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NEWS
August 3, 2004
On Saturday, July 31, 2004, GERALYN "Honey" DOWLING, 49, died unexpectedly at her home. She was born on April 4, 1955. A dedicated and loving daughter, Geralyn is survived by her parents, Helen and Edmund Dowling. Also surviving are sisters, Barbara Hughes of Baltimore and Janet Dowling of Skyesville and brother Matt Dowling of Westminster, niece, Erin and nephew, Brett Hughes of Baltimore, nephews, Jake and Zach and niece Emily Dowling of Westminster, brother Edmund Dowling Jr., predeceased her. Geralyn graduated from UMBC with a degree in Political Science and Dundalk Community College with an Associate degree in Paralegal Studies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Julekha Dash and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
In search of a sustainable art medium, visual artist Kara Brook bought a beehive six years ago so she could use beeswax to paint. She quickly discovered that those same bees could be the source of a sustainable business as well. She started packaging the honey and then expanded into making what she calls “bee-inspired products.” Today, Brook collects honey from her 18 hives on her 102-acre Kent Island farm to produce home and beauty products, including candles, soaps, exfoliating scrubs and lip balms.
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FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
Something is killing the honey bees of Maryland. Close to 60 percent of the managed hives died last fall and over the winter - about twice the national average, according to the state bee inspector and local keepers. "I had a healthy hive that produced 50 pounds of honey last year, and we were anticipating another great year," said Stephen Christianson, a Mount Washington beekeeper of three years. "Then, they were just gone. It took my breath away. " Some blame inexperience on the part of the beekeepers, most of whom tend their hives as a hobby, coupled with a bad winter.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
As Nathan Reid wandered around his Canton neighborhood, he saw threats everywhere. Empty tree wells, weedy window boxes and flowers that bloomed and died before the end of summer - unkind conditions for the fuzzy, buzzing set. "I want homeowners to become more conscientious gardeners," he told a room full of his neighbors Sunday afternoon. "Honeybees depend on it. " The honeybee enthusiast - or honeybee steward, as he prefers to be called - gathered about 30 people in the basement of a church to emphasize the need to save the insects, which not only produce honey, but also pollinate plants and help in the growing of close to a third of the world's crops.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | January 21, 2004
Looking for a sweet gift idea for your valentine? How about giving your honey a set of artisanal honey from www.beehivebee products.com? The set comes with nine single-ounce vials corked and sealed with beeswax. Varieties include orange blossom, buckwheat and raspberry. The set is accompanied by a wooden display block and a detailed description of each honey. Price is $45 plus $9 for shipping. Whisks that work wonders Whether you're mixing a salad dressing or frothing a cup of hot chocolate, kitchen toolmaker Kuhn Rikon has a whisk for you. The company's new collection includes the Galaxy Spring Whisk, a 10-inch-long tool designed to whip up small amounts of heavy cream or make lump-free pancake batter.
FEATURES
By Marcy Goldman | September 1, 1991
As the sun sets next Sunday night, those celebrating the Jewish New Year 5752, Rosh Hashana, turn their thoughts to the year that has passed and the new one that awaits.Early autumn brings the Jewish Days of Awe, commencing with Rosh Hashana and culminating with the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur. It is a time of reflection and assessment, filled with joy and solemnity. It is a time to review one's merits and one's pitfalls and to re-commit to a positive life course. For many, Rosh Hashana memories include the squeaky feel of black patent shoes or a rustling new holiday dress, the timeless New Year's services and songs, Hebrew school snacks of honey and apple slices, and theheady scent of Indian summer that pervades the warm, familial gatherings.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 21, 2002
HONEYBEES WILL make sweet fun at the annual Honey Harvest Festival at Hashawha Environmental Center, where visitors will find entertainment and great food with a dose of history and education. Sponsored by Carroll County Beekeepers Association, the event Sept. 8 focuses public attention on the value of honeybees. Bee products will be available, including honey ice cream, honey pit beef and honey ham, and baked goods made with or slathered in honey. The festival begins at 10:30 a.m. with a honey pancake brunch that continues until closing at 4 p.m. The cost for the brunch is $3. Entrance to the festival is $2 per vehicle.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | June 27, 1992
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- P.C.B. Enterprises, Inc.'s Nobel's Honey, an impressive seven-length winner against a field of $75,000 claimers June 5 at Belmont Park, heads a field of eight fillies and mares scheduled to go in tonight's $25,000-added Blue And Gold Stakes at the Charles Town Races.The seven-furlong distaff is restricted to 3-year-olds and upward, registered W. Va.-bred, sired or raised.Nobel's Honey, a 3-year-old daughter of Noble Nashua out of Here Comes Patsy, was an easy winner against allowance fillies in her last start at Charles Town Feb. 23. Before that, she captured last fall's $25,000 Budweiser Breeders Classic, which showcases the mountain state's 2-year-old fillies.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | February 27, 2008
Meli (1636 Thames St., 410-534-6354), which rhymes with "belly" and means "honey" in Greek, has just opened in Fells Point; and it couldn't be sweeter. Honey is a theme that runs throughout, not just in the patisserie attached to the restaurant and lounge. Gourmet honey is used in various dishes, from the lavender-infused honey that glazes the salmon ($18) to the Italian strawberry honey on the pork tenderloin with quail eggs and crispy potatoes ($19). Everything on the menu, says managing partner Kenneth Petty, is priced under $20. This is the third in the Kali's Restaurant Group, along with Kali's Court and Mezze.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 17, 1992
