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Honor Code

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NEWS
May 5, 1993
Some midshipmen do lie, cheat or steal. Some get caught. Some confess. Some get away with it.Although the U.S. Naval Academy claims a higher moral ground, its honor system is no more perfect than those at other colleges and universities.Did the honor code bring to justice every midshipman who saw a copy of a stolen electrical engineering test before it was given this past Dec. 14? Probably not.This was the biggest cheating scandal at the academy in 20 years, with 28 juniors accused and others suspected of knowing about the stolen test.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 30, 2011
For years my contention has been that employees who are not supervised are more likely to "cheat" the system than not. To speak of the "honor code" among American workers is to speak in the past tense. Without immediate supervision, given the opportunity to pull up their shirt sleeves or opt for the sofa, most Americans would opt for the sofa. So I was not surprised in the least to hear of the arrests of 13 city employees found goofing off on the job ("13 workers caught gambling," March 27)
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NEWS
August 5, 1993
The U.S. Naval Academy has launched a review of its honor code, prompted by charges that the system failed during a recent cheating scandal. But that misses the point. The code did not fail; the failure lies with the midshipmen who chose to clam up or lie when they appeared before the honor board.The honor code is simple: A midshipman does not lie, cheat or steal. And if a midshipman knows or suspects someone has lied, cheated or stolen, he or she has a moral obligation to report it and tell the truth about what is known before a student honor board.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
The Naval Academy superintendent, recently under fire over an off-the-books "slush fund," will be forced out of his position a month earlier than expected, officials said Tuesday, as the military also overturned his recommendations that two students be expelled. Vice Adm. Jeffrey L. Fowler had planned to retire in September after three years at the academy's helm, but the chief of naval operations, Adm. Gary Roughead, directed an exit by the first week in August, saying it would "better position the Naval Academy for success in the upcoming year," according to a Navy spokesman.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | December 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A Naval Academy advisory committee has recommended sweeping changes in the midshipmen's 42-year-old honor code, which has been sharply criticized following the largest cheating scandal in academy history.The Board of Visitors, made up of presidential and congressional appointees, recommended dozens of changes, including one that would make it harder to expel a midshipman because it would allow honor boards to recommend punishments other than dismissal.The changes generally call for more rigorous training in the honor code and a strict legal review of alleged honor offenses.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | December 7, 1993
The U.S. Naval Academy's strict honor code, tarnished by last year's widespread cheating scandal, may be revamped to include a larger role for lawyers, officers and faculty in the education and enforcement process.Currently, midshipmen are largely responsible for investigating and ruling on honor violations as well as educating the brigade on the code.An academy committee, which has spent two months studying the honor system, will this week draft its report, which is expected to recommend that the burden for upholding the 42-year-old code be shared with military and academy officials, academy and committee sources said.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | December 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A U.S. Naval Academy advisory committee recommended sweeping changes yesterday in the midshipmen's 42-year-old honor code, which has been sharply criticized following the largest cheating scandal in academy history.The Board of Visitors, made up of presidential and congressional appointees, recommended dozens of changes, including one that would make it harder to expel a midshipman because it would allow honor boards to recommend punishments other than dismissal.The changes generally call for more rigorous training in the honor code and a strict legal review of alleged honor offenses.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and Holly Selby and JoAnna Daemmrich and Holly Selby,Staff Writers | February 14, 1993
From the day they arrive at the Naval Academy, midshipmen are taught to polish brass, to follow orders, to put the group before the individual. Above all, they are taught that personal honor is absolute.Last week's announcement that at least 28 midshipmen were involved in passing around copies of a stolen final exam for one of the school's toughest courses strikes at the very heart of that philosophy."We're talking from Day One, from the very first day we get here we know that honor is the most important thing," said Reuben Brigety, a 19-year-old sophomore from Jacksonville, Fla. "If the men we lead and our supervisors can't trust us, then the system doesn't work."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and JoAnna Daemmrich and Tom Bowman and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writers | August 18, 1993
The Naval Academy's strict honor code, sharply criticized after a major cheating scandal, should be reviewed with an eye toward refinement, an academy panel says.The eight-member group composed of students, officers and faculty members told Capt. John B. Padgett III, commandant of midshipmen, earlier this month that midshipmen and professors do not have a "grasp" of the concept or how it should be administered.The academy's superintendent, Rear Adm. Thomas C. Lynch, established the committee last month and told the Board of Visitors, which oversees the academy, that he expected a report by the time the brigade returned in late August.
