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NEWS
December 13, 2011
Reducing access to life-saving Code Blue shelter services gives us the chills ("City revises emergency cold weather criteria," Dec. 8). Each year, too many of our homeless neighbors experience frostbite, amputations and even death because they lack adequate shelter. The National Coalition for the Homeless reports that 700 homeless people in the U.S. die every year from hypothermia. These are entirely preventable deaths. In Baltimore, we commemorate some of these deaths on Homeless Persons Memorial Day, Dec. 21, the longest night of the year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Ravens veteran Steve Smith will be honored Sept. 30 by the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty. The five-time Pro Bowl wide receier will be honored at the 16th annual McKinney-Vento Awards in Washington, D.C. Smith will receive the Stewart B. McKinney Award. Smith and his wife, Angie, established the Steve Smith Family Foundation to champion the cause of the homeless, advocate against domestic violence and help families in need. awilson@baltsun.com twitter.com/RavensInsider    
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Ravens veteran Steve Smith will be honored Sept. 30 by the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty. The five-time Pro Bowl wide receier will be honored at the 16th annual McKinney-Vento Awards in Washington, D.C. Smith will receive the Stewart B. McKinney Award. Smith and his wife, Angie, established the Steve Smith Family Foundation to champion the cause of the homeless, advocate against domestic violence and help families in need. awilson@baltsun.com twitter.com/RavensInsider    
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
After her mother died in 2010, Sidney Allen could no longer afford the rent on the home they shared and spent the next three years bouncing between friends' couches and short-term rentals, without a home to call her own. Her homelessness ended in April, six months after meeting with a Bon Secours case worker, when she moved into a house on Smallwood Street. She pays $200 a month for it, thanks to one of 650 federal housing vouchers set aside for the homeless as part of the city's 10-year campaign to address the problem in the city.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
More than one-third of Baltimore's homeless may be eligible for Social Security benefits, but only 4 percent are receiving aid, in part because of an impersonal review system that frustrates the most dogged applicants.The chain of paperwork takes a minimum of three months if an applicant is approved on the first try. Sixty percent of all applicants have to appeal initial rulings against them, drawing the wait out to more than six months.Factor in the special problems of the homeless, about one-third of whom are mentally ill, and the difficulty in matching people to services becomes even greater, homeless advocates and Social Security workers agree.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | March 23, 2008
Fire investigators are trying to find out whether homeless people might have sparked a four-alarm fire that destroyed a large warehouse south of Camden Yards early yesterday. The blaze was reported at 1:30 a.m. by motorists on Interstate 695 who saw flames shooting from the building on the corner of Haines and Warner streets, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a spokesman for the Baltimore Fire Department. He said the "big, orange ball of fire, with a thick plume of smoke," was also visible from Interstates 95 and 395. More than 100 firefighters and support personnel were summoned to the fire, which tore through the building's roof and collapsed all but two exterior brick walls.
NEWS
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 22, 1998
As Timothy Shands lighted a candle yesterday at the ninth annual Homeless Person's Memorial Day vigil, he thought of the possibility that he, too, could have died on Baltimore's streets."
NEWS
September 4, 2001
SHE SAYS HERS is the yellow house with the green shutters. The one on her Northeast Baltimore block with the deck out front and the basketball goal near the drive. If you press Debbie Simpson, she'll use a house number to describe where she lives. But it's not a telling detail to her. What matters are the particulars, the things she couldn't imagine when she was crack-addicted and living "pillar to post" in West Baltimore. "Home," says the 36-year-old Simpson, sitting in her living room.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporter | December 18, 2006
The main hallway in Baltimore County's emergency shelter is a place where the hungry wait in line for food. A couple curse at each other. Children run around. Babies cry. And when it is time for sleep, blue gym mats are placed on the floors, and dozens of people lie side by side, leaving barely enough room to walk. The shelter, in a brick building near Franklin Square Hospital Center, wasn't always so crowded. But the number of people who have stayed there in the past year has increased drastically - as the number in Baltimore County seeking help with food, heating bills and other needs also has surged, according to county officials and advocates for the needy.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Until two months ago, Tammye Brooks had a job and a roof over her head in Brooklyn Park. But the 52-year-old woman lost them both and, desperate, moved to Baltimore, where she lives in a downtown shelter. Brooks, a longtime Anne Arundel County resident, now counts herself among the city's homeless population. She's also one of hundreds - potentially thousands - of people who were expected to be counted and surveyed yesterday during Baltimore's biennial effort to tally its number of homeless people.