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By ROB KASPER | November 24, 1991
I did something daring recently: I went shopping at a strange grocery store.I realize buying groceries in an unfamiliar setting is not as exciting as skinny-dipping in the Caribbean. But these days you take your thrills where you find them.So it was that I found myself tracking down -- and yes! eventually finding -- cans of hominy in some distant canned corn aisle. But I'm jumping ahead of myself in this spine-tingling tale.The most challenging part of my adventure came right at the beginning -- finding the store.
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By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | November 19, 2008
My family likes this casserole because its texture and flavors sidle up nicely to roast turkey. It also is terrific as a leftover, a crucial asset of any Thanksgiving dish. The hominy in it reminds me of the Native Americans who helped the Pilgrims get the first feast up and running. Like most family recipes, this one has its stories of struggle. Hominy, we discovered some years ago, can be hard to find in Boston groceries. So when we traveled to Massachusetts to enjoy Thanksgiving dinner with relatives, we carried cans of hominy with us from Baltimore.
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FEATURES
By Andrew Silva and Andrew Silva,Eating Well Magazine | February 8, 1995
A canned good that sits on grocery shelves with neighbors like okra, black-eyed peas and collards, hominy sometimes collects a little dust.But open a can, and discover the swollen, sweet kernels of prepared corn."
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS? and ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS?,NEWSDAY | May 17, 2006
Polenta and grits are both made by cooking dried, ground corn with water to achieve a porridge. The difference between them lies in how the corn is processed and ground. Corn is a grain native to the Americas, and it didn't arrive in Europe until Columbus brought it back upon his return to Spain. Europeans came to appreciate field corn, a starchier variety that is ground into cornmeal and used as animal feed. Northern Italians took to it and used the meal in the grain porridge called polenta that had been eaten since Roman times.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 11, 1994
The hominy cans usually sit on the grocery store shelf somewhere between the beans and shoe peg corn.But ask what hominy is and most cooks won't know.Yet to pearl hominy devotees, Baltimore is the source. The city's surviving vegetable packing house cans one product -- the pearl hominy that sets the standard for the Middle Atlantic region.Pearl hominy is dried whole white corn kernels which have been cooked in water for long hours until they soften and form a pudding-like consistency. Its fans savor the dish for breakfast or as a dinner vegetable.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez | February 16, 1992
BALTIMORE USED TO BE THE KIND of town where gin mills had free bowls of steamed crabs on the bar to keep up their patrons' thirst for beer.The deep-water port on the Patapsco was once a city where seamen just in from South America walked off of ships carrying parrots and monkeys to give away to friends and family as pets.And some 88 years ago, Baltimore was the kind of place where Mike Manning's grandmother could start a food-canning business in the back yard of her Canton row house at 2425 Foster Ave."
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS? and ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS?,NEWSDAY | May 17, 2006
Polenta and grits are both made by cooking dried, ground corn with water to achieve a porridge. The difference between them lies in how the corn is processed and ground. Corn is a grain native to the Americas, and it didn't arrive in Europe until Columbus brought it back upon his return to Spain. Europeans came to appreciate field corn, a starchier variety that is ground into cornmeal and used as animal feed. Northern Italians took to it and used the meal in the grain porridge called polenta that had been eaten since Roman times.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 18, 1996
As Presidents Day approached, I found myself wondering: What did George and Abe like to eat?George and Abe were George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, our first and 16th presidents, who, in addition to being responsible for this three-day weekend, also get credit for founding and preserving the United States of America.Historians have dealt with the minds and motives of these men. I was interested in their palates. I wanted to know what they ate for breakfast, lunch and state occasions. I called researchers familiar with the lives and dietary habits of these men.I learned that Washington was a fan of hoecakes, hominy and home-brewed beer.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | March 31, 1991
Grits -- they're not just for breakfast anymore.DOr, to be more specific, they're not just for the kinds of breakfast enjoyed by good ol' boys called Bubba who drive around in pickups with gun racks in their rear windows and coon dogs named Blue in back.As the previous paragraph attests, those not born in the heart of the Southland can be snooty about grits.Many Northern types share the views expressed by a former Miss America, who was rash enough (and on a visit to Georgia, yet!) to sniff "What are grits?
