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Honor System

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NEWS
May 30, 2013
In his recent commentary ("Punishing honesty at the Naval Academy," May 28), Professor Randall Leonard has missed the point of the honor system but has, perhaps inadvertently, raised a different but valid point. Midshipmen are, or should be, taught to tell the truth at all times. The honor system applies to all midshipmen, regardless of their class standings. Only a pathological liar speaks untruthfully when he or she has nothing at stake. The U.S. Naval Academy honor system requires honesty in spite of personal cost.
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NEWS
May 30, 2013
In his recent commentary ("Punishing honesty at the Naval Academy," May 28), Professor Randall Leonard has missed the point of the honor system but has, perhaps inadvertently, raised a different but valid point. Midshipmen are, or should be, taught to tell the truth at all times. The honor system applies to all midshipmen, regardless of their class standings. Only a pathological liar speaks untruthfully when he or she has nothing at stake. The U.S. Naval Academy honor system requires honesty in spite of personal cost.
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
At least two members of the District 32 General Assembly delegation would like to explore during the legislative session that starts next month doing away with the honor system for riding Light Rail."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Students at Howard High School emerge from cafeteria lines with plates as green as well-manicured lawns. They reach for steamed broccoli and fresh lettuce as quickly as they do macaroni and cheese and popcorn chicken. And they say they their healthful eating habits extend beyond school hours. "Away from school, I'm a big burger guy," Howard High senior Joshua Steward said. "And a burger, you know what color it is. So I try to make it greener, stacking on lettuce, tomatoes, everything to make it healthier, and it always turns out great.
NEWS
June 6, 1996
SOMETHING IS AWRY with the U.S. Naval Academy's system of discipline. The academy has a strict honor code that prohibits lying, cheating or stealing. But it appears that the sanction against lying is being misapplied to punish a female midshipman who lodged a sexual assault complaint against a student leader.Naomi Jackson faces expulsion from the academy. She was convicted four days before graduation last month, and was denied the right to graduate with her class. She now faces the loss of her degree and a commission as an officer in the Navy.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 27, 1994
Republicans ought to make up their minds whether to oppose any health plan or offer a better one.Somebody better tell the admirals that an honor system doesn't work when people who tell the truth are penalized and liars are rewarded.Michael Jackson and his accuser have settled. Settled what, we don't know.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2002
The stand appears at the edge of a driveway along Pleasantville Road. It is a small, round patio table laden with fat tomatoes, green peppers, eggplant, beets and summer squash that Michael Donhauser has spent the past few months nurturing from seed to harvest. Donhauser, a retired grocery store manager, spends hours each day puttering in the two garden plots he cultivates behind his tidy Fallston home and his son's house across the two-lane road. He weeds and waters, plants and picks, tills and toils.
NEWS
June 23, 1994
Light Rail honor system breeds crimeRegarding light rail crime and specifically in reference to the calls for elimination of the "honor" system from residents and businesses adversely affected by crime, Diana Rosborough, a Mass Transit Administration spokeswoman, says that:"We believe the honor system works. It is the only system that is used on the light rails in the country."Let me ask Ms. Rosborough, if the honor system works, why doesn't the MTA use it on the subway or the bus system, neither of which have proven to create the increased crime created by light rail?
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - There was a time, say University of Virginia alumni, when the school's renowned honor system was a tradition that they carried in their hearts. But today, those same old-timers say, the system needs a jump-start from their wallets. In an unprecedented effort, the University of Virginia Alumni Association is soliciting donations for a $2 million "Honor Endowment" that will likely pay for ethics seminars and promotional videos, among other things, to bolster an honor system that has shown signs of weakening.
NEWS
August 5, 1993
The U.S. Naval Academy has launched a review of its honor code, prompted by charges that the system failed during a recent cheating scandal. But that misses the point. The code did not fail; the failure lies with the midshipmen who chose to clam up or lie when they appeared before the honor board.The honor code is simple: A midshipman does not lie, cheat or steal. And if a midshipman knows or suspects someone has lied, cheated or stolen, he or she has a moral obligation to report it and tell the truth about what is known before a student honor board.
