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NEWS
June 15, 1995
The State Department can't wash its hands of the stain left by the Honduran death squad scandal. It's no surprise that the CIA is stonewalling in response to questions about the role of some of its officers in the kidnapping, torture and murder of Hondurans during the early '80s. That's still standard practice at the intelligence agency, even under new leadership. But for the State Department to shield -- and express continued confidence in -- an ambassador still on active service who connived at these atrocities is unacceptable.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
A cocaine trafficking ring that for years distributed "vast amounts" of Honduran cocaine throughout the mid-Atlantic region has been busted, and three Maryland residents and 25 Virginia residents involved have been arrested, according to federal prosecutors. The drug ring, based in Northern Virginia, routinely paid couriers to fly into the United States from Honduras with cocaine stashed in shoes, decorative wooden frames and other "innocuous items" that would blend in with their luggage, according to a statement on the bust released Thursday by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Virginia.
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NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Gary Cohn and Ginger Thompson and Gary Cohn,Sun Staff Correspondents | July 28, 1995
A Honduran judge yesterday ordered 11 current and former military officials not to leave the country while he considers charges against them of kidnapping and torturing student activists during the 1980s.The order came as the commander of the Honduran military expressed his full confidence in the accused men and promised the military's full support for them.Yesterday's order by Judge Roy Medina is the latest step in the process of investigating and prosecuting military officers responsible for the torture and murder of hundreds of people in Honduras during the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
An MS-13 gang member wanted in Honduras in the killing of a man with a machete was arrested Monday at his home in Randallstown, federal authorities announced. Oscar Orlando Amador Centeno, 29, had previously been deported in January 2010 for illegally entering the country, and officials say that in July 2010 he struck a man three times with a machete on a soccer field in Olancho, Honduras, and stole his wallet. Amador Centeno re-entered the country at an unknown time and began living in Randallstown.
NEWS
November 23, 2000
Baltimore's Hispanic community is trying to collect $4,300 this weekend to fly the body of Honduran immigrant Juan Angel Murrillo home for a funeral Monday. The 40-year-old father of six was fatally shot Sunday in the 2100 block of Barclay St. during an attempted robbery, police said. Murrillo had been in the United States for a month and was working at odd jobs so he could send money to his family in Honduras, said Enrique Rivadeneira, owner of the Latin Palace night club and president of the Hispanic Business Association.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Gary Cohn and Ginger Thompson and Gary Cohn,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 1995
A Honduran judge yesterday declared there is enough evidence to prosecute four military officers accused of kidnapping and torturing six university students in the 1980s.Judge Roy Medina issued arrest warrants for three of the four, who are fugitives from earlier warrants for questioning in the case. The fourth is in prison on unrelated drug trafficking charges.One of those named in yesterday's action by the judge is Col. Alexander Hernandez. He is suspected of being the former commander of a CIA-trained military unit known as Battalion 316, whose members abducted, tortured and murdered suspected leftists in the 1980s.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Gary Cohn and Ginger Thompson and Gary Cohn,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 7, 1995
Honduran President Carlos Roberto Reina, who ran for office as a champion of human rights, said yesterday that he favors amnesty for military officers suspected of kidnapping, torturing and killing Honduran citizens during the 1980s.Interviewed by reporters after opening a water treatment system in a slum outside the capital, Tegucigalpa, Mr. Reina was asked yesterday whether he believed a 1991 amnesty for political crimes committed during the 1980s covers military officials responsible for abuses.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Concern over crime against Latinos, already simmering in Baltimore as a result of several attacks in recent weeks, has reached new heights after the fatal beating over the weekend of a 51-year-old man from Honduras. Martin Reyes — whose killing early Saturday was attributed by police to a mentally troubled man who said he hated "Mexicans" — was the fifth Latino shooting or homicide victim in the area in less than two months, officials said. All the victims were Honduran, according to residents, and one was Reyes' nephew, Juan de Dios Hernandez, 27, who was shot in the forehead July 24. "We're afraid that they're trying to finish off the Hispanics," said Anibal Rodriguez, 30, a Honduran laborer who moved to Baltimore five years ago and who was sitting Monday morning on steps of a house across Kenwood Avenue from where Reyes died.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
