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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Central Intelligence Agency acknowledged for the first time publicly yesterday that an American Catholic priest may have been murdered in 1983 by the Honduran military, which was strongly backed at the time by the United States.One possibility acknowledged by the CIA yesterday was that the Rev. James Carney may have been thrown from a flying helicopter.The agency declassified 36 documents yesterday involving the disappearance of Carney, a Jesuit who after years of ministering to Honduras' poor joined the leftist insurgents.
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NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Caitlin Francke contributed to this article | October 24, 1998
The Central Intelligence Agency knew that the Honduran military committed repeated and systematic human rights abuses in the 1980s but continued to collaborate with its Honduran partners and misled Congress about the abuses, the agency has acknowledged in declassified documents."
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NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 24, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- Every weekday morning a heavily-armed convoy of three trucks moves through the narrow streets of this city from the suburban home of Judge Roy Medina to the criminal courthouse where he investigates the corrupt and brutal past of his country.The most controversial of the trials is one in which 10 Honduran military officers have been accused of kidnapping and torturing six university students during the 1980s. The officers are all suspected of being former members of a CIA-trained unit known as Battalion 316 that kidnapped, tortured and murdered suspected leftists in the 1980s.
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Leo Valladares, a Honduran human rights investigator, said yesterday that a Honduran military commander, Gen. Luis Discua, told him in late 1993 that at the request of the CIA he created a Honduran military unit found to have kidnapped, tortured and murdered suspected subversives in the 1980s.At a meeting at the presidential palace in Tegucigalpa, Valladares said, Discua "held up a file [and] said: 'If I created Battalion 316, it's because I was asked to do so by the CIA.' "Valladares was testifying before a congressional committee on legislation that would speed the declassification of material requested by Latin American and Caribbean "truth commissions" that seek to uncover Cold War misdeeds by military leaders.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Caitlin Francke contributed to this article | October 24, 1998
The Central Intelligence Agency knew that the Honduran military committed repeated and systematic human rights abuses in the 1980s but continued to collaborate with its Honduran partners and misled Congress about the abuses, the agency has acknowledged in declassified documents."
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Leo Valladares, a Honduran human rights investigator, said yesterday that a Honduran military commander, Gen. Luis Discua, told him in late 1993 that at the request of the CIA he created a Honduran military unit found to have kidnapped, tortured and murdered suspected subversives in the 1980s.At a meeting at the presidential palace in Tegucigalpa, Valladares said, Discua "held up a file [and] said: 'If I created Battalion 316, it's because I was asked to do so by the CIA.' "Valladares was testifying before a congressional committee on legislation that would speed the declassification of material requested by Latin American and Caribbean "truth commissions" that seek to uncover Cold War misdeeds by military leaders.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- CIA Director John M. Deutch said yesterday that the current review of abuses committed by a CIA-trained Honduran military battalion would provide lessons for the agency on "how not to do things" in the future.Responding to a question after a speech to the National Press Club, Mr. Deutch predicted that the internal probe would yield "new information" but did not say whether it had uncovered wrongdoing by Central Intelligence Agency officials.Mr. Deutch ordered the agency in mid-June to review the history of its relationship with the Honduran military during the 1980s.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Karen Hosler and Mark Matthews and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- John M. Deutch, the director of central intelligence, has ordered the CIA to review the history of its relationship with the Honduran military during the 1980s, a spokesman said yesterday.Mr. Deutch's order was issued last week, after the publication of a series in The Sun that detailed how the CIA equipped and helped train a Honduran military battalion that engaged in torture and execution of Honduran citizens.An agency inspector general investigated the CIA-Honduran relationship in 1988 and found no wrongdoing by CIA officials, according to agency spokesman Mark Mansfield.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 19, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- Three Honduran military officers accused of human rights abuses eluded authorities trying to serve arrest warrants on them yesterday.The officers are suspected of being former members of a CIA-trained unit called Battalion 316 that launched a violent campaign against suspected leftists as part of the Reagan administration's efforts to wipe out communism in Central America in the 1980s.Their arrest was ordered on Tuesday by Judge Roy Medina, of the first Criminal Court of Letters, after attempts to make them come in voluntarily failed.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Gary Cohn and Ginger Thompson and Gary Cohn,Sun Staff Writers | July 12, 1995
