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NEWS
August 14, 2013
As summer in Maryland begins to fade, I can't help but think about the millions of children and young adults returning to school. I know how fortunate we are to live in a land of relative peace and opportunity, especially for our children's sake. In stark contrast is Syria, a nation beset by a violent conflict that has left millions of Syrian children displaced, homeless, or worse, unable to attain anything close to opportunity. The war in Syria is nearing its three-year mark, having claimed 100,000 lives and forced millions from their homes.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The panels on the stand-up display feature the words of a dozen women who survived domestic violence, telling why they stayed and how they left. Growing out of a larger effort to tackle domestic abuse - or intimate partner violence - as an issue affecting health and safety in the workplace, Kaiser Permanente sends the display, featuring the stories of its employees, around to its medical centers. The project aims to "to open up a conversation, to let employees and members know they're not the only one who may be experiencing domestic violence," said Ann Jordan, program manager for women's health at Kaiser, which offers domestic violence prevention programs to employees, including on-site services, referrals to community services such as shelters and training to recognize signs of abuse.
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NEWS
April 19, 2011
The greatest legacy of William Donald Schaefer is that he prevented Baltimore from becoming another Detroit or Newark or Camden. Because of his visionary policies, Baltimore was transformed from a dying, industrial-based city to one driven by tourism, health and IT. He restored hope to a city devastated by the riots in 1968 and by sheer force of will created the conditions that have led to the revitalization of neighborhoods like Federal Hill, Canton...
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Dawn Root's life took a serendipitous turn two years ago, one that eventually brought her to talk about her mother's death as a way to fight domestic violence. The Glen Burnie resident spoke as an advocate and survivor Tuesday at the fifth annual candlelight vigil held by HopeWorks, a Howard County agency that serves victims of sexual, dating and domestic violence. The event, held in Columbia, marked October's designation as Domestic Violence Awareness Month across the country. Root told the gathering of 40 people wearing purple ribbons that she is on a mission to speak to audiences across the Baltimore area "since living in the darkness wasn't serving me, and I realized it was time to leave negativity behind.
NEWS
September 15, 2011
The low turnout in Baltimore's primary election Tuesday is the signal that the citizens of Baltimore have no hope for anything in Baltimore to improve ("Election draws lowest turnout in history," Sept. 14). Let me be clear, the citizens of Baltimore haven't lost hope, they have abandoned hope. They believe nothing can change, and they have resigned themselves to another four years of spiraling misery. The reason is clear - 45-plus years of uninterrupted Democratic mayors and administrations have brought Baltimore to it's knees.
NEWS
November 20, 2011
Never have I read a more poignant and thought provoking opinion piece than Ron Smith's last column for The Sun ("My work here is done," Nov. 18). It seems cut and dried that realism is the proper philosophy when someone elects not to continue cancer treatment. But what about this idea called hope, the desire accompanied by expectation? Some oncologist or someone else might eventually come to say: "Hey, your tests have shown you are getting better. We've got a new promising drug that works wonders.
EXPLORE
September 19, 2012
The United Methodist Women of Grace UM Church in Aberdeen recently enjoyed a program given about "Threads of Hope. " This is ministry sponsored by Hopewell UM Church in Havre de Grace, which also includes members of Wesleyan Chapel UMC in Aberdeen. Prayer shawls, lap robes, quilts and blankets are made by members of the group, who then pray over them before taking them to those who are ill, bereaved or in need of comfort. The program was sponsored by the Priscilla Circle and arranged by member Virginia Phillips.
HEALTH
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
Douglas Bayne joined the Merritt Athletic Club in downtown Baltimore about five years ago, but he hasn't exactly been a gym rat. "I work out for two weeks and I'll take off for eight months," the 38-year-old social worker said. So like many other Americans, Bayne resolved to get healthy in 2012. He spent New Year's Day at the gym, hopping onto the treadmill for a 60-minute walk. He hopes to gain energy and improve his health as approaches "the big 4-0," he said. "I don't feel as healthy as I used to feel," Bayne said.
NEWS
July 28, 2010
The story of Stephen Pitcairn's murder ("A promising life is cut short," July 27) elicits feelings of outrage and profound sadness, but much worse still, it elicits despair. As I consider the contrast between the many accomplishments in his young life and the details of his death, hope sinks like a stone. Where is the hope for Baltimore? What is the incentive for criminals not to commit crimes? Can we hope that prison will lead to a reformed life? Surely not, for prison is little more than a safer environment for gangs and gang mentality, for street culture, to thrive, a holding tank at best; and release from prison, statistically speaking, is merely an opportunity to commit more heinous acts leading to longer sentences.
