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By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 9, 1994
Honeywell Inc. will spend $6.5 million to settle a 20-year-old discrimination case that affected more than 6,000 female factory workers between 1972 and 1977.U.S. Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich announced yesterday that Honeywell agreed to pay $3.5 million in back wages and interest to 6,367 women or their estates, and to spend an additional $3 million during the next five years on diversity programs."We felt it was in the best interest of everyone involved not to prolong an issue that had dragged on for 20 years," said Honeywell spokeswoman Meta Gaertnier.
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NEWS
December 8, 2013
The recent commentary, "Harbor Point environmental questions," (Dec. 2), may lead The Sun's readers to believe that additional studies are necessary before work can begin on the proposed redevelopment there. In fact, these suggested studies have nothing to with the proposed redevelopment, which the authors recognize will be safe. "We are not saying that development of this site will result in meaningful human health and/or ecological risks," the authors state. It also is important to note that the federal consent decree for the cleanup of the former Baltimore Works site mandates that construction not jeopardize the integrity of the remedy and that detailed plans be approved by federal and state agencies.
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BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1999
Creating a major new player in aerospace and defense electronics, AlliedSignal Inc. said yesterday that it has signed an agreement to purchase Honeywell Inc. for about $14.8 billion worth of stock based on yesterday's closing prices.The merger will produce an industrial conglomerate with $25 billion in annual sales. The new company will adopt the more recognizable Honeywell name, but will occupy AlliedSignal's headquarters in Morristown, N.J.Honeywell has been based in Minnesota for more than 100 years, while the AlliedSignal name dates to a 1985 merger.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
A meeting to address residents' concerns over environmental hazards on the site of the proposed Harbor Point development has been delayed because of the federal government shutdown. The meeting had been scheduled for Monday at neighbors' demands, but Environmental Protection Agency officials will not be able to attend because they have been furloughed, said City Councilman James Kraft, who organized the meeting. The controversial Harbor Point development, slated to house energy company Exelon Corp.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2000
General Electric Co. has made an offer to buy Honeywell International Inc., executives close to the talks said yesterday, scuttling a bid by United Technologies Corp. General Electric likely would keep some of Honeywell's businesses but sell other parts of the company, the executives said. Details of General Electric's offer were not immediately available. United Technologies, an old-style conglomerate that makes everything from jet engines to elevators, had offered to buy Honeywell for about $40.3 billion in stock but called off the talks after it learned another suitor had emerged.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | September 1, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- In the largest patent-infringement verdict ever, Litton Industries won $1.2 billion in Los Angeles federal court yesterday on allegations that Honeywell Inc. stole its technology for coating mirrors used in aircraft navigation systems.Litton officials said they believed the award would largely stand against legal challenges, though U.S. District Judge Mariana Pfaelzer, who heard the case, must still rule on Honeywell's assertion that Litton improperly obtained the patent.Honeywell General Counsel Edward D. Grayson said he was "outraged" by the verdict and said subsequent rulings or appeals might eliminate the award altogether.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2006
A community group is trying to force a New Jersey-based manufacturing company to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to remove a cancer-causing chemical from a state-owned shipping center on the Baltimore waterfront. Organizers of Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) said they want Honeywell International Inc. to remove millions of cubic yards of chromium - waste from a former chrome factory - from beneath the Dundalk Marine Terminal, where it was dumped decades ago to fill wetlands.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
A decision by European regulators yesterday to derail a merger between General Electric Co. and Honeywell International Inc. may revive a plan to build housing and offices on a toxic waste site in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Honeywell, which owns the land, had agreed to explore a $300 million project proposed by local developers. The site near Caroline Street contains buried waste from a former AlliedSignal Corp. chromium ore plant. At 27 acres, it is the harbor front's largest undeveloped parcel.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1996
Two years into a seven-year, $10 million contract with Honeywell Corp. to conserve energy in 80 schools, the Board of Education has yet to realize the savings originally envisioned.Savings have fallen short of what was anticipated by $800,000 -- including more than $562,000 in fiscal 1995 -- and are expected to come up short again for the current fiscal year.Under terms of the contract, Honeywell must pay the school system the difference if savings fall short of projections."They are writing the checks.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | April 25, 2007
The Maryland Department of the Environment ordered Baltimore officials and a private company yesterday to begin immediately planning for a broad investigation into the extent of the arsenic pollution at a long-shuttered South Baltimore plant and an adjacent public park, which was closed last week after high levels of the poison were discovered in the soil. Swann Park is next to an industrial site where the former Allied Chemical Corp. used arsenic to make pesticides before closing in 1976.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Decades after first discovering the problem, state officials have settled on a $27 million plan to keep a cancer-causing chemical in the ground at the Dundalk Marine Terminal from seeping into the Patapsco River and blowing into nearby residential areas. Under the plan, Honeywell International Inc. and the Maryland Port Administration jointly pledged to re-line leaky storm drains beneath the state-owned shipping facility, which have run yellow at times with chromium-tainted water. They also vowed to see that pavement covering the contaminated soil remains intact so it can't become airborne.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | March 9, 2008
Jake Brody, a senior at Glenelg Country School, has been named one of the state's top six volunteers in the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. The Laurel resident is a finalist in the nationwide competition for his efforts to raise awareness about juvenile diabetes. "It's great to be nominated for anything that gets my project out to the greater public," the 17-year-old said. "It's very prestigious and to be considered in the applicant pool is pretty great." In 2006, Brody launched the Happy Fund in honor of a young African girl named Happy who died because she could not test her blood sugar.