Canada has ordered the expulsion of Fausto Reyes, a former member of a CIA-trained Honduran military unit that kidnapped, tortured and murdered hundreds of people during the 1980s.Three other former members of the Honduran squad also are in danger of deportation, Canadian officials said. Their residence there was arranged with the help of human rights groups with which they cooperated in exposing the activities of the squad, known as Battalion 316.Human rights advocates and prosecutors in Honduras expressed the hope that the four men would not be returned to Honduras because they are considered valuable witnesses and might be killed.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Honduran President Carlos Roberto Reina accused the United States yesterday of delaying the release of promised evidence that would help his country find out what happened to scores of suspected leftists believed to have been murdered by a CIA-trained Honduran military unit during the 1980s."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Central Intelligence Agency acknowledged for the first time publicly yesterday that an American Catholic priest may have been murdered in 1983 by the Honduran military, which was strongly backed at the time by the United States.One possibility acknowledged by the CIA yesterday was that the Rev. James Carney may have been thrown from a flying helicopter.The agency declassified 36 documents yesterday involving the disappearance of Carney, a Jesuit who after years of ministering to Honduras' poor joined the leftist insurgents.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 12, 1997
President Clinton promised Congress last week that the administration is close to releasing classified information to Honduran authorities about human rights abuses by the Honduran military in the 1980s.Clinton was responding to declassification petitions from members of Congress and the Honduran government. They want the information to help Honduras prosecute the members of a CIA-trained Honduran military unit that kidnapped, tortured and murdered suspected leftists at the height of the U.S.-led war against communism in Central America in the 1980s.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and GARY COHN and JAMES BOCK and GARY COHN,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ginger Thompson contributed to this article | December 1, 1995
A suspected former leader of a CIA-trained Honduran army unit that tortured and killed civilians will be charged today with the 1982 murder of a government lawyer, a Honduran prosecutor said yesterday.The indictment of Col. Alexander Hernandez would be the first murder charge brought against a high-ranking military officer in the 1980s wave of human rights abuses that took place as Battalion 316 waged a clandestine campaign against suspected leftists.Colonel Hernandez is to be charged in the killing of Nelson Mackay Chavarria, whose disappearance was detailed in June in a four-part series in The Sun.In another significant development, the chief of the Honduran armed forces testified behind closed doors yesterday before a judge investigating another Battalion 316 case -- the 1982 kidnapping and torture of six university students.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 24, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- Every weekday morning a heavily-armed convoy of three trucks moves through the narrow streets of this city from the suburban home of Judge Roy Medina to the criminal courthouse where he investigates the corrupt and brutal past of his country.The most controversial of the trials is one in which 10 Honduran military officers have been accused of kidnapping and torturing six university students during the 1980s. The officers are all suspected of being former members of a CIA-trained unit known as Battalion 316 that kidnapped, tortured and murdered suspected leftists in the 1980s.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 19, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- Three Honduran military officers accused of human rights abuses eluded authorities trying to serve arrest warrants on them yesterday.The officers are suspected of being former members of a CIA-trained unit called Battalion 316 that launched a violent campaign against suspected leftists as part of the Reagan administration's efforts to wipe out communism in Central America in the 1980s.Their arrest was ordered on Tuesday by Judge Roy Medina, of the first Criminal Court of Letters, after attempts to make them come in voluntarily failed.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writers Gary Cohn and Ginger Thompson contributed to this article. DL WASHINGTON | June 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The House Select Intelligence Committee, responding to a recent series of articles in The Sun, will get a briefing from the Central Intelligence Agency tomorrow on alleged human rights abuses by a CIA-trained Honduran military battalion during the 1980s."
NEWS
By GINGER THOMPSON AND GARY COHN and GINGER THOMPSON AND GARY COHN,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Sun staff writer Mark Matthews contributed to this article | October 11, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- Ten Honduran military officers will defy a court summons to answer questions about their roles in human rights abuses a dozen years ago when a secret army unit trained by the CIA was kidnapping, torturing and murdering suspected subversives, the officers' attorney said yesterday.The move here came as the Clinton administration said it would speed up the declassification of documents pertaining to the period when the CIA is suspected of collaborating with the unit known as Battalion 316.The 10 former and present military officers refusing to appear in court here have been specifically accused of kidnapping and torturing six university students in 1982.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | September 22, 1995
The Senate is urging President Clinton to "expeditiously" declassify government documents about the torture and murder of Honduran citizens by a CIA-trained Honduran military unit during the 1980s.The call came in an amendment sponsored by three Democrats, saying the president should "order the expedited declassification of any documents in the possession of the United States government," pertaining to kidnappings and murders, or so-called "disappearances" at the hands of the military unit, known as Battalion 316, and make those documents available to Honduran authorities investigating the abuses.
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