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NEWS
October 2, 2014
When people don't have enough work, protests and demonstrations happen. And it's a worldwide epidemic with dire consequences. Take a look at the Middle East - throngs of "pro-democracy" youth took to the streets to oppose their country's leaders. Then consider the results - horrendous. America definitely must stay away from this "pro-democracy" effort - our track record so far has been dreadful. Studying the images of the Hong Kong protesters, I'm reminded of our own "Occupy" movement ( "Hong Kong protesters stockpile supplies, fear fresh police advance," Sept.
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NEWS
October 2, 2014
When people don't have enough work, protests and demonstrations happen. And it's a worldwide epidemic with dire consequences. Take a look at the Middle East - throngs of "pro-democracy" youth took to the streets to oppose their country's leaders. Then consider the results - horrendous. America definitely must stay away from this "pro-democracy" effort - our track record so far has been dreadful. Studying the images of the Hong Kong protesters, I'm reminded of our own "Occupy" movement ( "Hong Kong protesters stockpile supplies, fear fresh police advance," Sept.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
The twin tasks of improving relations between Washington and Beijing and shrinking the enormous U.S. trade deficit to a manageable size depend to a large degree on China importing more American goods and services. That's partly the job of Donald Tong. As Hong Kong's commissioner for economic and trade affairs in the United States, Tong has the task of building trans-Pacific ties and promoting that special Chinese administrative district as a destination for U.S. exports, not just a source of imports.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Maryland alumnus Justin Benedik enjoyed a successful trip to the recently completed 12th World Wushu Championships in Malaysia, finishing fourth in compulsory changquan (long fist), 15th in gun shu (staff) and 32nd in dao shu (broadsword) last weekend. It was the first appearance in the world championships for Benedik, 27, who competed despite being hampered by a stress fracture in his sacroiliac joint and a sports hernia. "The competition was a great experience," Benedik said.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013
Hong Kong residents experienced the effects of an earthquake nearby. Meanwhile, the Internet is coldly ignoring Baltimore's lack of an NBA team today, heartlessly blabbing on about the league's just-passed trade deadline. Welcome to your online trends report for Friday, Feb. 22. An earthquake in southern China created an unusual stir in Hong Kong, which usually does not noticeably feel the effect of such tremors. The 4.8-magnitude quake struck about 110 miles north of the city. Relatively nearby, India and Australia were battling out a cricket test, gaining substantial worldwide Twitter attention.
NEWS
September 9, 1994
Hong Kong was a British colony without an elected government in 1984 when Britain agreed in cede it to China in 1997, in return for China's respecting its institutions. Capitalism and personal rights were part of the deal. Democratic reforms promulgated since by the current British governor, Tory politician Chris Patten, were not.So the vote of China's Standing Committee of the National People's Congress -- to disband in 1997 the Hong Kong legislature that will be wholly elected for the first time next year -- does not violate the letter of the 1984 accord.
NEWS
October 4, 2002
SINCE CHINA took back Hong Kong from British colonial rule, the forces eroding its residents' liberties have been less like the typhoons regularly blowing in from the South China Sea and more like the insidious pink-hued clouds of pollution that often envelope the territory's islands, thanks to mainland factories. Along with Singapore, Hong Kong still sits atop various worldwide rankings of relative economic freedoms, but under Chinese rule its economy has become ever more linked to the mainland -- and its political system ever more under Beijing's thumb.
NEWS
September 10, 2003
CHINA'S SURPRISE announcement last week that it is dropping its drive to enact a vaguely worded and much feared set of internal security laws for Hong Kong is very welcome, though with a good dose of caution. On the face of it, the sudden turnabout appears to be a notable victory for oppressed Chinese desires for democracy. But Beijing seldom yields on political control, and so this appears much more of a strategic retreat than a declaration of defeat. Still, this summer's standoff over the proposed changes to Hong Kong's security law has been stirring.
NEWS
December 26, 2005
It is obviously very tempting to celebrate any successful political action by Hong Kong's dedicated corps of democracy activists. And at first glance, the legislative defeat last week of a Beijing-backed package of modest political reforms was a rare victory for the territory's pro-democracy forces. But it might ultimately prove to be a big setback on the path toward their ultimate goal: universal suffrage. The defeated reform package, pushed hard by Beijing, would have doubled the size of the appointed committee that selects Hong Kong's chief executive and enlarged its legislature, only half elected by the public.
