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NEWS
By Charlotte Moler and Charlotte Moler,Contributing Writer | September 4, 1994
This fall, as leaves begin to change their hues, another metamorphosis will be happening in Harford County.On the crest of a hill in the heart of Bel Air, the Homestead, a stately three-story house of granite and slate that has been home to some of the county's most prominent families, is being transformed by a volunteer team of professional interior designers.The designers are preparing the Homestead to be the 1994 Decorator Show House in a home tour to benefit the Harford County chapter of the AMC Cancer Research Center.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | October 7, 2014
Homestead-Wakefield Elementary School in Bel Air hosted its 2014 Voting Parade Tuesday morning on the school campus. The parade is held every two years, according to teacher Cindy Leon, to celebrate America's freedom of voting; it has been part of the election year school calendar for 16 years. Students vote on several things in school: favorite super hero, yearbook cover, songs, etc. The winners were announced at the celebration. The Bel Air High School band and the entire Homestead-Wakefield student body marched in the parade, which started at Wakefield and proceeded down the street to the he street to the Homestead building.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1996
Union Mills Homestead chose one of its own to open its bicentennial celebration yesterday.Pam Shriver, six generations from the original founders of the mill and an international tennis star, is serving as the honorary chairwoman of the 200th birthday party.As Shriver gave the audience a brief history of the site, a restored water wheel whirred softly through the stream running along the brick building."As a direct descendant of the brothers who originally cranked the mill, Pam connects history to today," said Barbara Beverungen, director of the county office of tourism.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The City Council gave final approval Monday to a plan to offer up to $5,000 in tax credits to homeowners who move to new homes but choose to remain in the city. The Resident Retention Tax Credits - which will were approved unanimously by the council - are intended to help residents who lose their Homestead tax credits when they switch homes. The program was pushed at the state level by Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat. Her bill allowed city homeowners to transfer a portion of the Homestead tax credit from their old building to a new property.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- Thirty miles north on Florida's Turnpike, Joe Robbie Stadium is dressed for a party, but the festive atmosphere that surrounds tonight's belated opening of the 1995 major-league season does not extend to the Homestead Sports Complex.There are too many people here who did not get an invitation.This is where the Major League Baseball Players Association set up training camp for the scores of free agents who were left unsigned after baseball's eight-month work stoppage came to a sudden end. This is where spring training shifted into reverse . . . where the object of the game was to play your way off the team.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | April 29, 2007
The Union Mills Homestead will be turned into a colorful garden next weekend as the 210-year-old historic Shriver farm is filled with blooming spring flowers for the 38th annual Flower and Plant Market. A variety of plants, including hanging baskets, climbing vines and even small shrubs, can be found by gardeners for their homes and yards. "What really makes it unique is our selection of quality plants and a huge selection of hanging baskets that people can take home and enjoy," said James Shriver III, one of four committee members who heads Homestead's longest-running event.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | April 24, 1991
History is being reborn this week at the Union Mills Homestead as a group of Lancaster, Pa., natives erect a new tannery building in the old-fashioned "barn-raising" style.Last Oct. 25, arson destroyed the remaining portion of the original tannery, built in the early 1800s behind the main house.But with a payment of $49,400 from insurance, the Homestead Foundation was able to arrange to rebuild the tannery, hopefully in time for the opening Flower and Plant Market and Antique Show on May 4-5."
NEWS
By Peter Sigal and Peter Sigal,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 4, 2002
PHLADELPHIA - Through revolutions political, industrial and social, the descendants of Johann Trauger have turned the same soil on the same windswept knoll. "This is the last of God's country left in Bucks County," said J. Howard Roth, looking across a valley to his white cluster of farm buildings amid a sea of tender young hay. With his two children in other lines of work, Roth, 65, is likely to be the last of the Trauger line to work the approximately 150 acres in Nockamixon. "I would have loved to see it go on for another generation," said Roth, a Trauger on his mother's side, with a touch of wistfulness.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
The advertisement for the auction of the old Cockey homestead on York Road tomorrow would seem to be complete, providing a detailed description of the 200-year-old house and a precis of its history. But the ad doesn't tell about the home's "extras" - Joshua F. Cockey and Joshua F. Cockey. The first is the first Joshua Cockey and the builder of the house, which is believed to date to the 1790s, although it doesn't show up on a county map until 1850. The current owner, Judy D'Anna, swears she feels the original owner's friendly spirit in the rambling, native-stone house that sits a stone's throw from busy York Road in, of course, Cockeysville.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1998
Anne Arundel County purchased 12.5 acres of forested land around an 18th-century homestead near Bayside Beach yesterday, providing a buffer from developers and signaling the county's commitment to turn the once-forgotten estate into a park and museum.The county will pay developers of the nearby Hickory Point subdivision, who own the land, $650,000 for two lots next to the Bayside Beach Road homestead known as Hancock's Resolution.Historians are unsure what 18th-century owner William Hancock resolved, but they can say with certainty that the home is rare, tangible evidence of the 18th-century life of Native Americans and the county's first settlers.