NEWS
July 4, 1996
NAVAL ACADEMY Superintendent Adm. Charles R. Larson's decision to discipline, rather than expel, a female midshipman for lying about missing a dinner should bolster the institution's strict honor concept. Lying is a serious honor offense at the academy, and the handling of this case doesn't undercut that basic precept.Admiral Larson's decision was not easy. Four days before graduating, Naomi Jackson was accused of lying to her roommate about missing her company's final dinner. A midshipmen-run honor board found her guilty and recommended that she be expelled.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
Boys' Latin senior lacrosse standout R.G. Keenan, who led the No. 2 Lakers to Saturday's Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference title game, was suspended from the school after officials learned on Monday that he had been charged with a number of vehicle violations, including DUI charges, on April 25. According to Baltimore County public records, Keenan, 18, was issued five citations — two DUI citations, driving while impaired,...
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | September 2, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland backup quarterback Josh Portis has been ruled ineligible for the season because he violated the university's academic honor code, he said yesterday. Portis, the fastest and perhaps most hyped of Maryland's top three quarterbacks, told The Sun yesterday that his grade point average was at least 2.0 and that he did not plagiarize but would not say exactly what the violation was. "I'm just extremely disappointed I made a mistake in violating the academic honor code," said Portis, who didn't attend the Terps' 31-14 win over Villanova yesterday.
SPORTS
By MIKE KLINGAMAN and MIKE KLINGAMAN,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
They'll be playing men's lacrosse at Duke University next season, but with safeguards in place to try to prevent scandals like the one that sidelined the program this year. Duke president Richard Brodhead yesterday reinstated the team, saying the move was "probationary" depending on how well the players follow the new rules. "This announcement is not risk-free on my part. I am taking a gamble" by restarting men's lacrosse, Brodhead said at a campus news conference. The players, he said, drafted their own set of standards for off-the-field behavior.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2003
Student government representatives from Howard County high schools outlined vastly different improvement efforts and goals for the year - from ending dirty dancing to promoting diversity - during a luncheon yesterday with top education officials. "This is truly an alignment that we've been fostering and promoting for a number of years," said Assistant Superintendent Roger L. Plunkett, pleased that the students' objectives were in line with the administration's. "I'm confident that you can make a tremendous difference."
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2003
ELM GROVE, Wis. - Only a year ago, Andrea Prasse was a star at the elite Air Force Academy. In the top third of her class with a high-ranking leadership position, she was soon to graduate and begin training as a fighter pilot. Now she's a woman of 22 who has no diploma, is an outcast among her former classmates and has been the subject of death threats over the Internet. Officially, she was found guilty of violating the academy's sacrosanct honor code that enjoins cadets not to lie, cheat, steal or tolerate others who do so. But worse, in the eyes of many at the academy, she has spoken out against a fellow student and an institution that expects absolute loyalty.
NEWS
By Kate Zernike and Kate Zernike,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 2002
DURHAM, N.C. - Like most other college students, Eric Rogers knows that submitting a term paper taken off the Internet is outright plagiarism, cause for suspension or a failing grade. What about using a paragraph? "Just a paragraph?" he said. Beneath a Duke cap worn backward, he pondered. "A big paragraph or a small paragraph?" "Taking a paragraph and changing words, I've done that before; it wasn't a big deal," he decided finally. "As long as I can manipulate it to be my words, change a few, it's not cheating."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | September 26, 2000
THE CONCEPT of honor seems dated these days, when the definitions of right and wrong are parsed and spun. An honor code sounds like something students would find only at a military college, where young people are taught that trust can mean life or death in combat. An honor code at a Catholic women's college? That sounds as dated as white gloves, as redundant as scheduling mass on Sunday. But the young women at Baltimore's College of Notre Dame do not appear to think so. The honor code there, in place since 1936, is not further restraint but long-sought liberation - freedom from the expectation that they will lie, cheat or steal.
TOPIC
By Terry A. Dalton | July 16, 2000
When two department colleagues of mine were hit by a rash of cheating incidents near the end of the spring semester this year, my reaction was one of surprise and sympathy, but with a measure of smugness mixed in, I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit. As the lone journalism professor in a 10-member English department, I had persuaded myself that the safeguards I had set up were sufficient to prevent plagiarism and other forms of cheating on writing assignments. Boy, was I wrong. Before relating my own horror story, I should point out that the six instances of plagiarism that sent my two friends reeling in mid-April were all committed by first-year students who had pilfered the essays they handed in from the Internet.
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