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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
North Charles Street motorists, bikers and walkers will notice that the scaffolding that has masked the elegant south portico of historic Homewood Museum since late last fall has been removed, revealing a dazzling and historically accurate restoration. And on a sun-splashed September afternoon on the Johns Hopkins University campus, Catherine Rogers Arthur, Homewood's director and curator, couldn't wait to show off the nearly completed work to a visitor. "We were able to save as much of the True Cross as possible," she said.
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FEATURES
By Scott Ponemone and For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
When Homewood was completed around 1808, the house was one of the most stylish examples of Federal domestic architecture in America. No wonder Charles Carroll Jr., its owner, wanted the most fashionable furniture to fill it. And Baltimore was just the place for producing some of the most elegant and sophisticated furniture in the fledgling United States. The resulting union was a perfect marriage of architecture and furnishings. That marriage is regularly on view at Homewood Museum, located on the Johns Hopkins University campus.
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NEWS
March 2, 1995
A Johns Hopkins University senior and a city planner have come up with an intriguing idea that would expand the commercial stretch in the 3100 block of St. Paul Street one block north. Such an enlargement would essentially create a new village center for students and nearby Charles Village residents.This idea has considerable merit. If a palatable detailed plan can be developed, enabling City Council legislation could be introduced within the next few months."We are trying to avoid outright rezoning," explains Chris Ryer, a city planner and Charles Village resident, who has been working on the concept with Peter M. Dolkart, a senior from Miami.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
Johns Hopkins has won all six meetings in its series with Villanova, which is resuming for the first time since 2002. The Blue Jays have outscored their opponents, 82-61, while going 5-2 at home, while Villanova has outscored its opponents, 69-67, in its 3-4 record on the road. The Wildcats (5-7) have won four of their last six games, but an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament seems unlikely. They do have the Big East tournament AQ as a means to NCAAs. Senior long-stick midfielder John LoCascio has recorded four goals and 12 assists this season and is ranked fifth in Division I in caused turnovers per game (2.3)
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | November 21, 2004
It began simply as a wedding present from father to son. But could Charles Carroll of Carrollton, signer of the Declaration of Independence, have ever envisioned that his gift of Homewood House to son Charles Jr. would keep giving? Today, Homewood House, built in 1801, is the property of Johns Hopkins University. It is open for tours, workshops, programs and its annual "Homewood by Candlelight" holiday event (this year it's from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Dec. 6). The house endures as one of the finest examples of Federal period residential architecture.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | March 1, 1991
Call it concern for the community, but also call it a mighty attractive marketing opportunity.Union Memorial Hospital is running a large ad in today's Sun and Evening Sun in the form of an open letter offering to help the staff, patients and community affected by the imminent closing of Homewood Hospital Center-South. Homewood, which had the largest loss of any hospital in the state in the last fiscal year, said earlier this week that it will shut down within three months, laying off more than 600 workers and leaving hundreds of patients without a hospital.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | December 15, 1991
The old-fashioned joys of a 19th century Christmas, Maryland style, can be experienced at Homewood through Dec. 23.The classically styled federal mansion, once the home of Charles Carroll Jr. and now owned by the Johns Hopkins University, will be filled with garlands and greenery, and holiday music will drift through its gracefully proportioned, antiques-filled rooms.The house was built by Carroll in the first years of the 1800s, on land given him as a wedding present by his father, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
Police were trying yesterday to find out why someone fired repeatedly on a car Tuesday night in Northeast Baltimore, killing a 26-year-old man and wounding his teen-age nephew and 5-year-old son.Homicide detectives said the light blue Honda Civic was riddled with dozens of bullets, with several windows shot out and holes found in the doors. The car was near the victim's house with its engine running and in gear.Richard Satterfield Jr. of the 2300 block of Homewood Ave. was shot several times in the head and body about 9: 45 p.m. and was pronounced dead on the scene, slumped over the front seat of the car.His nephew, Ricco Peterson, 15, wounded several times in the head, was in critical condition yesterday at Johns Hopkins Children's Center, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
May 3, 2005
More than 1,250 athletes are expected to begin competing today at the 35th annual Baltimore City Special Olympics. Events includes a variety of track-and-field activities. Opening ceremonies will begin at 10:30 a.m., and the events - which are free and open to the public - will be held today and Thursday at Homewood Field on the Johns Hopkins University campus.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | May 21, 1991
The state has given Union Memorial Hospital a six-month trial period to run a community psychiatric program taken over from financially troubled Homewood Hospital, a neighboring facility going out of business.If the experiment goes well, Union Memorial will be able to assume control of the 35-bed program permanently, according to John Colmers, executive director of the Health Services Cost Review Commission. His agency approved the temporary takeover earlier this month.Homewood lost nearly $3.7 million in 1990 due to changing patient needs and low occupancy rates, and is winding down its operations.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | April 12, 2014
