Cheryl Haworth is rewriting the rules -- and the record books.Three years into her career, Haworth already owns every U.S. women's weightlifting record. She's preparing for her first world championship next month in Athens, Greece.The Savannah, Ga., native has the weightiest of goals: "I won't stop lifting until I know I can get close to, or become, the best in the world," she said.
NEWS
January 21, 2003
THE HOPE DIAMOND, on display at the Smithsonian Institution, is attracting quite a crowd. Hopefully, the visitors are not so blinded by the glitter that they lose sight of the Smithsonian's broader mission of increasing and disseminating scientific knowledge. On Jan. 7, the Smithsonian Science Commission, 18 scientists appointed by the institution's Board of Regents, released a report arguing that the Smithsonian's scientific mission is faltering, in large part due to the erosion of funding for long-term research.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
WASHINGTON - The Smithsonian Institution has opened its new exhibition hall - a super-secured repository where geology dazzles even the most jaded of visitors - with a gem of a show."
FEATURES
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Turn, stop, click. The pedestal pauses in its rotation and then after seconds of darkness, the lights flick on.No, no, no. The pedestal must stop and the lights must come on simultaneously.Turn, stop, click. Shimmer, shimmer, shimmer.The big blue Hope Diamond, the most famous jewel in the world, pivots and turns in its new home while nervous technicians synchronize the slow dance designed to show off its unparalleled beauty.Outside on Constitution Avenue, Washington's morning rush-hour traffic is winding down from its jaw-clinching frenzy.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Police cited the owners of 10 strip clubs on Baltimore's Block last night and plan to file criminal charges against two of them after a 17-year-old female accused the bars of hiring underage dancers.Police said they will file violation notices with the city liquor board against eight bars and issue criminal summonses ordering the owners of the Stage Door and Club Pussycat to appear in court on charges of contributing to the delinquency of a minor.Sgt. Craig Gentile, who heads the Central District vice unit, said he has been investigating allegations of minors dancing at the clubs for months but now has a witness willing to testify.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | February 11, 1994
Irene E. Dodson, a receptionist for the Four East Madison Orthopedic Association for nearly 78 years, died Feb. 3 at Union Memorial Hospital after a heart attack. The Baltimore resident was 95.In the summer of 1914, the orthopedic association, one of the country's oldest physicians' groups, hired her for what was to be a two-week stint.She stayed for more than three-quarters of a century.Her sister, Pearl Johnson, now 98, worked as a physician's assistant for the orthopedic association until 1992, when both sisters retired.
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