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By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 1998
Three tell-tale signs that it's spring in Baltimore: The birds come back to town -- both the little chirping kind that hang out in the trees and the kind that hang out at Camden Yards.Daffodils and tulips push their way up to the earth's surface, unfold in a glorious pageant of color -- then freeze and die from a late, freak cold snap.And the Johns Hopkins University holds its annual spring fair.For 27 years, Hopkins has opened up its Homewood campus to the people of Baltimore, offering three days of fun and entertainment, and almost all of it for free.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Johns Hopkins University now has its own official ice cream flavor, Blue Jay Batter. The blueberry cheesecake-flavored ice cream, which was developed for the university in collaboration with Dominion Ice Cream, is debuting at 2 p.m. today at a special event on the upper quad of Hopkins' Homewood Campus. Students, faculty and staff will be treated to free ice cream samples and Blue Jay Batter T-shirts. After the debut, Blue Jay Batter will be available just across the main campus at Dominion Ice Cream , which is best known for its vegetable ice cream flavor like sweet potato, spinach, carrot, sweet corn and beet.  Donna Calloway, the owner of Dominion Ice cream, mixed batch after batch until the new flavor acquired its nice bluejay-like shade, according to a Hopkins spokewoman.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2004
The Johns Hopkins University has hired a national consulting firm to assess security measures at its Homewood campus, school officials announced yesterday. Discussions with iXP Corporation, of Princeton, N.J., were under way before the killing of Hopkins junior Christopher Elser, who died April 18 after being stabbed the day before by an intruder at an off-campus apartment building on St. Paul Street, said campus spokesman Dennis O'Shea. No arrest has been made in the killing of Elser, 20, of Camden, S.C. "This has been in the works for some period of time," O'Shea said of the security consulting contract.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 10, 2013
Johns Hopkins University sophomore Ely Manstein wasn't sure what to make of the flier that Charlotte Zarzar handed him as he was walking along North Charles Street between classes Sept. 3. Manstein, a biophysics major from Philadelphia, studied the card-shaped flier from the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, which is trying to raise public awareness of pedestrian and bicyclist safety as part of its annual Street Smart campaign. In bold letters and numbers, the card told a cautionary story of 32 pedestrians killed and 2,187 injured in traffic accidents in Baltimore from 2009 to 2011, according to three-year crash data by the city Department of Transportation and the Maryland Highway Safety Office.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 10, 2013
Johns Hopkins University sophomore Ely Manstein wasn't sure what to make of the flier that Charlotte Zarzar handed him as he was walking along North Charles Street between classes Sept. 3. Manstein, a biophysics major from Philadelphia, studied the card-shaped flier from the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, which is trying to raise public awareness of pedestrian and bicyclist safety as part of its annual Street Smart campaign. In bold letters and numbers, the card told a cautionary story of 32 pedestrians killed and 2,187 injured in traffic accidents in Baltimore from 2009 to 2011, according to three-year crash data by the city Department of Transportation and the Maryland Highway Safety Office.
NEWS
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2004
Visitors are welcomed by an inscription that reads: "Let your house be wide open." The maxim in the lobby of the new Hillel building on the Johns Hopkins University campus is more than a cheery salutation. It is an affirmation of the building's purpose. "A good Hillel is one that reflects the Jewish values of being welcoming," said Rabbi Joseph Menashe, the director of Hillel at Hopkins. The recently completed Smokler Center for Jewish Life, Harry and Jeanette Weinberg building, will have its grand opening at 10 a.m. tomorrow, although students have been using it for several weeks.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2011
The poor bird was a goner. That's what everyone thought that November day when the big red-tailed hawk slammed into a window at the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. The impact shattered the quarter-inch-thick plate glass, and the roughly 4-pound bird plummeted some 25 feet, landing in a feathery heap. Not only did she survive, but, amazingly, broke no bones. She was badly bruised, though, and likely would have perished without a few strokes of good luck, such as Hopkins employing a carpenter who happens to be a raptor aficionado.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
FIRST, LOYOLA College in Maryland broke ground for a Tudoresque business school. Then, the University of Maryland, Baltimore began constructing a law school with Gothic overtones.Now, the Johns Hopkins University has weighed in with another building in a period style -- a neo-Georgian structure that will house its Institute for Biomedical Engineering.Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel recently approved preliminary plans for a four-story, 60,000-square-foot building called Clark Hall to be constructed on the west side of the Homewood campus by mid-2001.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
Don't look for traditional bus stop signs marking one of Baltimore's busiest transit conveyances, a bumpy jitney called the Shuttle by those who live and learn by its frequent goings and comings.These traditional 40- to 44-passenger school buses -- which melt into a yellow blur in city traffic -- are a conduit provided by the Johns Hopkins University to its various outposts in North and East Baltimore and Mount Vernon. There is no parallel MTA service that duplicates the Hopkins Shuttle.Starting at 6: 30 a.m. weekdays, the first of a day's 96 bus runs begins on an asphalt apron directly behind the Baltimore Museum of Art.By the time the bus reaches its first off-campus stop, St. Paul and 27th streets in Charles Village, it is half-filled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | August 29, 1999
When students return to the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus next month, they'll be attending a university that just cracked U.S. News and World Report's prestigious annual Top 10 list.While Homewood's rise in the rankings (from 14th to a tie for seventh) might be cause for celebration, students are more likely to benefit directly from the university's improved physical environment.A new interfaith center just opened near University Parkway. Shops and restaurants are filling the base of the Homewood apartments at Charles and 31st streets.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
The last time Johns Hopkins freshman Gracie Golden rode in a shopping cart before Saturday was during her toddler years in a grocery store - and those carts weren't covered in duct tape or pushed at breakneck speed while she held on for dear life. Golden, a member of student radio station WJHU, joined her colleagues and other groups of students in Saturday's Red Bull Chariot Races, an uncanny but festive collegiate event that the energy drink maker holds on campuses nationwide each year.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
When Baltimore officials have talked about the city's "anchor institutions" - universities, hospitals, churches and other nonprofits - it has occasionally been unclear what sense of the word "anchor" they have sought to convey. When talk turns to what these tax-exempt entities contribute to keeping the city alive, the word has sometimes carried less an aura of stability and more a sense of great weight dragging things down. With today's announcement that it will invest $10 million over five years in its effort to organize the neighborhoods around the Homewood Campus around common development goals, the Johns Hopkins University is going a long way toward changing that.
