Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHomeowners
IN THE NEWS

Homeowners

NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Baltimore officials plan to offer up to $5,000 in tax credits to homeowners who move to new homes but choose to remain in the city. The Resident Retention Tax Credits - which will be introduced before the City Council Monday - are intended to help residents who lose their Homestead tax credits when they switch homes. “This has the potential to be a very effective tool in retaining families and contributing to my goal of growing Baltimore by 10,000 families over the next decade,” Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.  The program was pushed at the state level by Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Up to 300 Baltimore homeowners are seeing a jump in property tax bills because the city says they have received excessive credits for historic renovations, according to a city councilman briefed on the issue. The city has promised not to seek back taxes from homeowners who benefited from miscalculations made by the state. But city officials have made upward adjustments on tax bills starting with the fiscal year that began July 1 - prompting complaints of unfairness from homeowners in the 10-year program.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2000
The Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation is advising homeowners who use unlicensed contractors for home repairs and improvements that they don't have access to the kinds of safeguards put in place by the Maryland Home Improvement Commission. The MHIC offers a guarantee of up to $10,000 for damage caused by a licensed contractor's poor workmanship or failure to perform work. That guarantee is not available to homeowners who use unlicensed contractors, according to the DLLR.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2011
Jeff Burdick and his next-door neighbors have nearly identical two-story rowhouses, on the same block of East Clement Street with the same public schools and the same city trash pickup. But one striking difference is the $5,300 he pays in yearly property taxes — more than both his neighbors combined. The reason behind Burdick's disproportionate tax bill is Maryland's Homestead Property Tax Credit, which caps his neighbors' taxes but not his, because he moved to Riverside many years after they did. "I don't think it's fair," said Burdick, 37, who works in accounting.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1997
Earlier this year, Congress passed a law requiring lenders to notify homeowners when they have built up enough equity to cancel their private mortgage insurance (PMI). Now, there is a business that can help Maryland homeowners through the process.Mortgage Insurance Consultants will provide a homeowner with a market analysis and an appraisal and will submit all documents to the lender for a base fee of $395."That bill basically only applied to people currently getting mortgage insurance," said Barry Nabozby, a consultant to the company, which has opened an office in Pikesville.
BUSINESS
By Adrian B. Miller and Adrian B. Miller,Contributing Writer | September 6, 1992
Sam Catalana is hopping mad. He paid cash for his $82,000 condo just two years ago, hoping to spend his retirement there. Instead, he is spending more money and effort than he bargained for in a legal battle with the condo builder.Mr. Catalana and other homeowners at The Pointe in Abingdon say the 2- and 4-year-old homes in their development were poorly constructed by the builder, Henderson-Webb and The Pointe Inc.The owners say water pours through some of their windows during rainstorms, floors and bearing walls vibrate, and roof trusses are unstable and could collapse under a heavy snow.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1999
The Columbia Association has filed five lawsuits in Howard County Circuit Court, charging homeowners with covenant violations, as it tries to address rising complaints about deteriorating -- or just plain unsightly -- properties in the 30-year-old planned community.The alleged violations range from relocating a fence without permission to failing to trim backyard trees and bushes, to refusing to remove algae from house siding and a deck."I can agree with part of the deal to try to keep this place looking nice," said William Dragovich of Chase Lions Way in Dorsey's Search, who relocated a 5-foot-tall wooden fence and is facing a lawsuit.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
A headline on a story about Geico Corp. in yesterday's Business section incorrectly characterized a transaction between Geico and Aetna Life & Casualty Co. Geico has agreed to transfer, not sell, its homeowners insurance business to Aetna Life & Casualty.The Sun regrets the errors.Geico Corp., the Bethesda insurer, has given up on its relatively small homeowners insurance business and will transfer to Aetna Life & Casualty, the companies said yesterday.Geico writes homeowners policies through a wholly owned insurance agency called Insurance Counselors Inc., which is based in Maryland.
NEWS
July 31, 1992
Low-income homeowners may be able to replace failing septic systems with the help of county money in a program announced this week by County Executive Robert R. Neall.The county is making available $100,000 to finance interest-free deferred loans to help to property owners replace failing systems with innovative alternative septic systems.The program is open to homeowners with incomes ranging from $15,450 to $29,100, depending upon family size. Some money also may be available for families with higher incomes, depending on the circumstances.
NEWS
September 20, 2008
I applaud the efforts by Keith Losoya and R. Paul Warren to demonstrate that the city is leaving millions on the table every year as a result of the underassessment of commercial properties ("Homeowners' burden," Commentary, Sept. 11). The city government needs to recognize that homeowners are one of the city's greatest assets. We help to stabilize and restore neighborhoods, clean and police the streets, and show our commitment to the city by purchasing property here, even though we know the suburbs offer better services for lower taxes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.