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Homer Simpson

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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 6, 1994
The event of the evening is the return of NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street," with a second-season premiere guest-starring Robin Williams. Don't miss it.* "The Simpsons" (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Sam Neill, the dinosaur expert in "Jurassic Park," guest stars as the local cat burglar in this new episode of "The Simpsons," which has a neighborhood watch group headed by . . . Homer Simpson? Fox.* "Seinfeld" (9-9:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Perennially searching for new "taboo" subjects to broach, tonight's "Seinfeld" offers a subplot involving proper -- and improper -- toilet-stall etiquette in the women's rest room.
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BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,THE MORNING CALL IN ALLENTOWN, PA | April 20, 2008
Who wins your money-spending battles, your inner Mr. Spock or Homer Simpson? For a long time, economists assumed consumers made calculated and logical spending decisions that are in their best interests; that they would act like the always cool and calm Mr. Spock from Star Trek. Problem is, in the real world we often behave like the dopey Homer Simpson of the The Simpsons. Like Homer, we repeatedly get into trouble because of poor and impulsive decisions. You need only look at the rising levels of debt, bankruptcy and mortgage foreclosures, coupled with low savings rates and closets full of ridiculous and never-used junk, to see that somewhere consumers have gone awry with money decisions.
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NEWS
October 29, 2006
The 101 Most Influential People Who Never Lived: How Characters of Fiction, Myth, Legends, Television and Movies Have Shaped Our Society, Changed Our Behavior and Set the Course of History By Allan Lazar, Dan Karlan and Jeremy Salter Neither Beowulf nor Homer Simpson made the list, but lots of other legendary figures did. The authors try to explain the importance of these fictional characters in our lives and then, just to make a little trouble, actually...
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | July 3, 2007
Denise Riccardo was struck first by the Kwik-E-Mart sign out front and the banner beneath it: "Thank you for loitering, please come again," it read. Things were also unusual inside the convenience store: An oversized plastic cutout of beach-ball-bellied Homer Simpson greeted shoppers. Off-color signage, including one warning over the magazine rack that read, "This is not a library!" And the shelves, along with the usual merchandise, were laden with various strange, new products: Buzz Cola.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,THE MORNING CALL IN ALLENTOWN, PA | April 20, 2008
Who wins your money-spending battles, your inner Mr. Spock or Homer Simpson? For a long time, economists assumed consumers made calculated and logical spending decisions that are in their best interests; that they would act like the always cool and calm Mr. Spock from Star Trek. Problem is, in the real world we often behave like the dopey Homer Simpson of the The Simpsons. Like Homer, we repeatedly get into trouble because of poor and impulsive decisions. You need only look at the rising levels of debt, bankruptcy and mortgage foreclosures, coupled with low savings rates and closets full of ridiculous and never-used junk, to see that somewhere consumers have gone awry with money decisions.
NEWS
By Bob Secter and Rick Pearson and Bob Secter and Rick Pearson,Chicago Tribune | May 27, 2007
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -- Forget Lincoln. Illinois' state capital, renowned for its ties to Honest Abe, now wants to be known as the home of Homer Simpson. The Simpsons, the television cartoon satire that inspired cult-like loyalty among millions of viewers worldwide over its 18 years, is set in a never clearly defined but incredibly dysfunctional place called Springfield. That has led to a raging debate about which of the more than 30 U.S. towns named Springfield is the model. Twentieth Century Fox is now exploiting that dispute to gin up publicity for its new full-length The Simpsons Movie, due out in July.
FEATURES
February 21, 2005
Writers Guild prizes go to `Sunshine,' `Sideways' Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind won the best original screenplay award for Charlie Kaufman Saturday night at the 57th Annual Writers Guild Awards. Best adapted screenplay went to Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor for Sideways. Other winners, for TV, included long-form adapted writing to Tony Kushner for Angels in America; episodic drama to "The Supremes" on West Wing; episodic comedy to "Pier Pressure" on Arrested Development and "Ida's Boyfriend" on Malcolm in the Middle; and daytime serial, The Guiding Light.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | July 3, 2007
Denise Riccardo was struck first by the Kwik-E-Mart sign out front and the banner beneath it: "Thank you for loitering, please come again," it read. Things were also unusual inside the convenience store: An oversized plastic cutout of beach-ball-bellied Homer Simpson greeted shoppers. Off-color signage, including one warning over the magazine rack that read, "This is not a library!" And the shelves, along with the usual merchandise, were laden with various strange, new products: Buzz Cola.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | February 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- I interviewed Coretta Scott King once. It cost $5,000. In 1985, I approached the King Center in Atlanta seeking both that interview and permission to use old audio of Mrs. King's husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., for a radio documentary. I was told it would cost five grand for the audio rights, and it was made clear that unless that money was paid, there would be no interview. The ethical constraints of a radio production house are different from those of a news organization; we made the deal.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | December 9, 1993
For me, the most ironically interesting TV battle of the evening comes in the wee hours of the morning, when the Disney Channel's "A Smoky Mountain Christmas" (3:05-4:45 a.m.) is pitted against TBS's late-night showing (3:15-5 a.m.) of "Smokey Bites the Dust." Even so, the place to turn in prime time is Fox for "The Simpsons" and NBC for "Seinfeld."* "The Simpsons" (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Homer has been tempted extramaritally once before on this series, with a waitress at Moe's.
