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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Today is the final day for Maryland homeowners to apply by mail for the Homestead Tax Credit, which prevents property taxes from going up more than 10 percent per year (it's a lesser percentage in most counties and Baltimore). Applications will also be accepted in person on Wednesday (read below for details).  The tax credit could save some homeowners hundreds of dollars on their July tax bill. To learn more about the credit, read the related items to the left of this post. The credit only applies to owner-occupied residences.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2012
Maryland homeowners could lose out on hundreds of dollars in tax bill savings if they miss a deadline that's a week away. Many may not realize they must sign up for the Homestead Tax Credit, which saved the average Baltimore homeowner more than $1,000 in the most recent tax year. To receive the credit in property tax bills starting this July, homeowners must sign up by Dec. 31. "When you say the words 'tax credit' to some homeowners, it doesn't really resonate what they're getting out of it," Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
Two men were shot in separate incidents in Baltimore on Wednesday night, according to city police. About 8 p.m., police were called to an area hospital after a man arrived there with a gunshot wound, said Detective Jeremy Silbert, a police spokesman. Police learned hours later from interviewing the victim that he was shot in the 700 block of Pennsylvania Avenue, in the city's Seton Hill neighborhood, Silbert said. The man was wounded in the leg and was receiving treatment, Silbert said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
About 25,000 Baltimore homeowners who received the Homestead Property Tax Credit this year will lose the sometimes-large break if they don't apply for it by Dec. 31, the Baltimore City Council warned Monday. The one-time application is a relatively new requirement — the General Assembly mandated it in 2007 to cut down on ineligibility problems, setting the deadline at the end of this year to give homeowners plenty of time. But Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and other council members are worried that some residents will see their tax bills spike next July because they don't know about the requirement.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Beginning this week, Maryland's Department of Assessments and Taxation can begin penalizing homeowners who received a homestead credit this year as a result of deception. Penalties will be issued on an ad hoc basis as the department learns of violators, said Robert E. Young, Maryland's director of assessments and taxation. "It's going to be interesting to see how many of them there are," he said. The penalty, approved overwhelmingly by the General Assembly, is equal to 25 percent of "the amount of the property tax credit improperly received," according to the fiscal and policy analysis of the law. Homeowners, of course, still are on the hook for reimbursing the state, with interest, the amount they inappropriately saved by using the credit.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Archaeologists have discovered what they think are remains of a barn or blacksmith workshop in North Bethesda that could date to the days of Josiah Henson, a former slave whose autobiography inspired the novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin. " Looking for evidence of what slave life in Maryland was like, archaeologists with the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Montgomery Parks and the PBS program "Time Team America" began exploring the Josiah Henson Special Park on Monday.
EXPLORE
July 11, 2012
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, July 12, 1962: The Town of Bel Air grew by 249 acres as a result of a property annexation acquired by the Commissioners of Bel Air. The property known as "The Homestead," a 300-acre farm, was divided into three parcels. One was owned by the Bel Air Methodist Church, one by the Hanover-Baltimore Corporation and the remainder under contract to the Homestead Development Company, whose plan was to construct a large housing development.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
State auditors are examining how well Maryland's assessments agency has managed the homestead property tax credit, a popular tax break for homeowners that has come under increased scrutiny since The Baltimore Sun revealed that hundreds of city owners were improperly receiving multiple credits. Auditors have been at the Department of Assessments and Taxation for the past two weeks, said its director, Robert E. Young. The goal is to complete a review of the homestead credit program in time for next year's General Assembly session, which starts in January, according to chief auditor Bruce Myers.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Henry Hager, the husband of former first daughter Jenna Bush Hager, is entitled to a $296 property tax discount on his South Baltimore rowhouse for the current tax year, the state Department of Assessments and Taxation says. An article Tuesday in The Baltimore Sun questioned the validity of Hager's homestead credit for the year that began July 1. The credit program is supposed to be available only to owner-occupants, and Hager has rented out the house since August - nearly the entire tax year.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
It's been about a year and a half since former first daughter Jenna Bush Hager and her husband, Henry, reportedly left their South Baltimore rowhouse for new digs in Manhattan. But Henry Hager still owns the Baltimore place — and the couple still enjoys a property tax break that's supposed to be available only to owner-occupants. The Hagers' tax credit this year is small: a $296.40 discount on a tax bill approaching $9,000. Still, why would they get any break as absentee owners? On Friday, a Baltimore Sun reporter knocked on the door of the Hagers' home.
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