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 1997
TEN RESIDENTS of northwest Carroll set out for Watertown, S.D., in mid-October to help repair damage from last spring's floods.Though the destruction was not as extensive as it was in areas of neighboring North Dakota, the need was very real. The effort proved to be rewarding for the people doing the work as it was for the mostly elderly recipients."One of the neatest parts of the trip was how people shared their stories with us," said Michelle Skiles, who coordinated the trip with her husband, Keir.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 1997
TEN RESIDENTS of northwest Carroll set out for Watertown, S.D., in mid-October to help repair damage from last spring's floods.Though the destruction was not as extensive as it was in areas of neighboring North Dakota, the need was very real. The effort proved to be rewarding for the people doing the work as it was for the mostly elderly recipients."One of the neatest parts of the trip was how people shared their stories with us," said Michelle Skiles, who coordinated the trip with her husband, Keir.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 18, 1996
As Presidents Day approached, I found myself wondering: What did George and Abe like to eat?George and Abe were George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, our first and 16th presidents, who, in addition to being responsible for this three-day weekend, also get credit for founding and preserving the United States of America.Historians have dealt with the minds and motives of these men. I was interested in their palates. I wanted to know what they ate for breakfast, lunch and state occasions. I called researchers familiar with the lives and dietary habits of these men.I learned that Washington was a fan of hoecakes, hominy and home-brewed beer.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 19, 1995
Thanksgiving is the best holiday of the year. Here are 10 reasons why.First, it is the right length -- a three-day celebration. I count the three days of the holiday as Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Sunday and Wednesday, the days devoted to holiday travel, are bummers, so I toss them out.The big problem with other holidays is that they last too long. For example, we may start off the Christmas season all cheery and bright, but after weeks of shopping, we begin considering tying folks to the Christmas tree and having a big bonfire.
FEATURES
By Andrew Silva and Andrew Silva,Eating Well Magazine | February 8, 1995
A canned good that sits on grocery shelves with neighbors like okra, black-eyed peas and collards, hominy sometimes collects a little dust.But open a can, and discover the swollen, sweet kernels of prepared corn."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 11, 1994
The hominy cans usually sit on the grocery store shelf somewhere between the beans and shoe peg corn.But ask what hominy is and most cooks won't know.Yet to pearl hominy devotees, Baltimore is the source. The city's surviving vegetable packing house cans one product -- the pearl hominy that sets the standard for the Middle Atlantic region.Pearl hominy is dried whole white corn kernels which have been cooked in water for long hours until they soften and form a pudding-like consistency. Its fans savor the dish for breakfast or as a dinner vegetable.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez | February 16, 1992
BALTIMORE USED TO BE THE KIND of town where gin mills had free bowls of steamed crabs on the bar to keep up their patrons' thirst for beer.The deep-water port on the Patapsco was once a city where seamen just in from South America walked off of ships carrying parrots and monkeys to give away to friends and family as pets.And some 88 years ago, Baltimore was the kind of place where Mike Manning's grandmother could start a food-canning business in the back yard of her Canton row house at 2425 Foster Ave."
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 19, 1995
Thanksgiving is the best holiday of the year. Here are 10 reasons why.First, it is the right length -- a three-day celebration. I count the three days of the holiday as Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Sunday and Wednesday, the days devoted to holiday travel, are bummers, so I toss them out.The big problem with other holidays is that they last too long. For example, we may start off the Christmas season all cheery and bright, but after weeks of shopping, we begin considering tying folks to the Christmas tree and having a big bonfire.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | November 19, 2008
My family likes this casserole because its texture and flavors sidle up nicely to roast turkey. It also is terrific as a leftover, a crucial asset of any Thanksgiving dish. The hominy in it reminds me of the Native Americans who helped the Pilgrims get the first feast up and running. Like most family recipes, this one has its stories of struggle. Hominy, we discovered some years ago, can be hard to find in Boston groceries. So when we traveled to Massachusetts to enjoy Thanksgiving dinner with relatives, we carried cans of hominy with us from Baltimore.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 24, 1991
I did something daring recently: I went shopping at a strange grocery store.I realize buying groceries in an unfamiliar setting is not as exciting as skinny-dipping in the Caribbean. But these days you take your thrills where you find them.So it was that I found myself tracking down -- and yes! eventually finding -- cans of hominy in some distant canned corn aisle. But I'm jumping ahead of myself in this spine-tingling tale.The most challenging part of my adventure came right at the beginning -- finding the store.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | March 31, 1991
Grits -- they're not just for breakfast anymore.DOr, to be more specific, they're not just for the kinds of breakfast enjoyed by good ol' boys called Bubba who drive around in pickups with gun racks in their rear windows and coon dogs named Blue in back.As the previous paragraph attests, those not born in the heart of the Southland can be snooty about grits.Many Northern types share the views expressed by a former Miss America, who was rash enough (and on a visit to Georgia, yet!) to sniff "What are grits?
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