Wide-eyed and silent under the sweltering Honduran sun, children waited with their parents in a line that stretched for blocks across the town of Santa Barbara, watching and listening as the doctors, most of them from Maryland, unpacked their supplies in front of the hospital. "You never see these kids or babies crying here. They will wait for hours to see us," said Dr. Howard Hauptman, a rheumatologist in Nottingham. "I couldn't imagine going to an American pediatrician's office and seeing that."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As part of its investigation into military officers accused of murdering civilians during the 1980s, Honduras asked the State Department and Central Intelligence Agency yesterday to release records about their involvement in the military's activities, especially those of a secret intelligence unit.The Honduran attorney general's office submitted the request to the U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, asking for detailed information about U.S. ties with Gen. Gustavo Alvarez Martinez, who, as former chief of the Honduran armed forces, directed the secret intelligence group responsible for the kidnapping, torture and murder hundreds of alleged subversives.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Concern over crime against Latinos, already simmering in Baltimore as a result of several attacks in recent weeks, has reached new heights after the fatal beating over the weekend of a 51-year-old man from Honduras. Martin Reyes — whose killing early Saturday was attributed by police to a mentally troubled man who said he hated "Mexicans" — was the fifth Latino shooting or homicide victim in the area in less than two months, officials said. All the victims were Honduran, according to residents, and one was Reyes' nephew, Juan de Dios Hernandez, 27, who was shot in the forehead July 24. "We're afraid that they're trying to finish off the Hispanics," said Anibal Rodriguez, 30, a Honduran laborer who moved to Baltimore five years ago and who was sitting Monday morning on steps of a house across Kenwood Avenue from where Reyes died.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Andrea F. Siegel and Liz F. Kay and Andrea F. Siegel,Liz.kay@baltsun.com and Andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | February 5, 2010
Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials detained seven people from Honduras after a raid Thursday in Anne Arundel County, prompting a demonstration outside the Baltimore Federal Building. ICE spokeswoman Ernestine Fobbs confirmed that an enforcement action took place and that seven Hondurans were in custody. She said that because the investigation is continuing, she could provide only limited information. Fobbs did not disclose the name of the business where the Hondurans were working or the location of the business.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Andrea F. Siegel and Baltimore Sun reporters | February 5, 2010
Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials detained seven people from Honduras after a raid Thursday in Anne Arundel County, prompting a demonstration outside the Baltimore Federal Building. ICE spokeswoman Ernestine Fobbs confirmed that an enforcement action took place and that seven Hondurans were in custody. She said that because the investigation is continuing, she could provide only limited information. Fobbs did not disclose the name of the business where the Hondurans were working or the location of the business.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
A 29-year-old Honduran immigrant, who told Howard County authorities that he took part in a fatal stabbing last year in Columbia only because an acquaintance threatened to kill him if he refused, pleaded guilty yesterday to second-degree murder and was sentenced to 13 years in prison. Jerman Avelar's contention - that he stabbed 40-year-old Rigoberto Zavala on orders from a man who admitted killing at least six other people in their native Honduras - was the driving force behind yesterday's plea deal, which limited Avelar's exposure to prison time, while still assuring a murder conviction, Howard prosecutors said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 9, 2004
A 29-year-old Honduran immigrant, who told Howard County authorities that he took part in a fatal stabbing last year in Columbia only because an acquaintance threatened to kill him if he refused, pleaded guilty yesterday to second-degree murder and was sentenced to 13 years in prison. Jerman Avelar's contention - that he stabbed 40-year-old Rigoberto Zavala on orders from a man who admitted killing at least six other people in their native Honduras - was the driving force behind yesterday's plea deal, which limited Avelar's prison time while still assuring a murder conviction, Howard prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
Before a Baltimore County police officer shot and killed a 22-year-old Honduran immigrant, department officials were planning to offer more classes to officers who want to learn Spanish phrases such as "Stop!" and "Drop the gun!" Some neighbors, friends and Latino community activists feel that if the officers in Essex had spoken Spanish, the death of Francisco Perez may have been avoided. But activists also said this week that they welcome any training that could help diffuse confrontations between non-English-speaking residents and police officers.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Caitlin Francke and Gary Cohn and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1997
The Central Intelligence Agency released yesterday more than 200 pages of heavily censored, previously classified material about its collaboration with a Honduran military unit that kidnapped, tortured and murdered suspected leftists during the 1980s -- but the documents were denounced as meaningless by Honduras' human rights investigator."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Sara Neufeld and Laura Barnhardt and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2003
Neighbors said yesterday that the 22-year-old Honduran immigrant shot and killed by a Baltimore County police officer early Sunday in Essex did not speak any English and could not have understood that officers wanted him to drop a knife he was holding. But Baltimore County police said that two witnesses told them that the man, identified as Franciso Antonio Perez, spoke enough English to understand their commands. "Language was not an issue," said Bill Toohey, a police spokesman. "When three officers are shouting at you with their guns drawn, it'd be prudent to drop the weapon."
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