NEWS
October 22, 2007
Baltimore officials and Honeywell International have submitted a proposal to restore use of Swann Park in the next several months. They admit that the proposal, while more than adequate, could certainly be better. That's why it's incumbent on the Maryland Department of the Environment to review the proposal thoroughly and to give its approval only if it is convinced that putting good soil over bad will bring the park back to life without posing a health risk. Honeywell is seeking, in part, to atone for the misleading statements of the former Allied Chemical Co., which for years operated a pesticide-producing plant next to the park in South Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,sun reporter | June 27, 2007
Peter G. Angelos built one fortune out of asbestos. He earned a second off Big Tobacco. Could he build yet a third out of arsenic? If he doesn't, it won't be for lack of trying. The Baltimore lawyer, who parlayed his cutting-edge role representing workers who were exposed to asbestos into the ownership of the Baltimore Orioles, has placed advertisements in The Sun trolling for possible clients who might have been harmed by arsenic in South Baltimore's Swann Park. "If you or members of your family have regularly visited Swann Park or have lived near Swann Park, you may wish to consult an attorney," says the Angelos ad, which also offers a "no-charge consultation."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | June 12, 2007
Maryland's environmental agency has discovered high levels of arsenic in the yards of homes near a contaminated park in South Baltimore and has ordered a company to remove the poison. The arsenic dust, a carcinogen linked to elevated lung cancer rates, is believed to have drifted from a long-closed Allied Chemical pesticide factory into nearby patios and backyards, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. The toxic dust was found earlier in Swann Park next to the former plant.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | May 24, 2007
Baltimore officials yesterday approved a consent agreement with a New Jersey-based manufacturing company that will require the firm to study the pollution at its former pesticide plant in South Baltimore and propose a way to stop the leaking of dangerous chemicals. The agreement between the city and Honeywell International was required by the Maryland Department of the Environment to address problems at the site of the former plant at 2000 Race St. Arsenic dust made its way into adjacent Swann Park, requiring the city to close the recreation area.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
Budget officials hate surprises - especially when they mean having to write big checks - which is why Howard County's fiscal watchdogs are a bit glum this week. Two checks are scheduled to go out Friday for a combined $654,000 property-tax refund to Giant Food and Honeywell International for errors they made in the past several years in providing information to state assessment officials. "It was a big surprise to me. You just have no idea when these cases are going to come to an end," said Sharon Greisz, deputy county finance director.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 2, 1993
A Las Vegas, Nev., company that lured Marylanders with the prospect of a "millionaire's treasure" must part with some of its own under an agreement reached with the state attorney general's office.The company, Honeywell & Roberts Inc., which sponsors prize contests, has agreed to stop sending "deceptive solicitations" to Maryland residents and will pay $16,175 into a restitution fund for Marylanders who sent illegal "judging fees" to the company, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. announced yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | May 7, 2007
Arsenic-laced Swann Park is one of several places along Baltimore's waterfront where carcinogenic wastes from long-closed Allied Chemical Co. plants are reappearing like ghosts from the city's industrial past. Officials at the Maryland Department of the Environment say they are pushing Allied's successor company, New Jersey-based Honeywell International, to clean up or contain pollution left by Allied's pesticide factory in South Baltimore and chrome plant in Fells Point. Chrome waste and other chemicals taint not only the vacant plant sites, but also dumping grounds in Dundalk, Fairfield, Locust Point and near North Point in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | April 27, 2007
As assessments and plans for a clean-up begin on the arsenic contamination at South Baltimore's Swann Park, the city health commissioner said last night that testing of people who might have been exposed to the poisonous chemical remains undecided. Responding to questions at a community meeting last night, Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein said there will not be mass urine testing.
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