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Homicide Unit

NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2010
In August 2008, a group of friends were walking through the Inner Harbor early in the morning when they heard a scream and a splash. When they turned around, 22-year-old Ankush Gupta was gone. No one saw what happened, nor could the harbor's network of security cameras provide an account. With no evidence of trauma to the body, the only conclusive information investigators had about the Montgomery County man's death was that he had drowned. On Tuesday, city homicide detectives arrested a 20-year-old Curtis Bay man who confessed to pushing Gupta into the water.
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NEWS
August 14, 2014
City police officials have replaced the department's homicide chief in the wake of a string of unsolved murders this summer that shattered what had been a period of relative calm. Maj. Stanley Brandford will take over the homicide unit from Maj. Dennis Smith, who had been running homicide along with the shooting and robbery divisions since April. Putting the unit under separate command is probably the right move given the outsized role homicides play in shaping perceptions of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1998
Their silence was atypical.So, Mary K. Edmondson went to the Reservoir Hill home to seek out the daughter and granddaughter she had not heard from for days. She climbed the brick rowhouse's steps to their apartment and used the landlord's key to let herself in.She found what she dreaded she might: her daughter and grandchild bound and stabbed to death.They were the second pair of women slain in the neighborhood in five weeks this summer, leaving residents -- especially women -- wary.Some consider the four killings an unfortunate fluke, but others wonder if the deaths are a sign that the battle their community is waging against violent crime is being lost.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
An 18-year-old man who was shot last month in East Baltimore died on Friday, police said. Gregory Anthony Ware Jr., whose last known address was in the 1000 block of N. Kenwood Ave., was shot in the head at about 8:32 p.m. on Feb. 10 in the 2800 block of E. Eager St. in the Madison-East End neighborhood. He was taken to an area hospital for treatment, and died from his injuries just after 9 p.m. Friday. No suspect or motive have been identified in the shooting, which has been upgraded to a homicide.
NEWS
By David Simon | April 28, 1991
Not more than 24 hours after suspects in two separate drug slayings were arrested by Baltimore homicide detectives this month, they were returned to the street -- released on bail by District Court judges.Within days:* Witnesses and potential witnesses in the two cases became uncooperative, with some backing away from prior statements and others demanding police protection in a city that has little or no money to spend to ensure the safety of witnesses, police said.* One defendant apparently managed to remove as many as four semiautomatic weapons from his and his girlfriend's town house before detectives could obtain and execute a search warrant.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1999
The Baltimore Police Department is poised to shake up its homicide unit for the first time in 50 years and assign detectives to geographic beats, hoping to reduce the murder toll in the nation's fourth-deadliest city.Under the plan, which significantly alters the way the homicide unit has worked since it was formed after World War II, detectives will answer to a new commander who will also oversee nonfatal shooting investigations and a task force that targets youth violence.The changes are part of a departmentwide overhaul that makes district lieutenants responsible for groups of neighborhoods on a 24-hour basis, turning the lieutenants into mini-chiefs with discretion over officer deployment and money.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
At first, Baltimore police couldn't make sense of the savage beating deaths of three homeless men in South Baltimore this spring. They couldn't tell if anything had been stolen. They found no eyewitnesses. And the homeless community didn't trust the detectives. Detectives said yesterday that they unraveled the case by shedding their suits and putting on T-shirts and jeans and going to homeless encampments day after day, asking questions. They donated 70 bags of the homicide unit's clothing to homeless men. They brought bag lunches and then got Esskay Quality Meats to donate 75 pounds of hot dogs for a cookout and Utz Quality Foods to provide hundreds of bags of potato chips.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
His family feared the worst after Marcus "Anton" Lesane went missing two weeks ago, and on Wednesday those concerns were confirmed when his body was found stashed behind a vacant home in Northwest Baltimore. Police confirmed that a body found Tuesday morning in the 2600 block of Loyola Southway was that of Lesane, a 27-year-old who had been living in Southwest Baltimore and was last seen April 10 with a friend. He had been shot. A resident who regularly sweeps the alley found his body in the rear of a crumbling vacant home, according to police and residents.
NEWS
By David Simon | October 30, 1991
Daniel W. Shea, a veteran detective who spent his last eight years solving murders and other crimes for the Baltimore Police Department's homicide unit, died Saturday at home after a five-month battle with lung cancer. He was 42.Well-read, thoughtful and possessed of an exceptionally dry wit, Danny Shea was as unlikely a candidate for a police career as could be found. A careful student of history and literature, he was as comfortable discussing English poets and Irish rebellions as he was talking about bullet calibers and wound tracks.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
Retired from the Baltimore Police Department's storied homicide unit, Jay C. Landsman Sr. is enjoying phase two of his law enforcement career as a corporal in the Baltimore County police force. He is quick with a smile, still a prince of the wisecrack. Jay C. Landsman Jr. is a second-generation homicide detective, and he is also a corporal in the county Police Department. He is a no-nonsense law enforcement professional, with a military-style haircut and ramrod-straight carriage. The elder Landsman says he is proud that he inspired the Richard Belzer character, sarcastic joker Detective John Munch, on television's Homicide: Life on the Street.
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