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Homeless Shelters

NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 31, 2008
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon met yesterday with members of a community group north of Little Italy who said they felt angry and "ambushed" over the city's decision to open a homeless shelter in their neighborhood tomorrow. Dixon and eight members of her senior staff tried to reassure the Albemarle Square Community that the shelter for 275 people in an empty city-owned building at 1001 E. Fayette St. would only be open for up to 90 days. Then the former check processing center, located across from the city's main post office, will be occupied by the 250 professional employees of the Baltimore Health Department, which is moving its headquarters from 210 Guilford Ave. near City Hall, Dixon said.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | January 30, 2008
Backers of Annapolis' only homeless shelter are seeking more money from the city and Anne Arundel County to keep pace with escalating construction costs for a new, larger facility planned near Parole. Officials from the Light House asked the City Council Monday night to double its funding in each of the next two fiscal years to $400,000. That would bring the city's total funding for the project to $1 million. The 22,000-square-foot building was expected to cost $6.8 million a year ago, but this week, shelter officials estimated the price tag has risen to $8.5 million.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | January 21, 2008
Anna Cecelia Kahoe, who raised 16 children in a Harford County farmhouse that later became a homeless shelter bearing her name, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 83. Although the shelter has been moved to another location, it is still called Anna's House, in honor of Mrs. Kahoe, as well as a Biblical figure named Anna. "You knew that she had a great compassionate heart because she was just so pleased that her home was being used for this," said shelter director Barbara Jones.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center has resumed operation of its cold-weather shelter program for homeless people in Howard County. This year, 14 churches are to provide shelter for one or two weeks from now through March 16. Church volunteers will also provide meals, transportation, clothing, medicine and laundry services for those in need, including families, who are unable to get into the Grassroots shelter because it is full. Grassroots provides the county's only shelter for homeless people.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | December 14, 2007
Veronica Henderson can cause quite a stir when she's teaching children to read. Several times a year, she paints her face and dons a Cat in the Hat costume on visits to homeless shelters and schools. The spectacle prompts the curious children to assemble quickly and pay close attention, Henderson said. Even the older ones want to get in on the gathering. "The costume is the hook," said Henderson, the custodian of records for the Baltimore County public school system. "The Cat in the Hat is a recognizable character for children of all ages."
NEWS
By Maria Antonieta Uribe and Sam Enriquez and Maria Antonieta Uribe and Sam Enriquez,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico -- The newly homeless men and women of this flooded capital patiently line up to appear on a local TV station that has been broadcasting their messages day and night. They speak quickly, mindful of others waiting. They say they're at a shelter and are OK. Some hold up handwritten signs with cell phone numbers and beg relatives to call. One woman, eight months pregnant, asks viewers for any information about her missing parents. They know it's a long shot. Few buildings have power for TVs. But hope is all that remains for many of the estimated 1 million residents driven from their homes by flooding that still covers more than three-quarters of the Gulf state of Tabasco.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | March 25, 2007
After today, Steven Johnson will be living on the streets again. The 54-year-old former construction worker says he has had Parkinson's disease for five years and has been unable to work or get federal disability income for the past few years. That is why he was one of more than 20 homeless people sleeping on slim mattresses amid their plastic bags and clothing on the floor of St. John Baptist Church in Columbia last week. But, like seasonal operations in other parts of the region, Howard County's annual winter shelter program is coming to an end. With the county's permanent Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center shelter full, more than a dozen religious congregations take turns hosting the nightly shelter for one or two weeks from November through late March.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | December 26, 2006
Mike Zubner woke up on Christmas morning and did what came naturally: He drove to the Jewish Community Center to volunteer. Hundreds of other Jewish people in the region had the same instinct. By 9:30 a.m., three upstairs rooms at the Park Heights building were strewn with gift bags, wrapping paper and crayons.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | December 22, 2006
A day after Baltimore agencies ordered a Greenmount Avenue homeless shelter to shut its doors, officials scrambled yesterday to help the facility's staff repair emergency lights and install fire doors so the facility could reopen. By last night, the men's shelter operated by nonprofit I Can Inc, had fixed the problems identified by city officials and reopened. The men's shelter, at the site of a former Catholic school in the 2200 block of Greenmount Ave., housed about 70 people before fire and housing department inspectors ordered it to close Wednesday, noting numerous code violations.
NEWS
By MARJORIE VALBRUN | April 1, 2006
James Edward Barnes, Vietnam vet, former migrant worker and one-time family man, has an apartment - finally. Granted, the second floor walk-up is not much to look at. It's in a dingy, run-down building in Reservoir Hill and furnished with little more than an old couch, a mattress and box spring, and a kitchen table with a couple of chairs. Still, it's his, and after 25 years of living on the streets, that means something. "It's beautiful," Mr. Barnes says of his new home. "When I put that key in the door, there's no word to describe how it feels.
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