NEWS
October 21, 2004
ALLOWING ACCUSED criminals to enroll in a private home-monitoring program on their own is no way to ensure the public's safety. That was made shockingly clear recently when Baltimore police tried to track down two suspects in a murder and found -- surprise, surprise -- that neither had reported for home monitoring as ordered by a judge. The fact that two suspects failed to enroll pointed up a glaring deficiency: The state criminal justice system can't say for sure who has or hasn't registered with private home-monitoring companies.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
The honor system is out and inspectors are on the job on the Baltimore area's light rail system. The first 10 fare inspectors began work yesterday as part of an effort by the Maryland Transit Administration to crack down on free riders, a problem since the line opened in 1992. Richard Scher, an MTA spokesman, said the agency expects to put 25 more inspectors on the rails by year's end. The 35 unarmed inspectors will ask passengers for proof that they have paid the fare of $1.60 one way or $3.20 round trip.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2002
The stand appears at the edge of a driveway along Pleasantville Road. It is a small, round patio table laden with fat tomatoes, green peppers, eggplant, beets and summer squash that Michael Donhauser has spent the past few months nurturing from seed to harvest. Donhauser, a retired grocery store manager, spends hours each day puttering in the two garden plots he cultivates behind his tidy Fallston home and his son's house across the two-lane road. He weeds and waters, plants and picks, tills and toils.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - There was a time, say University of Virginia alumni, when the school's renowned honor system was a tradition that they carried in their hearts. But today, those same old-timers say, the system needs a jump-start from their wallets. In an unprecedented effort, the University of Virginia Alumni Association is soliciting donations for a $2 million "Honor Endowment" that will likely pay for ethics seminars and promotional videos, among other things, to bolster an honor system that has shown signs of weakening.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2001
Are volunteers hurt or killed in medical experiments more often than scientists acknowledge? The question has been percolating in laboratories across the United States since investigations into a healthy woman's death in a Johns Hopkins asthma experiment turned up suggestions that two previous illnesses involving the same chemical might have been improperly concealed. Scholars and federal officials say it's inherently difficult to measure how often problems are not reported. But many say there's enough anecdotal evidence from lawsuits and complaints to suggest that the nation's system for monitoring "adverse events" during experiments should be improved.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | July 15, 2001
The joys of the Web are its offbeat "content" sites. You've almost certainly fallen in love with some of them - the edgy political commentary, film reviews, gossip, recipes, math problems, animations and jokes. But love is one thing and money quite another. So far, readers have declined to pay for the sites they like. They treat the Web as a public service whose talented thinkers, artists and writers should care only about keeping them entertained. Where's the payback for maintaining an interesting site?
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | June 3, 1993
Faculty members at the U.S. Naval Academy sent a clear message yesterday that their morale is continuing to sink in the wake of the school's recent cheating scandal.In an unprecedented meeting with the academy's Board of Visitors, some 150 civilian and military professors complained that they feel disenfranchised and called for an overhaul of the honor system, according to those who attended."They want to be involved. They want to be listened to, and they feel they have not been sufficiently," said James M. Cannon, chairman of the advisory board, made up of six presidential appointees and nine members of Congress.
NEWS
February 20, 1991
Rail fare honor systemFares on the new Hunt Valley to Glen Burnie light-rail line will be collected on an honor system, with only about one in three riders actually asked to produce their tickets, the House Judiciary Committee was told yesterday.Those caught without their tickets, however, could face a fine of up to $500.Ronald J. Hartman, general manager of the state's Mass Transit Administration, said the "barrier-free collection system" is less expensive and requires less equipment than other types of fare systems and will make it easier for passengers to board the trains.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | February 12, 2001
If you've ever bought a book or CD from Amazon.com, try this little experiment: point your Web browser to www.seti.org. You say you've never heard of this outfit? Well, it appears they've heard of you. In fact, when you arrive at the SETI Web page, you'll probably see a little box that welcomes you by name and asks for a donation. Now try browsing around couple of other sites you've probably never heard of, such as satire wire.com, or chank.com, or indigenousrocks.com. They all seem to know who you are. Big Brother at work?
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
About a dozen members of the secret team that designed the first secure telephone system during World War II staged a reunion at the National Security Agency yesterday to celebrate the unveiling of a new exhibit at the agency's museum honoring their work. The team, the Army's 805th Signal Service Company, included several dozen of the country's top engineers and mathematicians. They created a system that converted voices into digital signals, the first system of its kind, which paved the way for computers, faxes and CDs. The system of encryption was so advanced, agency officials said yesterday, that it is still largely unbreakable.
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