BUSINESS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 5, 1991
PANAMA CITY -- Is Panama City about to become Hong Kong West?Immigration officials were astounded recently when as many as 8,000 Hong Kong Chinese expressed an interest in Panama's little-used policy of granting a passport to anybody willing to put $80,000 in the national bank for five years.The passports appeal to Hong Kong businessmen made nervous by China's takeover of the British colony in 1997, say members of the long-established Chinese community in Panama.Despite Beijing's promise that no changes will be made in Hong Kong's freewheeling way of life and trade before 2047, the switch of sovereignty could generate a westward-bound rush of cash from the Far East's financial capital.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2013
During the long Cold War between the United States and the former Soviet Union, when a spy from either side defected he was said to be "coming in from the cold. " In the evolving case of Edward Snowden, the self-described whistleblower on National Security Agency secrets, he seems to be having an uncommonly difficult time accomplishing it. His flight from his NSA surveillance job in Hawaii to Hong Kong, while causing shock and distress to the Obama administration, at first came off as another example of a fed-up insider deciding his country was in the wrong and letting let his conscience be his guide.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
The longer former National Security Agency contract employee Edward Snowden stays holed up in the transit area of Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport while Russian President Vladimir Putin cynically proclaims him a martyr to freedom of speech and expression, the less Mr. Snowden looks like a hero and the more he looks like a traitor, a spy and a rogue employee intent on betraying his country's secrets for the self-aggrandizing rewards of...
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A young man comes to Maryland, takes some community college classes, uses his computer skills to get a job in which he gains a security clearance. Still in his 20s, he finds information about government activity that troubles him. He decides to share it with the world. In its broad outlines, the case of Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old intelligence contractor who last week revealed the existence of two top secret National Security Agency eavesdropping programs, hews closely to the contours set by Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the 25-year-old soldier now being court-martialed at Fort Meade for releasing hundreds of thousands of classified documents.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013
Hong Kong residents experienced the effects of an earthquake nearby. Meanwhile, the Internet is coldly ignoring Baltimore's lack of an NBA team today, heartlessly blabbing on about the league's just-passed trade deadline. Welcome to your online trends report for Friday, Feb. 22. An earthquake in southern China created an unusual stir in Hong Kong, which usually does not noticeably feel the effect of such tremors. The 4.8-magnitude quake struck about 110 miles north of the city. Relatively nearby, India and Australia were battling out a cricket test, gaining substantial worldwide Twitter attention.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
As a teenager attending a Catholic school in Hong Kong in the 1960s, Carolyn Y. Woo never imagined that her studies were helping prepare her to one day lead Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, one of the world's largest international humanitarian relief agencies. Woo took over this month as CRS' chief executive officer and president, replacing 18-year veteran Ken Hackett. Woo, 57, brings an academic and business background to her job, having most recently served as dean of the University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Colts legend Art Donovan never thought he'd get his ring back. The cherished keepsake of the 1958 NFL championship game — often called "the greatest game ever played" — was stolen from a Hong Kong hotel room in 1977. Donovan assumed it was gone forever. But 34 years later, the ring has been returned to its rightful owner after it showed up for sale on the Internet. A Howard County police detective followed up on a tip and found the ring, engraved with the defensive tackle's name and jersey number, listed for $25,000 on Craigslist.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | April 1, 2011
Andrea Keating was 27 and working for a creative staffing agency in Washington, D.C., when the economy took a turn for the worse. But instead of agonizing over her job security, Keating took control of her destiny and quit to launch a business of her own. “I did it because in my gut I knew it was going to work,” says Keating, about her decision 23 years ago to start Crews Control, a business that provides local camera crews for corporate video...
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | December 5, 2010
The public library in Pingwen, a rural village in southern China, is also a Communist pantheon. Images of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin, Mao and Deng look out from a plaster wall at shelves of multicolored agriculture literature. But that socialist sextet wouldn't recognize what's going on outside. Instead of working for the Communist state, the village's 643 families control their own land, choose which crops to grow and earn profits from their toil. Sometimes they lease hectares to private corporations.
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