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NEWS
By From staff reports | September 24, 1999
In Baltimore CityBrooklyn man, 26, convicted of killing neighbor in her homeChristopher Stanley Mills was convicted of first-degree murder yesterday in the June 1998 stabbing death and attempted robbery of Leona Gast Klimm, 91, his southern Baltimore neighbor.Mills, 26, was arrested by the FBI in a New York City phone booth about three months after Klimm's body was found at her home in the 3500 block of 4th St. in Brooklyn. He was tracked down by tips phoned in to authorities.Baltimore Circuit Judge John C. Themelis will sentence Mills on Nov. 17. An accomplice, Carlos Roy Holcomb, was sentenced to life in prison without parole in the incident.
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NEWS
By Steve Chapman | October 24, 2003
CHICAGO - Our soldiers in Iraq face an array of dangers, including hostile fire, accidents and suicide. But apparently they are not out of the woods once they return to the United States. Here, we are told, they confront another serious hazard: homelessness. "I think that Americans would be shocked to learn that just by serving in the military, you increase your risk of becoming homeless," Linda Boone of the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans (NCHV) recently told National Public Radio.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 4, 1996
PERRY POINT, Md. -- At a time when the federal government is squeezing many social programs, the veterans medical center here, on a serene 400-acre campus on the Chesapeake Bay, has opened a new refuge for people like Stanford Avant.After his discharge from the Marine Corps, with which he served in Vietnam, Mr. Avant spent 25 tortured years "drinking and drugging," as he puts it, on the streets of Wilmington, Del.Now he is 46, and he has been at Perry Point since a sanctuary for homeless veterans opened here in September.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
Eighteen months after she enlisted in the Army, Wanda Porter fell from a 50-foot tower, shattering her feet and ending her military career. Today, after three surgeries, a year in a veterans hospital, a failed marriage, bouts of depression and 17 years of therapy, Porter is taking classes at Baltimore County Community College and planning to complete a degree in psychology. She credits Veterans Affairs with helping her recover and was eager to attend a networking fair especially for women veterans at the Baltimore VA Medical Center on Saturday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 26, 2002
Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake will hold its 47th Thanksgiving turkey dinner from noon to 2:45 p.m. tomorrow at the Baltimore Convention Center, with the help of 275 volunteers to serve the food. More than 2,200 people attended the event last year. In addition to providing a meal, Goodwill will be sponsoring a career fair for dinner guests. Representatives of more than 20 area social service agencies and employers will take part in the fair, and Goodwill's career development staff will provide career counseling and assistance with resume preparation and job searches from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets for the dinner are available through Goodwill and agencies including the city Department of Social Services, the Learning Bank and Bon Secours Family Support Center.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Winter comes this year without one of its smaller mercies.After a decade during which the U.S. Department of Defense distributed 4 million of its unlovely but warm blankets to homeless programs around the country, the money for any more is gone and the supply has run out. At hundreds of shelters, the loss is being felt."
NEWS
By Maxine Waters and Jonathan Shay | August 2, 1994
Washington -- AMERICAN involvement in Vietnam ended two decades ago, and the wounds suffered during the conflict are finally healing.The nation has built memorials to our men and women who fought and died in the war. American companies are establishing business relationships in Hanoi. Hollywood continues to reinterpret how the war touched our national psyche.There is, however, unfinished business.More than 560,000 Vietnam-era veterans received less-than-honorable discharges for such offenses as being absent without leave, using or selling drugs or assaulting their superiors.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
Kenneth Mumford smiled into the mirror and saw a full set of pearly white teeth for the first time in years. He was sitting in a chair at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, where he was being fitted for free dentures last month. The 59-year-old Air Force veteran got his full set of teeth courtesy of the Department of Veterans Affairs, which has been stepping up a dental care program for homeless vets. The idea, VA officials say, is to alleviate pain, improve health and boost self-esteem.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2012
Baltimore police fatally shot a man in West Baltimore Saturday after he slashed an officer who was investigating a burglary complaint, officials said. The shooting occurred at about 12:30 p.m. in the 1600 block of W. Lexington St. Anthony Guglielmi, the department's chief spokesman, said officers received a 911 call for a possible burglary and encountered a man on the third floor of a vacant building. He said the man lunged at the first officer, cutting him on the face. A second officer fired at the suspect multiple times.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski deserves praise for trying to reduce the claims backlog at the Department of Veterans Affairs ("Senate committee taking up VA claims backlog," June 18). Congress should also work on repealing sequestration, which is hurting veterans in particular. Due to the sequester, veterans are being shut out of understaffed Tricare clinics that have furloughed medical staff. Sixty thousand homeless veterans are losing federal housing aid. And children attending military operated schools are losing critical school days.
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