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NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 27, 1992
Be patriotic. Take a homeless person to Dolphins-Saints football practice at Memorial Stadium on Aug. 28, the hottest night of the year.The Bush administration finally came up with a jobs program. For Soviet nuclear bomb makers.Good news for Bill Clinton. They are talking up his sex life as if he were otherwise unstoppable.Tell Saddam Hussein not to acquire any more weapons. The Pentagon isn't.Cheer up. Congressman Cardin's better puppy bill will save us.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 18, 2013
Harford County's observance of National Homeless Persons' Memorial Day will be held on Thursday, Dec. 19, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in Frederick Ward Armory Park at 41 N. Main St. in Bel Air. According to the Harford County Health Department, people experiencing homelessness are three to four times more likely to die prematurely than their sheltered counterparts, based on a study released by National Health Care for the Homeless Council. In remembrance of those who have died too early as a result of their homelessness, communities across the nation have observed National Homeless Persons' Memorial Day for the past three decades.
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FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2001
You're an 18-year-old freshman in art school, away from your cozy little suburban home in New Jersey or Kansas or California, plunked down in a strange dormitory in the hard-scrabble city of Baltimore, and for the first time you understand that hard-scrabble is not just an amusingly clunky word and that homeless is sort of like what you're feeling but nothing like what you've just seen on the sidewalk this morning. What you've seen is abominable. And you feel a little disturbed. In September, on his first day in Baltimore, Ben Harris saw a homeless man sleeping atop a grim pile of rubbish, and he felt just that way. He had never seen a homeless person curled in the refuse of a broken-down building before.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Emotional stories of loss and recovery choked up those who spoke from experience about being homeless and those who advocate for them at a student forum held Tuesday at Howard Community College. "Our mission is to get all of you fired up about alleviating the effects of poverty," Deepak Chadha, a volunteer with the Community Action Council of Howard County, told the gathering of 75 students. The council, a nonprofit founded in 1964, joined with three men from the Baltimore Faces of Homelessness Speakers Bureau to present the program.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
The homeless man had a minor legal problem and a serious drinking problem. Staff at the Homeless Persons Representation Project tried to direct him to a clinic for the homeless, hoping he would walk the six blocks to find out about a detoxification program. Instead, he just left.For Baltimore's homeless population, estimated at 2,600 on any given night, finding the help they need can involve an overwhelming obstacle course through city streets, as they trudge from agency to agency, in between the searches for shelter and food.
NEWS
By Ryan Justin Fox and By Ryan Justin Fox,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2001
As yesterday slipped into the longest night of the year, advocates for the homeless gathered outside City Hall in a symbolic memorial service for the 44 homeless people who died in Baltimore this year. Gestures aimed at ending homelessness in the city highlighted the hourlong event at War Memorial Plaza, which marked National Homeless Person's Memorial Day. One by one, city officials and community leaders "buried" in a small casket things they said contribute to homelessness. Leslie Leitch, the city's director of homeless services, threw in a jumbled mass of red adhesive tape, which she said represented the bureaucracy that hinders help for the homeless.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
An unidentified homeless man spending the night on a strip of grass across St. Paul Street from Mercy Medical Center apparently set himself on fire by accident and burned to death early yesterday, city police said. A Mercy security guard spotted the man in flames and tried to douse the fire with a jacket, a hospital spokesman said. Firefighters and police officers arrived about 5:40 a.m. and pronounced the man dead, said Officer Nicole Monroe, a police spokeswoman. Kevin Lindamood, spokesman for Health Care for the Homeless, said police told him the man lit a fire inside his cardboard encampment, was overcome by the smoke and fell into the flames.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | April 18, 1991
For the Rev. Tom Bonderenko, homeless people are like lighted candles that brighten a home but are taken for granted."A lighted candle is something we take for granted," Bonderenko, director of Our Daily Bread soup kitchen on Franklin Street, said last night at a memorial service for the homeless who died this winter."
EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
Editor: Upon review of the recent editorial in The Aegis that highlighted the issue of homelessness in the county, I think it is important to point out how complex this issue is. The phenomenon of homelessness is not a seasonal issue, rather the tragedy that affects far too many individuals and families in Harford County. Resources, though available, are stretched throughout the year to serve hundreds of people coming through the doors of community and nonprofit organizations.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | October 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Hundreds of homeless people in Baltimore were left out of the 1990 population count due to negligence and incompetence by the U.S. Census Bureau, according to homeless advocates in Baltimore who filed a federal suit against the Bush administration yesterday.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia, accuses the Census Bureau of failing even to attempt a complete count of homeless Americans.The resulting undercount will deprive many areas of federal grant money, including money for homelessness programs, that is distributed according to population levels, the plaintiffs contend.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 8, 2012
Columnist Leonard Pitts wrote a story for the front page of last Sunday's Charlotte Observer indicting both parties for failing to speak up for the poor. He inspired this column. I could be writing the expected narrative from a conservative at the Democratic National Convention but have chosen instead to acknowledge that Mr. Pitts, though a lefty, is right. If the Democrats and Republicans aren't talking about the greater goal of helping the poor become un-poor (rather than just sending them a check to sustain them in their poverty)
EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
Editor: Upon review of the recent editorial in The Aegis that highlighted the issue of homelessness in the county, I think it is important to point out how complex this issue is. The phenomenon of homelessness is not a seasonal issue, rather the tragedy that affects far too many individuals and families in Harford County. Resources, though available, are stretched throughout the year to serve hundreds of people coming through the doors of community and nonprofit organizations.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 28, 2008
There was thud and crackle when I stepped out of the car the other evening - my foot landing on a frozen puddle in a driveway and punching a hole in the ice. That's how cold it was, and I'm guessing 10 degrees colder than when I'd left downtown Baltimore just 50 minutes earlier. It had taken me that long to reach the country road where Steve Shaw said I'd find the "suburban homeless" woman. "I am active with the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore," Shaw had introduced himself six weeks ago. "Many times during our meetings, the leaders speak of the homeless in downtown and ways to help ... which brings me to the suburban homeless thing."
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
An unidentified homeless man spending the night on a strip of grass across St. Paul Street from Mercy Medical Center apparently set himself on fire by accident and burned to death early yesterday, city police said. A Mercy security guard spotted the man in flames and tried to douse the fire with a jacket, a hospital spokesman said. Firefighters and police officers arrived about 5:40 a.m. and pronounced the man dead, said Officer Nicole Monroe, a police spokeswoman. Kevin Lindamood, spokesman for Health Care for the Homeless, said police told him the man lit a fire inside his cardboard encampment, was overcome by the smoke and fell into the flames.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 29, 2004
In Baltimore County Pikesville man killed in car accident on I-695 inner loop WOODLAWN - A 23-year-old Pikesville man was killed early yesterday after he lost control of his Ford Focus on the Beltway's inner loop in Woodlawn and barreled into two other cars, state police reported. The victim, Charles Michael Smith of the 500 block of Marshall Ave., was trapped in the car, which flipped several times and came to rest partially on a concrete barrier between the inner and outer loops at the Interstate 70 exit, said Tfc. Tyrone Powell.
NEWS
By Ryan Justin Fox and By Ryan Justin Fox,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2001
As yesterday slipped into the longest night of the year, advocates for the homeless gathered outside City Hall in a symbolic memorial service for the 44 homeless people who died in Baltimore this year. Gestures aimed at ending homelessness in the city highlighted the hourlong event at War Memorial Plaza, which marked National Homeless Person's Memorial Day. One by one, city officials and community leaders "buried" in a small casket things they said contribute to homelessness. Leslie Leitch, the city's director of homeless services, threw in a jumbled mass of red adhesive tape, which she said represented the bureaucracy that hinders help for the homeless.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Emotional stories of loss and recovery choked up those who spoke from experience about being homeless and those who advocate for them at a student forum held Tuesday at Howard Community College. "Our mission is to get all of you fired up about alleviating the effects of poverty," Deepak Chadha, a volunteer with the Community Action Council of Howard County, told the gathering of 75 students. The council, a nonprofit founded in 1964, joined with three men from the Baltimore Faces of Homelessness Speakers Bureau to present the program.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
The gifted and talented class at Centennial Elementary School in Ellicott City saved the best for last.On Friday, the last day of school for county students, the students ended a year-long project by presenting a $236.63 check to Health Care for the Homeless, a Baltimore-based agency that provides medical care and social services to homeless people throughout the state.The class of fourth- and fifth-graders spent the year learning about homelessness, and students came up with a way to do their part.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2001
You're an 18-year-old freshman in art school, away from your cozy little suburban home in New Jersey or Kansas or California, plunked down in a strange dormitory in the hard-scrabble city of Baltimore, and for the first time you understand that hard-scrabble is not just an amusingly clunky word and that homeless is sort of like what you're feeling but nothing like what you've just seen on the sidewalk this morning. What you've seen is abominable. And you feel a little disturbed. In September, on his first day in Baltimore, Ben Harris saw a homeless man sleeping atop a grim pile of rubbish, and he felt just that way. He had never seen a homeless person curled in the refuse of a broken-down building before.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 1998
NEW YORK -- It is the most Manhattan of shows, and here comes the cast, walking down marble staircases and onto the lobby's terrazzo floor, their faces lighted by the gilt ceiling and original chandeliers: the flight attendant looking for a taxi to Kennedy, the recovering homeless crack head headed for a counseling job, the struggling actress late for the rehearsal of her own one-woman play about Emma Goldman, the New York City anarchist.But will it play in Charm City? This is the Times Square Hotel, the model Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has in mind for a downtown housing complex for homeless people, the elderly and students.
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