They may have blown up the kid, but they shrunk the script.There's hardly anything to "Honey, I Blew Up the Kid"; it's about 80 minutes of big baby jokes, pratfalls and process photography. And yet for all its primitiveness, the movie is quite amusing. Or, possibly, because of all its primitiveness, it's amusing.If you've seen the ads, you've seen the movie. There's no reason for it to be 80 minutes long since there's no formal arc to the story. It could have been 80 seconds long or 80 hours long, depending on how many times the big baby steps on trucks.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
It all started in the kitchen. That's where Jamyla Bennu first mixed up batches of hair and skin products to give to friends and relatives more than 13 years ago. Since then, Bennu has refined her creations of organic shea butter and aloe vera juice, coconut oil and honey. She and her husband, writer and filmmaker Pierre Bennu, have slowly built their company, Oyin Handmade, from the ground up, building connections on social media and wooing a loyal customer base through online sales.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
Discover the busy world of bees and other pollinators at the Maryland Honey Harvest Festival, Saturday, Sept. 21 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the National Wildlife Visitor Center, 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop. Join the Maryland State Beekeepers Association as they celebrate this annual event. Enjoy arts and crafts, honey tastings, candle making demonstrations, product sales and Refuge habitat tram tours (fee). Refreshments will be available for purchase. 301-497-5580.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Really Raw Honey is known for its straight-from-the-hive product, a creamy white treat sold online and in hundreds of stores like Whole Foods. But the buzz about the Highlandtown-based company this week involved handguns, rifles, ammunition and cocaine Baltimore police say were seized in raids on the firm's warehouse and its owner's North Baltimore home. Owner Frantz Walker was charged with armed drug trafficking and held at Central Booking on $1 million bail until he posted bond Wednesday morning.
FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
Something is killing the honey bees of Maryland. Close to 60 percent of the managed hives died last fall and over the winter - about twice the national average, according to the state bee inspector and local keepers. "I had a healthy hive that produced 50 pounds of honey last year, and we were anticipating another great year," said Stephen Christianson, a Mount Washington beekeeper of three years. "Then, they were just gone. It took my breath away. " Some blame inexperience on the part of the beekeepers, most of whom tend their hives as a hobby, coupled with a bad winter.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
From many little yellow peeps, one artistic family saw a giant yellow bird. At the sixth annual "Peep Show" in downtown Westminster, the massive 3,810-marshmallow-strong Big Bird drew the biggest oohs and ahhs among the young kids and older fans who filled the Carroll County Arts Council building on Main Street Saturday, all there to take in a host of candy-inspired creations. The "Long Live Sesame Peep" display, complete with a trash-canned Oscar the Grouch, was created by Robert Mondor and his family - wife Ann, son Sean, 10, and daughter Lauren, 8, all of Westminster - and was just one of many pop-culture-inspired displays at the Easter event, which has become a major fundraiser for the council each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
“I'm 27. I'm retired. But I still want to compete.” That's Olympic champion Michael Phelps talking in “The Haney Project,” a Golf Channel series that stars Tiger Woods' one-time coach taking on a new celebrity student each season. Phelps' words pretty much summarize the premise of this year's edition, which starts Monday night. In the past, Hank Haney's celebrity pupils have included Ray Romano, Rush Limbaugh, Charles Barkley and Maroon 5 singer Adam Levine. This season, the student is the swimmer from Baltimore who won 18 gold medals in Olympic competition.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | August 14, 2008
I work with animals. We had a dog rip out her stitches to a point where closure was not an option. Our veterinarian placed honey on a dressing and bandaged up our little beagle. A day later, the wound looked much better! Honey has been used for thousands of years to help heal wounds. A recent article demonstrated that medical-grade honey kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria (Clinical Infectious Diseases, June 1, 2008). When applied to the forearm, this Dutch honey (Revamil) kept germs from growing on the skin.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | February 21, 2008
McCormick & Co. Inc. is continuing its shopping spree. The Sparks-based spice maker announced late yesterday that it bought Canada's largest honey company for $75 million in cash, about two times Billy Bee Honey Products Ltd.'s annual sales of $37 million. The deal adds to a list of companies McCormick has snapped up during the past five years, solidifying a strategy of buying well-known brands that aim to make customers' lives easier by simplifying the cooking process and adding flavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | February 21, 2013
Back from Tribal Council, Brandon is terribly upset about the fact that Francesca went home. He calls himself a Honey Badger, but loses points with me because he doesn't then say "Brandon don't care, Brandon don't give a... " Dawn, because she's too nice and doesn't realize that it was the Crazy talking, and not Brandon, is very upset and hurt by what he said to her. I like Dawn, but I think she will end up leaving about mid-point in the game because...
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Stan Honey has spent much of the past two decades living a double life - as a computer graphics innovator who made televised sports more easily watchable for the casual fan and as a master yachtsman who navigated large boats to a long list of nautical accomplishments. Honey (pronounced HO-nee), who was inducted this month into the National Sailing Hall of Fame, has finally been able to combine his two seemingly unrelated passions - given that one is usually accomplished sitting in an office while the other takes place on the open seas - in what he has called a "perfect job. " For the past couple of years, Honey has been working with the U.S. organizing committee of the 2013 America's Cup as its technical director, and has helped develop a tracking system, in much the same way he has done for fans watching football, baseball and hockey.
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