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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Maryland will receive $45.6 million from the Obama administration for housing and local services for the homeless, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday. The Continuum of Care grants will be used to renew support for 215 programs for another year, including more than $21 million for Baltimore-based services. The money will be used for street outreach, assessment programs, transitional and permanent housing, job training and mental health and substance abuse treatment.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Robert V. Hess, who turned his experience as manager of a disabled veterans thrift store into a career as a homelessness solutions expert, died of liver cancer Dec. 24 at his home in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The former Perry Hall resident was 57. After working in Baltimore for 25 years, he held top posts in Philadelphia and New York, where he was commissioner of the Department of Homeless Services. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Bernard Lawrence Hess, a city schools psychologist, and Barbara Ann Neumeister Hess, a DuPont manager.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | February 28, 2009
Using the site of a proposed homeless shelter as a backdrop, Mayor Sheila Dixon announced yesterday that Baltimore will get $31 million in federal funds for homeless services, including $9.5 million in emergency funds under the economic stimulus package. Separately, the Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Foundation said it has pledged $1.8 million of the estimated $8.2 million cost of the proposed shelter, which would be called the Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Housing and Resource Center. The facility, to be on the site of a city building at 620 Fallsway, would be a "modern, clean and welcoming addition to this community," Dixon said during an afternoon news conference.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Maryland will receive $45.6 million from the Obama administration for housing and local services for the homeless, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday. The Continuum of Care grants will be used to renew support for 215 programs for another year, including more than $21 million for Baltimore-based services. The money will be used for street outreach, assessment programs, transitional and permanent housing, job training and mental health and substance abuse treatment.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2002
Baltimore's new homeless services director has a crackerjack resume: degrees from Yale, Princeton and Harvard Law School; stints in the foreign service in Pakistan and El Salvador; multiple fellowships. What Joseph Alexander Boston III doesn't have is experience working directly with homeless people. That, according to the man who hired him, only made Boston more qualified. "We need someone with a clear track record of being able to manage and problem-solve," said Otis Rolley, first deputy housing commissioner.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | November 30, 2006
The head of Baltimore's homeless services division has resigned, pointing to frustration over the slow pace of the agency's transition from public entity to private nonprofit group as a major reason for her departure. Laura M. Gillis' last day on the job was Tuesday, two weeks after city officials, including City Council President Sheila Dixon, unveiled a work group made up of business and social service professionals that will create a plan to end chronic homelessness in 10 years. City Health Commissioner Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein confirmed Gillis' resignation yesterday and praised her for her work during the past two years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Robert V. Hess, who turned his experience as manager of a disabled veterans thrift store into a career as a homelessness solutions expert, died of liver cancer Dec. 24 at his home in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The former Perry Hall resident was 57. After working in Baltimore for 25 years, he held top posts in Philadelphia and New York, where he was commissioner of the Department of Homeless Services. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Bernard Lawrence Hess, a city schools psychologist, and Barbara Ann Neumeister Hess, a DuPont manager.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2000
Baltimore has received an additional $6 million in federal aid for the homeless and will use the money to provide services "beyond a hot meal and a temporary shelter bed," Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday. The new money is on top of $8 million Baltimore already has received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The latest infusion of federal money raises the budget for the city's Office of Homeless Services to $27 million, the largest amount ever, say administration officials.
NEWS
September 8, 2000
THE BALTIMORE City Task Force on Homelessness got 81 advocates, givers, grantwriters, officials and executives fired up about people who have no home. That's the kind of interest and energy the city must have to fight tough problems. Leadership is desperately needed, though, to bring the group's suggestions and the city's goals in line. The task force and city parted ways on the first recommendation -- that the city spin off homeless services to a nonprofit agency. But there's common ground on other points, which include creating day resource centers, where clients can bathe, rest, see a caseworker and link up with treatment and other aid; coordinating outreach services among departments, so those who seek the homeless on the street can help them find better care; and improving shelter standards.