NEWS
By Rus VanWestervelt | May 5, 2014
Timonium resident and poet Ann Kolakowski says that what she discovered when her grandmother turned 99 has haunted her to this day. Now, nearly 12 years later, she has published a book of poetry about that discovery. "When my brothers and I were clearing out our grandmother's home when she moved to an assisted living facility," said Kolakowski, "I found a shabby notebook. I opened it and read, 'Marian Brown, Domestic Science/Warren School, Maryland.' I was really confused. " In fact, the town in which her grandmother, Florence Marian Brown Eichler, had spent her childhood and attended Warren School had been bought, razed and flooded in 1921 to create a municipal water supply.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Saying she's convinced Baltimore's high property taxes are driving residents and business away, Del. Maggie McIntosh has introduced legislation aimed at helping retain current homeowners while launching studies of ways to reduce the rate. With support from nearly all the city's House delegation, McIntosh, a six-term Democrat representing Northeast Baltimore, has introduced five bills targeting potential inequities in the assessment of properties in the city, where tax rates are more than double those of neighboring counties.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Police have identified the victim in Saturday night's homicide as 16-year-old Lavar Crawford, who was killed in the 1900 block of E. 28th St. in Coldstream Homestead Montebello. Police did not identify a suspect or motive in the shooting. Officers called to the nearby intersection of Hugo and Harford roads around 11:30 p.m. Saturday found Crawford with a gunshot wound to the head, and medics pronounced him dead in less than 20 minutes, police said. Police later revised their report to say he was shot at E. 28th Street.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
A 61-year-old man was killed when he was hit by an MTA bus in Northeast Baltimore's Coldstream Homestead Montebello neighborhood Thursday night, police said. The man, who police identified as James Payne, of the 8400 block of Roster Ave, had been standing at a bus stop near the corner of East 32nd Street and The Alameda when he bent down and fell in the street, where the bus hit him, police said. Family members at the scene said he had bent up to pick up gloves he had dropped. Police said witnesses at the scene and on the bus gave accounts of the incident, but anyone with information may call the department's accident investigation team at 410-396-2606.
NEWS
May 5, 2013
The Sun recently reported that a third top City Hall employee had contracted the highly contagious "improper homestead tax credit on non-owner occupied homes" disease ("Mayoral aid got tax break for rental property," May 1). Khalil Zaied, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's recently appointed deputy chief of operations, found out in January that he had contracted the disease after receiving improper homestead tax credits for a rental property he owned for several years. Mr. Zaied explained that he remembered reading about this mysterious disease in 2011 but had been so busy with his duties on behalf of the citizens of Baltimore at the time that he didn't realize he had contracted the illness himself.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
A top aide to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake received more than $14,000 in homestead property tax breaks on an East Baltimore rental property he owns, records show, even though only owner-occupied homes qualify for the subsidy under Maryland law. State officials recognized the issue several months ago, and in January the city sent a bill to Khalil Zaied, the mayor's deputy chief of operations, demanding repayment of more than $5,000 for the tax...
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1996
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- Driving out of Miami on the Florida Turnpike, you leave the city behind and enter a kind of twilight zone.It used to be a town of 28,000 people focused on farming and a busy military base. Then Hurricane Andrew blew away most of the houses and stores and flattened Homestead Air Force Base. The population dropped by 12,000 literally overnight. And Homestead that day could have died.From the turnpike you see the giant empty spaces where buildings used to be and fields of what look to be telephone poles, which are the branch-less remains of evergreen and palm trees.
TRAVEL
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff | December 26, 1999
HOT SPRINGS, Va. -- The first thing you spot is the trademark soaring brick tower, which juts out of the breathtaking autumn foliage of the Allegheny Mountains, to which you can pay only scant attention as you navigate winding, two-lane U.S. 220 with a dump truck on your tail and a 500-foot drop and no guardrail outside the left window.This is the Homestead, the magnificent hotel where travelers have been coming since the 18th century, drawn by the area's natural hot springs and their rumored restorative powers.
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