Talk all you want about the new era of parity in college lacrosse, there's still nothing to compare with the rivalry that put the "old" in old-school. The 111th meeting between Maryland and Johns Hopkins drew a capacity-plus homecoming crowd to Homewood Field for a game that the No. 9 Blue Jays sorely needed to win to ensure that they would not be left out of the NCAA tournament for the second year in a row. The fifth-ranked Terps did not need it nearly as much, and the case could probably be made that their urgency deficit was evident until the final minutes of an 11-6 Hopkins victory on a simply glorious spring afternoon.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
The Thompson trio for the Albany men's lacrosse team got the highlights, but Johns Hopkins got the win. The No. 10 Blue Jays overwhelmed the No. 19 Great Danes in the first half before the Thompsons put on a scoring display in Johns Hopkins' 13-8 win before an announced 1,553 at Homewood Field on Friday night. With the victory, the Blue Jays improved to 11-2 in their series with Albany, but more importantly, they snapped a three-game losing streak to improve to 6-3 and regain much-needed confidence.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Homewood Field in Baltimore is one of the more tradition-rich sites for men's lacrosse, and more than one opponent challenging Johns Hopkins has felt slightly intimidated by the venue, the nine NCAA championship banners and the blue- and white-clad crowd. But after scoring a 10-9 decision against the Blue Jays at Homewood on April 5, 2013, Albany - which will pay another visit on Friday at 7 p.m. - has no qualms about entering enemy territory. “We have a lot of guys who played last year and are playing again this weekend, knowing that they can step onto that field and can play well and can compete with them,” said Great Danes coach Scott Marr, a former attackman at Johns Hopkins and former offensive coordinator at Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
You could make a plausible argument that '80s pop star Thomas Dolby has been blinded with science. Since he was a teen, Dolby, now 55, has looked for ways to blend technology with sound - whether that meant writing a quirky synthpop anthem that rose to No. 5 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart in 1982 ("She Blinded Me With Science") or inventing a cousin of the polyphonic ringtone likely playing on your cellphone today. Next week, Dolby will be named the Johns Hopkins University's first Homewood Professor of the Arts - a position that will enable him to help create a new center that will serve as an incubator for technology in the arts.
SPORTS
By Mike Preson and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
The Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team scored seven straight goals in the third quarter to turn a tightly contested game into a rout as the No. 13 Blue Jays defeated visiting No. 18 Towson, 15-8, at Homewood Field. The victory continued Hopkins' dominance in the series; the Blue Jays (2-0) now hold a 39-3 all-time advantage. Towson's last win came in a 13-12 victory on April 27, 1996. Hopkins led 6-5 at halftime, and the teams traded goals in the first three minutes of the third quarter.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
The Johns Hopkins football team's appearance in the Sunday evening unveiling of the NCAA Division III tournament was a mere formality, but the program got a glimpse of its postseason future. The No. 8 Blue Jays will play host to No. 15 Wesley in the first round of the playoffs. The game is scheduled for Saturday at Homewood Field in Baltimore with kickoff expected to occur at 12 p.m. Johns Hopkins had already cemented a berth in the tournament by defeating Franklin & Marshall, 45-30, on Nov. 9 to capture the Centennial Conference title and the automatic bid that accompanies that victory.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | April 30, 1991
State health regulators approved yesterday the Johns Hopkins Health System's plans to close the largest part of its financially ailing Homewood Hospital Center -- agreeing also to at least a temporary shift of the center's psychiatric programs to Union Memorial Hospital.The arrangement appears to satisfy the cries of Hopkins' critics, who charged at a recent public hearing that the loss of Homewood's psychiatric programs would deprive emotionally disturbed residents of Homewood, Charles Village and other midtown neighborhoods of ready access to therapy.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | February 26, 1991
An atmosphere of gloom and anger settled over the Homewood Hospital Center-South yesterday, as word that the financially troubled hospital will be closed within two to three months filtered out to the 650 people who work there.Nurses, physicians, housekeepers and other employees huddled in small groups inside and outside the hospital, talking somberly about the death of a center-city hospital with a family atmosphere and about their uncertain job prospects.Officials with the Johns Hopkins Health System, which acquired the 213-bed hospital in 1985, announced plans to close the hospital during an afternoon meeting attended by about 100 supervisors.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 10, 2013
Johns Hopkins University sophomore Ely Manstein wasn't sure what to make of the flier that Charlotte Zarzar handed him as he was walking along North Charles Street between classes Sept. 3. Manstein, a biophysics major from Philadelphia, studied the card-shaped flier from the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, which is trying to raise public awareness of pedestrian and bicyclist safety as part of its annual Street Smart campaign. In bold letters and numbers, the card told a cautionary story of 32 pedestrians killed and 2,187 injured in traffic accidents in Baltimore from 2009 to 2011, according to three-year crash data by the city Department of Transportation and the Maryland Highway Safety Office.
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