NEWS
December 17, 2012
As a former Morgan State University faculty member for more than a decade, I often used the word hope when speaking of President David Wilson ("Morgan state University refuses to renew contract of president," Dec. 11). He brought to the university a genuine interest in the concerns of faculty, students and staff through frequent small meetings and large forums that were never intimidating. Morgan prior to Mr. Wilson had a tendency toward insular thinking and little interest in getting or using the opinions of all but a select few. Mr. Wilson attempted to change that.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
From everything I have read about Larry Hogan, he is not a politician, at least not by today's standards or those of Maryland. Anyone following him knows that he is offering sound solutions based on hard truths instead of the panaceas that voters seem to prefer. He has also appealed to black voters to look beyond race and objectively compare his platform with that of his opponent, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown ( "Hogan, Brown differ in message to black voters," Oct. 4). Another group that he needs to appeal to is non-voting conservative whites who want all or nothing.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
How much do you know about the week's new events? Or the geography of the Middle East? Or Batman movies? Coleman Anderson and his partner, Andrew Schuster, are betting a few hundred thousand of their investors' dollars that whatever you know, you'll want to test yourself, and that you're willing to spend time in the pursuit on their new website: Newsup. "The goal really is to make news a more meaningful experience for folks," especially young people, said Anderson, the chief marketing officer, who is 29. The site — http://www.newsup.me — presents news about national and world events, entertainment and sports in the form of an array of brief quizzes on a particular topic.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The Maryland Zoo opened its first new major exhibit in a decade on Saturday, pinning its hopes on the endangered African penguin to spark a renaissance for the beleaguered institution. The new, $11 million Penguin Coast is now one of the first things visitors see after taking a shuttle to the park's exhibits. A small island designed to mimic a makeshift South African fishing camp sits in the center of a ring of water, so the penguins can swim in circles past an enclosed underwater viewing area.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Campaigns on Baltimore County's east side are still in full swing, but one outcome is already certain: For the first time in nearly half a century, voters get a new state senator. Democratic Sen. Norman Stone, who took office in 1967, is retiring from the General Assembly. Fellow Democrat John Olszewski Jr., currently a state delegate; Republican Johnny Ray Salling, a steelworker; and unaffiliated candidate Scott Collier are competing to replace him. Stone, who entered the Senate the year Spiro Agnew became governor, is its longest-serving member.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Former Pro Bowl outside linebacker Elvis Dumervil is hoping to crank up the Ravens' languishing pass rush. Through three games, the Ravens have recorded just three sacks with two of them registered by Dumervil during a win over the Pittsburgh Steelers. The Ravens (2-1) are tied for 27th in the NFL in sacks. Pro Bowl outside linebacker Terrell Suggs has zero sacks this season and just one sack in his past 11 games, the last one coming last December when he tagged down New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Ravens rookie linebacker C.J. Mosley lines up on every snap beside who he calls an “old-school” linebacker, Daryl Smith. On the opposite sideline Sunday, he'll cross paths with Panthers star Luke Kuechly, the 2013 Associated Press Defensive Player of the Year and the new standard for the athletic, three-down linebacker Mosley hopes to become. “[He's] one of the guys that can move around, make plays in the coverage and move sideline to sideline,” Mosley said. “Watching him at Boston College when I was at Alabama, then after he came out … [he made]
NEWS
July 20, 2012
In his commentary, John Seager bemoans the births of so many infants ("An unhappy World Population Day," July 11). He claims we can't feed them all. In fact, incalculable quantities of food are wasted as evil men starve the children and greedy men impound great storehouses of food. Mr. Seager claims we can't supply the world with sufficient water for its children. Yet, we have vast lakes and rivers and sophisticated means for desalinization of our enormous oceans. But selfish men refuse to grant access to these supplies; they and their governments build grand monuments to themselves and let the children die in thirst.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Jon B. Singer, a successful Baltimore businessman who was active in Jewish philanthropic causes that ranged from helping those suffering from drug abuse to mentoring young men and women starting businesses, died of pancreatic cancer Aug. 31 at his Pikesville home. He was 71. "His compassion and generosity knew no bounds. Even though he ran several businesses and was a devoted family man, he always found time to help those who were in need," said Jerry Sutton, who was executive director of House of Hope, a Reisterstown Road recovery facility that Mr. Singer founded for Jewish men struggling to overcome drug addiction and substance abuse.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Ravens veteran cornerback Lardarius Webb was pulled from the game by coach John Harbaugh after playing just four snaps against the Cleveland Browns on Sunday. It marked his first game back from a lower back injury that prevented him from playing in the first two regular season games and the entire preseason. Webb finished with one tackle and had trouble staying with receivers in his season debut, but is hopeful that coach John Harbaugh will increase his playing time this week.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The flowering branches of Mulan magnolia that grace the cover of Joan Lok's new book on Chinese brush painting appear more brightly colored than in her original work, probably to catch the eye of someone browsing in a bookstore, guesses the author. The Columbia resident says she is pleased with the quality of paper used for the book and the way the reproductions of her original flower paintings neatly fit with the detailed instructions on the soft-cover book's 128 pages. And the longtime federal employee is also happy her first how-to book will be available at bookshops and at a local chain of craft stores, tapping into a marketing niche.
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