Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHong
IN THE NEWS

Hong

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 2, 2004
FOR DECADES, the line on Hong Kong was that it was merely an economic city, not a political one. If there was truth to that under the firm hand of British colonialism, it is no longer so under the blunt rule of China's nominal communists. These days, Hong Kong is forging a broader identity of its own - with a vital political struggle that deserves more overt U.S. support. A year ago, on the sixth anniversary of China's takeover, a half-million Hong Kong residents donned black to march in its streets in an impressive show of their democratic aspirations aimed at Beijing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 2, 2014
When people don't have enough work, protests and demonstrations happen. And it's a worldwide epidemic with dire consequences. Take a look at the Middle East - throngs of "pro-democracy" youth took to the streets to oppose their country's leaders. Then consider the results - horrendous. America definitely must stay away from this "pro-democracy" effort - our track record so far has been dreadful. Studying the images of the Hong Kong protesters, I'm reminded of our own "Occupy" movement ( "Hong Kong protesters stockpile supplies, fear fresh police advance," Sept.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 30, 1991
A Millersville man pleaded guilty yesterday to murdering his wife during an argument in February in the couple's home.Chang Pyo Hong,who had been charged with first-degree murder, pleaded guilty in county Circuit Court to second-degree murder. In exchange, Hong, 51, will serve no more than 15 years in prison.Hong pleaded guilty in connection with the Feb. 15, 1991, shooting death of his wife, Young Ja Hong, in their home in the 700 block ofLive Oak Drive. The 48-year-old woman was pronounced dead at the scene after being shot four times with a .380 Beretta, said Assistant State's Attorney William C. Mulford II.Hong is scheduled to be sentenced Jan. 6.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A young man comes to Maryland, takes some community college classes, uses his computer skills to get a job in which he gains a security clearance. Still in his 20s, he finds information about government activity that troubles him. He decides to share it with the world. In its broad outlines, the case of Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old intelligence contractor who last week revealed the existence of two top secret National Security Agency eavesdropping programs, hews closely to the contours set by Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the 25-year-old soldier now being court-martialed at Fort Meade for releasing hundreds of thousands of classified documents.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 9, 1999
CHESSIE RACING, the Chesapeake region's first ever entry in the grueling 1997-1998 Whitbread Round the World Race, has been sold to a Hong Kong yachtsman for $500,000. You didn't hear this scuttlebutt? Don't feel bad. Neither the Living Classrooms Foundation, owner of the 65-foot racing boat, nor George Collins, the retired T. Rowe Price CEO who invested $7 million in Chessie and its Whitbread effort, announced the sale.Parker Rockefeller, senior vice president of Living Classrooms, says the sale took place in February, after he, Collins and former Chessie helmsman Gavin Brady met for dinner in Florida with Karl Kwok, an Asian businessman acclaimed as Hong Kong's premier yachtsman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2003
HONG KONG - Health officials announced here last night the death of a 2-year-old boy from anthrax but said the case did not appear to involve biological terrorism. The anthrax appears to have entered the boy orally, first affecting the back of his throat, and does not appear to have been inhaled, said Dr. Tse Lai-yin of the Hong Kong Health Department's disease prevention and control division. Terrorists would be more likely to disperse anthrax in such a way that victims would inhale it, not ingest it, she said.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
Edward K. Wu, retired translator, reporter and office administrator in The Sun's Hong Kong Bureau for many years, died of lymphoma Tuesday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 77 and lived in Berwyn Heights.Mr. Wu, considered a master translator and China watcher, joined The Sun's Hong Kong Bureau in 1966. He retired in 1980 and moved to Silver Spring."He was one of those rare individuals who could actually listen to Chairman Mao Tse-tung on the radio and understand what he was saying.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | July 14, 1992
LANTAU ISLAND, Hong Kong -- This is about an exceptionally savvy monk, a really big buddha and some curious dealings.The Buddhist monk, the Rev. Sik Chi Wai, chief executive of the Po Lin Monastery here, has a moon-shaped face accentuated by black half-circles under his eyes. He's what the Chinese call a "political monk."His business card lists leadership posts with a dozen groups. His confident air bears more in common with, say, Ross Perot than the detachment advised by the 6th-century B.C. Indian prince known as Buddha.