NEWS
By Bob Secter and Rick Pearson and Bob Secter and Rick Pearson,Chicago Tribune | May 27, 2007
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -- Forget Lincoln. Illinois' state capital, renowned for its ties to Honest Abe, now wants to be known as the home of Homer Simpson. The Simpsons, the television cartoon satire that inspired cult-like loyalty among millions of viewers worldwide over its 18 years, is set in a never clearly defined but incredibly dysfunctional place called Springfield. That has led to a raging debate about which of the more than 30 U.S. towns named Springfield is the model. Twentieth Century Fox is now exploiting that dispute to gin up publicity for its new full-length The Simpsons Movie, due out in July.
NEWS
October 29, 2006
The 101 Most Influential People Who Never Lived: How Characters of Fiction, Myth, Legends, Television and Movies Have Shaped Our Society, Changed Our Behavior and Set the Course of History By Allan Lazar, Dan Karlan and Jeremy Salter Neither Beowulf nor Homer Simpson made the list, but lots of other legendary figures did. The authors try to explain the importance of these fictional characters in our lives and then, just to make a little trouble, actually...
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | February 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- I interviewed Coretta Scott King once. It cost $5,000. In 1985, I approached the King Center in Atlanta seeking both that interview and permission to use old audio of Mrs. King's husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., for a radio documentary. I was told it would cost five grand for the audio rights, and it was made clear that unless that money was paid, there would be no interview. The ethical constraints of a radio production house are different from those of a news organization; we made the deal.
FEATURES
February 21, 2005
Writers Guild prizes go to `Sunshine,' `Sideways' Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind won the best original screenplay award for Charlie Kaufman Saturday night at the 57th Annual Writers Guild Awards. Best adapted screenplay went to Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor for Sideways. Other winners, for TV, included long-form adapted writing to Tony Kushner for Angels in America; episodic drama to "The Supremes" on West Wing; episodic comedy to "Pier Pressure" on Arrested Development and "Ida's Boyfriend" on Malcolm in the Middle; and daytime serial, The Guiding Light.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 6, 1994
The event of the evening is the return of NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street," with a second-season premiere guest-starring Robin Williams. Don't miss it.* "The Simpsons" (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Sam Neill, the dinosaur expert in "Jurassic Park," guest stars as the local cat burglar in this new episode of "The Simpsons," which has a neighborhood watch group headed by . . . Homer Simpson? Fox.* "Seinfeld" (9-9:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Perennially searching for new "taboo" subjects to broach, tonight's "Seinfeld" offers a subplot involving proper -- and improper -- toilet-stall etiquette in the women's rest room.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | December 9, 1993
For me, the most ironically interesting TV battle of the evening comes in the wee hours of the morning, when the Disney Channel's "A Smoky Mountain Christmas" (3:05-4:45 a.m.) is pitted against TBS's late-night showing (3:15-5 a.m.) of "Smokey Bites the Dust." Even so, the place to turn in prime time is Fox for "The Simpsons" and NBC for "Seinfeld."* "The Simpsons" (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Homer has been tempted extramaritally once before on this series, with a waitress at Moe's.
NEWS
March 21, 1996
Homer P. Groening, 76, an ad man and filmmaker whose name is immortalized in the television cartoon character Homer Simpson, died Friday in Portland, Ore., of cancer of the lymph system. He was the father of cartoonist Matt Groening, creator of "The Simpsons."Roswell L. Gilpatric, 89, who played a key role in the Cuban missile crisis as deputy secretary of defense, died Friday in New York.Pub Date: 3/21/96
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 30, 2000
SO HERE'S the question: How stupid are you? Let's say on a scale of one to 10, with 10 being the average supermodel. How stupid do you figure? Yes, I know I'm being awfully rude. It's just that lately I find myself deeply annoyed at the way your feeble-mindedness -- and more importantly, mine -- are considered a foregone conclusion by the people who make and market the stuff we buy. I refer you to the fine print of an automotive ad I saw the other day on television. Doesn't matter which one, because they're all the same.
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