NEWS
November 4, 2012
The University of Chicago's efforts to revitalize the neighborhood surrounding its campus suggests a similar opportunity is available for the Baltimore City neighborhood of Charles Village. As recently reported elsewhere, the University of Chicago has made a $250 million investment in the neighborhoods surrounding the Hyde Park campus. The plan includes the renovation of retail properties and the redevelopment of unused buildings into commercial spaces like a movie theater, shops and office space.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 29, 2011
Martha O. Roseman, a retired Johns Hopkins University associate dean of academic advising who was recalled as a "grandmother" of the Homewood campus, died of cancer July 22 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Pikesville resident was 90. Born Martha Ozrowitz in Brooklyn, N.Y., she earned a degree at the Bernard Baruch School of Business, a branch of the City College of New York. In an autobiographical sketch, she recalled taking additional courses at the school's 135th Street campus, which was not coed and where she said she was "surrounded by 5,000 male undergraduates.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2011
A 20-year-old bicyclist and Johns Hopkins University student who was struck by a vehicle Saturday is in a coma, his father said Sunday. Nathan Krasnopoler, a second-year engineering student, was in a coma at Johns Hopkins Hospital on Sunday, according to his father, Mitchell Krasnopoler. "He had no pulse in the ambulance, they told us, but they were able to revive him," Mitchell Krasnopoler said. Nathan Krasnopoler was taken to the hospital Saturday after he was struck by a vehicle at 11:50 a.m. near the Hopkins Homewood campus in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2011
The poor bird was a goner. That's what everyone thought that November day when the big red-tailed hawk slammed into a window at the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. The impact shattered the quarter-inch-thick plate glass, and the roughly 4-pound bird plummeted some 25 feet, landing in a feathery heap. Not only did she survive, but, amazingly, broke no bones. She was badly bruised, though, and likely would have perished without a few strokes of good luck, such as Hopkins employing a carpenter who happens to be a raptor aficionado.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1997
While end-of-summer vacationers were packing resort roads with traffic, students with unpacking on their minds contributed to a traffic jam of another sort yesterday -- at the Johns Hopkins University.It is a scene being played out at colleges across Maryland and the nation during the Labor Day weekend, as students, with an entourage of parents, siblings and friends, navigate streets and parking lots to haul boxes, suitcases and computer gear into dormitories.But the brains at Johns Hopkins had moving-in day down to a science, at least for the Class of 2001, as more than 900 freshmen who moved into dorms at the Homewood campus in Baltimore yesterday.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2004
A 20-year-old Johns Hopkins University student stabbed by an intruder at his fraternity's Charles Village apartment house after a party died yesterday evening, authorities said. Christopher Elser, a junior from Camden, S.C., had been on life support at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. His parents and other family members had come to Baltimore to be at his side, officials said. University officials, informed of his death, quickly announced plans for a campus memorial service. They said classes at the Homewood campus will be canceled between 10 a.m. and noon tomorrow for the service, which will start shortly after 10 a.m. and likely be held outdoors at a site to be determined.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
The creators of "The Social Network" used the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus to double for Harvard because of its similar Georgian-style brick and marble. They did such a superb job you must look sharp to spot Hopkins in the finished film. That is, unless you go to school there. Most of the Hopkins locations come right at you in the opening of the film. In the beginning sequence, Mark Zuckerberg's girlfriend breaks up with him in a Cambridge bar. He dashes back to Kirkland House, his dorm, where he creates a geek-sexist "hot or not" program called "Facemash" as revenge.
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