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Baltimore authorities said they transported nearly five dozen people to shelters Monday and Tuesday as the coldest air in 20 years broke records in Maryland. Connor Scott, a spokesman for the city Office of Emergency Management, said that as of 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, officials had made contact 92 times with homeless people and took 59 of them to shelters to escape the cold. In some cases, people initially refused to go to shelters and were checked on twice by authorities, so the number includes some double-counting, Scott said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Baltimore came within two degrees of breaking a record for cold temperatures Saturday morning, with a chance for freezing rain ahead Sunday and more single-digit lows forecast next week. Temperatures fell to 6 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport early Saturday. The record low for Saturday's date is 4 degrees, set in 1918. It was only the fifth time single-digit temperatures were recorded at BWI and the coldest temperature measured there since January 2009.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
Was I the only one to be stunned by the $106 million cost for the state's health exchange website? In the Obamacare culture we have become numb to "everyday" $100 million mistakes ( "Health exchange officials face deadline for repairs," Dec. 9). For what Gov. Martin O'Malley and company have wasted, we could have housed all 5,000 of Baltimore's homeless people in relative comfort for the next 20 years. Joe Migliara - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
We will try not to judge too harshly those on the Baltimore City Council who are supporting a crackdown on panhandling — just as they should not judge too harshly those who are doing the panhandling. A poverty of ideas is just another form of poverty. Not to put too fine a point on it, but Baltimore already has a decade-old law on the books that prohibits aggressive panhandling. Examples of outlawed behavior include refusing to take no for an answer, following or touching people on the street or swearing at them.
NEWS
October 13, 2013
In the 1950s, Americans regarded the suburbs as gateways to middle-class prosperity. Highways, the GI Bill and the Federal Housing Administration all helped fuel the growth of a new residential frontier for the Greatest Generation, and millions of Americans took advantage of the opportunity they represented to leave the cares of city life behind. But in the 60 years since then, the reality of suburban living has changed. The tree-lined developments with spacious lawns and a car (or two)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
First came the decorations for the bags: a few words of inspiration, a drawing, and a heart with a pound sign scrawled inside. Next came the lunch: a turkey sandwich, an apple, an Oreo cookie and a water bottle — with most of the food paid for, and prepared by, Coppin State University students. And then came the social media campaign. The students huddled for photos to post on Instagram and Twitter, tagging their entries with #HashTagLunchBag, as they became the first Baltimore group to participate in an effort to feed homeless people that has been spread through social networking sites.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
Calling it illegal and discriminatory, witnesses lambasted and condemned last night a Baltimore City Housing Authority plan to abruptly end a tenant selection process that gives preference to the poorest of the poor.Speaking at a 90-minute hearing at Dunbar High School, speakers warned that elimination of a so-called federal preference system could also have dire consequences, increasing the number of homeless people in the city -- even leading to deaths.Brandishing a brick from a demolished city public housing project and a bag of ashes, Brendan Walsh of Viva House, a homeless shelter, called the proposal "an outrage" that pits "the poor against the working poor."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1995
NEW MARKET -- If Carl Freundel wanted only to entertain, his drama students could easily sell out Linganore High School's auditorium with a light-hearted musical, such as "Guys and Dolls."But Mr. Freundel, a drama teacher at the Frederick County school who also is a playwright, seeks to challenge his students. And his audience. He wants people to think, to see something with social relevance.So the school production this fall was "Hunger," a play with music and dance that was written by Mr. Freundel.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 23, 2013
Harford County was recently awarded nearly $867,000 in grant funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Continuum of Care, or CoC, Program to help homeless people find shelter and other services. The funding increased about 6 percent from the previous year and last year's funding and will account for the increased fair market rents, the county government said in a news release. "We are very pleased with HUD's decision to increase CoC funding in Harford County, allowing us to give more to the nonprofits who serve our most vulnerable citizens," stated Harford County Executive David Craig.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 24, 2013
While several homeless people gathered on benches on the plaza outside City Hall on Palm Sunday, a crowd of 60 churchgoers from congregations around Baltimore stood at the front door to pray for them - and for other needs facing the community - at the 10th annual Blessing of the City. "Thank you for letting us pray for the homeless today," said Kealiel Collins, 11, a parishioner of Metropolitan United Methodist Church in Lafayette Square, to God and the crowd. "Give the homeless their place in the world.
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