NEWS
July 18, 1995
Almost as important as the $11 million in new federal grants Maryland has obtained to aid homeless people is the way the money was sought. With a 45-day deadline staring them in the face, state officials put together an application combining the needs of 18 jurisdictions with significant homeless populations. Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend was right in thinking the state would be more successful submitting a single application.Maryland was among the top 10 recipients to receive portions of $900 million in available grants from the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Baltimore's Office of Human Services mismanaged a $9.5 million federal grant for helping the homeless by failing to oversee programs and awarding cash for services that may not have been eligible, auditors announced Thursday. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development audit found that city officials did not understand their responsibilities and did not develop a plan before rapidly awarding money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, President Barack Obama's signature 2009 stimulus plan.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 24, 2012
Are there no limits on government's power, no places where it cannot go? New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, a former (thankfully) Republican, has decided to limit food donations to city charities, including homeless shelters, because the government is unable to measure the nutritional value of the food. Who in city government believes that a homeless person with no access to money other than what he or she might panhandle cares about the nutritional content of food? If they are able to scrounge up a few bucks on the streets, does anyone seriously think they're headed to a grocery store to buy carrots and arugula?
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Baltimore officials have spent nearly $65,000 over the past six months bringing homeless people to overflow shelters, according to city spending documents. The city opened a new $8 million shelter last year that offered private showers, laundry facilities, computers -- and provided 100 fewer beds . That's a problem because Baltimore's homeless population has grown exponentially in recent years.  Outreach workers counted 4,100 homeless people on a January night last year, but noted 3,400 two years earlier.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
The clean, bright hallways of Baltimore's new homeless shelter lead to laundry rooms, private showers and a cluster of computers. The building outshines in nearly every regard the temporary facility it replaced, advocates say. But the $8 million shelter does not measure up to its predecessor in one respect: It has 100 fewer emergency beds. As temperatures fall, Baltimore officials are scrambling to come up with a plan for sheltering the city's growing homeless population on the coldest nights.
EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
Editor: Upon review of the recent editorial in The Aegis that highlighted the issue of homelessness in the county, I think it is important to point out how complex this issue is. The phenomenon of homelessness is not a seasonal issue, rather the tragedy that affects far too many individuals and families in Harford County. Resources, though available, are stretched throughout the year to serve hundreds of people coming through the doors of community and nonprofit organizations.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 13, 2010
After two back-to-back storms that left Baltimore struggling under a double layer of snow, several city residents said they were grateful to have access to some basic resources - even if they could not call them their own. Alvesta Williamson, 41, has been staying at Baltimore's 24-hour shelter for about five months, after a short detour in Oklahoma. "It could be a lot worse," he said. "People could be on the street." The city's 24-hour, year-round homeless shelter, which has about 350 beds at 210 Guilford Ave. and an 80-bed overflow location, welcomed anyone who came in through the storm, said Diane Glauber, president of Baltimore Homeless Services.
NEWS
February 2, 2009
The call came to Greg Sileo's City Hall office on a day in late November. A 22-year-old father needed help. The mother of his two children had left them, he was out of work and homeless; he, his year-old son and 2-year-old daughter had slept in an abandoned house the night before. Within 48 hours, Mr. Sileo brought to bear all that Baltimore Homeless Services could provide, and the young family moved into a two-bedroom, semi-furnished apartment thanks to a helpful landlord. City social services found day care for the children, so the dad could participate in job training for which he qualified.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
With six months to go before moving into their new $15.5 million building on the Fallsway, Health Care for the Homeless officials gave Mayor Sheila Dixon a hard-hat tour Thursday. The three-story building with a partial green roof is walking distance from Our Daily Bread and the city's planned 148-bed emergency shelter and housing resource center. Dixon said having homeless services in one area "maximizes the support people need to get back on their feet." Jeff Singer, president and chief executive officer of Health Care for the Homeless, said the buildings' proximity to one another will "promote synergy" because the providers can walk people from one place to the next and save on transportation.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | February 28, 2009
Using the site of a proposed homeless shelter as a backdrop, Mayor Sheila Dixon announced yesterday that Baltimore will get $31 million in federal funds for homeless services, including $9.5 million in emergency funds under the economic stimulus package. Separately, the Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Foundation said it has pledged $1.8 million of the estimated $8.2 million cost of the proposed shelter, which would be called the Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Housing and Resource Center. The facility, to be on the site of a city building at 620 Fallsway, would be a "modern, clean and welcoming addition to this community," Dixon said during an afternoon news conference.
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