NEWS
By Jennifer Lin and Jennifer Lin,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1997
MACAU -- Macau is what Hong Kong is not.Hong Kong is fast, modern and brash, a world-class commercial center, blessed with one of the best deep-water ports in the world. Macau, a Portuguese-run enclave an hour away by ferry, got an airport only two years ago. It has just built its first skyscraper -- the 40-story headquarters for the Bank of China. Hong Kong makes its living off trade and international finance; Macau, from casinos and a tawdry nightlife.But the two places have one very significant thing in common.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
BEIJING -- When Hong Kong returned to China 19 months ago in a blaze of fireworks and tearful farewells, many feared that the mainland would trample free speech and human rights in the free-wheeling former British colony.Instead, the territory and its motherland now find themselves on the brink of a constitutional crisis over a matter even dearer to the hearts of Hong Kong's business-minded people: the rule of law.The conflict, the biggest since the July 1997 handover, revolves around a ruling last month by Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeal that would allow tens of thousands of mainland children with Hong Kong parents to live in the territory.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013
Hong Kong residents experienced the effects of an earthquake nearby. Meanwhile, the Internet is coldly ignoring Baltimore's lack of an NBA team today, heartlessly blabbing on about the league's just-passed trade deadline. Welcome to your online trends report for Friday, Feb. 22. An earthquake in southern China created an unusual stir in Hong Kong, which usually does not noticeably feel the effect of such tremors. The 4.8-magnitude quake struck about 110 miles north of the city. Relatively nearby, India and Australia were battling out a cricket test, gaining substantial worldwide Twitter attention.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Colts legend Art Donovan never thought he'd get his ring back. The cherished keepsake of the 1958 NFL championship game — often called "the greatest game ever played" — was stolen from a Hong Kong hotel room in 1977. Donovan assumed it was gone forever. But 34 years later, the ring has been returned to its rightful owner after it showed up for sale on the Internet. A Howard County police detective followed up on a tip and found the ring, engraved with the defensive tackle's name and jersey number, listed for $25,000 on Craigslist.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | April 1, 2011
Andrea Keating was 27 and working for a creative staffing agency in Washington, D.C., when the economy took a turn for the worse. But instead of agonizing over her job security, Keating took control of her destiny and quit to launch a business of her own. “I did it because in my gut I knew it was going to work,” says Keating, about her decision 23 years ago to start Crews Control, a business that provides local camera crews for corporate video...
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
The twin tasks of improving relations between Washington and Beijing and shrinking the enormous U.S. trade deficit to a manageable size depend to a large degree on China importing more American goods and services. That's partly the job of Donald Tong. As Hong Kong's commissioner for economic and trade affairs in the United States, Tong has the task of building trans-Pacific ties and promoting that special Chinese administrative district as a destination for U.S. exports, not just a source of imports.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2010
Baltimore-based FTI Consulting Inc. said Thursday that it is expanding in Asia with the acquisition of a Hong Kong firm. Like FTI, Baker Tilly Hong Kong Business Recovery Ltd. specializes in forensic accounting, litigation support and corporate restructuring. FTI, which did not disclose what it is paying, said the firm will change its name to FTI Consulting (Asia) Ltd. - Jamie Smith Hopkins
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | January 25, 2009
This week marks the beginning of the Chinese New Year, and there's no better place to celebrate the start of the lunar calendar than in Hong Kong. 2009 is the year of the Ox - people born under this sign include President Barack Obama. Hong Kong is one of CheapTickets.com's value destinations for the year, offering savings of 59 percent on lodging this month. The city offers cultural riches for any visitor. Hong Kong is divided into several districts, including Kowloon peninsula, Hong Kong Island and the New Territories.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 1997
HONG KONG -- The fireworks display and laser light show for Hong Kong's handover was billed as one of the great spectacles of its kind.But when the pyrotechnics left some people unimpressed, a Hong Kong resident suggested that recently arrived soldiers from China's People's Liberation Army had made off with some of the explosives and sold them.It was just a joke, but it said a lot about what concerns people here after China resumed control of the territory. While some in the West are worried about the erosion of free speech and democracy, the greatest fear of Hong Kong residents is increased corruption.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall and Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2004
HONG KONG - Tens of thousands of demonstrators crowded into a Hong Kong park yesterday to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre with a candlelight vigil, songs and exhortations to build a democratic China. Organizers said 82,000 people attended the event, while police put the number at closer to 50,000. The crowd, which included many families and young people, stretched the quarter-mile length of Hong Kong's Victoria Park. In Beijing, police equipped with metal detectors and nightsticks guarded every entrance to the Chinese capital's main square, but the number of visitors was lighter than usual because of intermittent drizzle throughout much of the day. No violence was reported in either city.
NEWS
August 23, 2007
On August 21, 2007 Dr. Hong Jun Kim, practiced in Aberdeen, MD for 20 years in internal medicine. Beloved husband of Shin Ki Kim (nee Chang); devoted father of Young Kim, Fred Kim, Sara Kim, and Julia Kim; dear son of Hyung Kim and the late Myoung Kim (nee Oh). A funeral service will be celebrated at Calvary Presbyterian Korean Church, 6800 Loch Raven Blvd., on Thursday, 8/23 at 11:00 AM. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens. Arrangements by the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | August 18, 2007
Laureate Education Inc. shares traded for the last time on the Nasdaq stock market yesterday, ending its nearly 14-year run as a public company. The Baltimore operator of online and foreign universities announced last night that a management-led investor group completed its $3.82 billion deal to take the company private. The transaction's closure is a "wonderful capstone to the long period as a public company," said Douglas L. Becker, chairman and chief executive officer, who is scheduled to relocate to Hong Kong today to establish the company's Asian headquarters.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.