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By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
It's 9:30 a.m. on a Friday, and a short line of cars has formed in the drive-thru of Java Divas coffee shop. Inside the small gray shed, barista Lauren Lucabaugh serves a frappuccino with a smile — and little else. The brown-haired, blue-eyed Lucabaugh sports a skimpy purple and black bikini, which her customer, Justin Hartman, glances at before thanking her for the cold coffee drink and driving off. "I've never seen anything like this," said Hartman, a 23-year-old who lives in Pasadena.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 23, 2014
If you are a veteran or in the military, 10 chicken wings at Hooters are on the house on Memorial Day. This year, that goes for spouses, too. "Military spouses have to make some of the toughest sacrifices in the world, especially when their loved ones are away on active duty," said Andrew Pudduck, vice president of marketing for Hooters of America. This Monday, military personnel and spouses can choose from bone in or boneless wings with buffalo or other sauces. The deal is good with any drink purchase and ID at any of the 345 restaurants.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 23, 2014
If you are a veteran or in the military, 10 chicken wings at Hooters are on the house on Memorial Day. This year, that goes for spouses, too. "Military spouses have to make some of the toughest sacrifices in the world, especially when their loved ones are away on active duty," said Andrew Pudduck, vice president of marketing for Hooters of America. This Monday, military personnel and spouses can choose from bone in or boneless wings with buffalo or other sauces. The deal is good with any drink purchase and ID at any of the 345 restaurants.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
An African-American woman is alleging she was fired from the Baltimore Inner Harbor Hooters' restaurant for having an "unnatural" hair color, according to a complaint filed with Maryland Commission on Civil Rights. Farryn Johnson, 25, claims her supervisors said her blond highlights violated the appearance policy for "Hooters Girls," according to her attorney, Jessica P. Weber of Brown, Goldstein & Levy LLP. When Johnson pointed out that other waitresses had obviously dyed hair -- an Asian-American woman had bright red hair and a white woman had black hair with platinum highlights -- her supervisors said her hair was "not natural" because she was African-American, according to the complaint.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 27, 1993
Hooters is a restaurant-bar for the age: the age of arrested adolescence. The skimpy waitress outfits tell us to step right up, but the modern sensibilities warn, keep your distance. Didn't we work our way through all this sexual exploitation business about a generation ago?Apparently, in case you hadn't noticed, we did not.Lawsuits and protests were floating around the country last week, all relating to sexual harassment; charges against the nationwide chain and all making us wonder: Just who needs to grow up around here?
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUSINESS EDITOR | November 7, 1990
Why Lawyers Were InventedYou are a shareholder in Baltimore Bancorp. You watched with interest last April as First Maryland Bancorp offered to buy your shares for $17 in cash -- nearly $7 above its market price at the time. The offer was spurned.During the summer and fall, Baltimore Bancorp continued to resist First Maryland's offer, with Chairman Harry Robinson leading the way in expressing the bank's interest in remaining independent and in suggesting that the $17 price was inadequate. You also watched as the stock market, and particularly banking stocks, went into the tank.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | November 16, 1990
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- At Hooters, the chicken wings come mild, medium, hot or Three Mile Island. But these days it's the breasts that are causing all the heat.A sex discrimination complaint against the popular restaurant chain could leave judges and lawyers debating one deceptively simple question -- just what does Hooters really sell? Chicken wings or cheesecake?Two weeks ago, a district director of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Pasco County near Tampa found that Hooters discriminates against men by hiring only women as bartenders and waitresses.
FEATURES
July 18, 2006
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C -- Robert Brooks had a simple explanation for the success of his Hooters chain, known as much for its waitresses' tight T-shirts as for its chicken wings. "Good food, cold beer and pretty girls never go out of style," he told Fortune magazine in 2003. Mr. Brooks, chairman of the restaurant chain, was found dead at his home Sunday at 69. Coroner Robert Edge said an autopsy found Mr. Brooks died of natural causes, but he would not be more specific. Since opening its first restaurant in Clearwater, Fla., in 1983, Hooters of America Inc. has expanded into 46 states and 19 countries.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 15, 1995
I called the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission yesterday but, of course, there was no one there. So we'll have to wait until all nonessential personnel return to work to find out whether the EEOC thinks Hooters should be renamed, "Guys In Orange Shorts."Extreme? I dunno. Not when you consider how the EEOC wants Hooters to settle a discrimination-in-hiring complaint. (About $22 million in settlement, if need be.)Against whom does the Atlanta-based restaurant chain allegedly discriminate?
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON CO ROGER SIMON | December 21, 1990
Good Roger and Bad Roger were deciding where to go for lunch."Let's go to a soup kitchen, serve lunch to the unfortunates and then get some table scraps for ourselves," Good Roger said.Bad Roger rolled his eyes. "Why do you always get to pick the place?" he asked. "How come I can't pick? How come I can't select some decent, normal place in which to eat?""OK, OK," Good Roger said. "You pick."So they went to Hooters.Hooters of Harborplace hasn't been there very long, but it already is very controversial.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Despite tightening school budgets and a perpetual rallying cry for more funding, Baltimore school administrators spent roughly $500,000 during the past year and a half on expenses such as a $7,300 office retreat at a downtown hotel, $300-per-night stays at hotels, and a $1,000 dinner at an exclusive members-only club, credit card statements show. City school officials defend the majority of the credit card expenditures - outlined in statements and receipts obtained by The Baltimore Sun through a Maryland Public Information Act request - as "the cost of doing business," saying only a handful of "outliers" show questionable judgment or disregard for taxpayer money.
NEWS
June 26, 2012
My husband and I live in York County, Pa., and recently we decided to visit the Inner Harbor, which we hadn't been to in some time. We arrived around noon and walked through the first building, where we found some changes but nothing drastic. Sadly, that was not our finding on entering the second building. We used to enjoy the many vendor booths and food stands there, but this time there was very little to see. A clothing store and Bubba Gump had replaced Phillips restaurant, and on the second level all we found was a Hooters and Ripley's Believe It or Not. We were very disappointed and were on our way back on I-83 just two-and-a-half hours later, after paying $19 in parking fees.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Over the past seven months, Jheri Stratton has been quarantined in her house for a while, ordered to wear a mask to walk her dog, and monitored twice a week by a city Health Department official who watches to ensure that she swallows a handful of pills. She has had to cancel vacations and explain to friends why she can't go out. Since the former waitress at Hooters in downtown Baltimore was diagnosed with active tuberculosis in November, allegedly after she and others contracted the disease from a manager at the Harborplace restaurant, her life has been miserable, Stratton said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
It's 9:30 a.m. on a Friday, and a short line of cars has formed in the drive-thru of Java Divas coffee shop. Inside the small gray shed, barista Lauren Lucabaugh serves a frappuccino with a smile — and little else. The brown-haired, blue-eyed Lucabaugh sports a skimpy purple and black bikini, which her customer, Justin Hartman, glances at before thanking her for the cold coffee drink and driving off. "I've never seen anything like this," said Hartman, a 23-year-old who lives in Pasadena.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | July 17, 2008
Next to this is a column about mixed martial arts light-heavyweight Forrest Griffin, who won an Ultimate Fighting Championship title July 5. The day after the upset win over Quinton "Rampage" Jackson, Griffin had a seat in the World Series of Poker main event. The seat cost $10,000, but an online poker site paid the fee, and Griffin reflected on that and other perks that could come with being a champion MMA fighter. "The thing with anything - remember why you're there," Griffin said. "People pay me to come here and play poker.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 20, 2008
Every time I come to South Florida, I'm amazed at the variety of interesting and enriching activities available to tourists and locals, and it's not all just sun, sand and giant amphibious reptiles. If you want to a little culture, the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale is 15 minutes from the Orioles' training facility. The Art and Cultural Center of Hollywood and the Coral Springs Museum of Art also are a short drive away. OK, who am I kidding? The closest thing to fine art that I'm going to experience during my month here is the new Hooters calendar, but that's just me.
NEWS
By Holly Selby | November 3, 1990
Going to Hooters of Harborplace for the chicken wings is like subscribing to Playboy magazine for the articles.Both the wings and the articles are meaty -- and both are enticingly packaged.Hooters -- part of an Atlanta-based restaurant chain that features beer, chicken wings and scantily clad waitresses -- opened in Baltimore two weeks ago and has drawn crowds and controversy ever since.The Baltimore chapter of the National Organization for Women has charged that Hooters is unsuitable for its harbor location and practices sexual discrimination by hiring only women as food servers.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | October 26, 1990
HOOTING MAY not be the right word to describe the reaction of most visitors to Hooters, Harborplace's new restaurant. Giggles and sheepish grins were more common among the curious clientele -- mostly men -- who came to lunch this week at the restaurant that opened Tuesday in the Light Street pavilion.A predominantly Southern restaurant chain, and reportedly one of the fastest growing in the country, Hooters' claim to fame is its chicken wings and scantily clad waitresses. It was clear that the crowds during its first days of business hadn't come for the wings alone.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | March 15, 2007
You say you don't understand what all the fuss is about. In your office, knots of people gather like something out of an M. Night Shyamalan movie to scream at the TV. Generally, the only time people scream at the TV is when the president is on, talking about the war in Iraq. But now people are screaming things like: "How can they call that a foul?!" and "God, why is he taking that shot?!" And the people who aren't screaming at the TV are sitting at their desks studying sheets of paper with brackets the way you'd study for the law boards.
FEATURES
July 18, 2006
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C -- Robert Brooks had a simple explanation for the success of his Hooters chain, known as much for its waitresses' tight T-shirts as for its chicken wings. "Good food, cold beer and pretty girls never go out of style," he told Fortune magazine in 2003. Mr. Brooks, chairman of the restaurant chain, was found dead at his home Sunday at 69. Coroner Robert Edge said an autopsy found Mr. Brooks died of natural causes, but he would not be more specific. Since opening its first restaurant in Clearwater, Fla., in 1983, Hooters of America Inc. has expanded into 46 states and 19 countries.
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