Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHomeless Families
IN THE NEWS

Homeless Families

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
Elizabeth Newton wakes up 5 a.m. each day to prepare breakfast for her family and more than 150 other homeless residents at the Baltimore County East Side Shelter. She leaves a bunk beneath her daughter's, in a room shared with dozens of other women, as her husband, John, and son Timothy, 12, catch another hour of sleep on blue mats that look like equipment from a high school gym. John and Timothy sleep on the shelter's dining-room floor; Elizabeth hasn't shared a bed with her husband since they moved in more than three months ago. It's been a tough adjustment for the Newtons, who just last year shared their own single-family home in Snow Hill.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The nonprofit St. Vincent de Paul of Baltimore announced Monday that it would use a $1.5 million grant to expand it's rapid re-housing program to serve 195 homeless families over the next three years. The grant, which comes from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, will expend the Front Door Program to serve 65 families a year, up from 50. Families represent about a third of all homeless in Baltimore. The Front Door Program, which supports the city's 10-year plan to end homelessness, assists families in locating market-rate rental homes in communities where their children are in school and the family has existing support systems, according to the nonprofit.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
An innovative residential program to help homeless families is scheduled to open this summer in two abandoned buildings at the Rosewood Center in Baltimore County.Using a combination of federal, state and county resources -- as well as donated services from local developer Willard Hackerman -- the program is supposed to provide counseling and other services to help homeless families find and resettle in homes.Up to 24 families will stay at the center at any given time, living in apartments for an average of six to nine months while they receive job training, drug counseling and other services from county agencies, said Christopher Tawa, administrator of development finance at the state's Community Development Administration housing program.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
There is clearly an immediate need for housing among homeless families in Baltimore County. However, while the construction of low-income housing developments may temporarily alleviate the problem, over the long run it will only produce larger areas of concentrated poverty that ensure the majority of these families remain trapped in poverty for generations to come ( "Just saying no isn't good enough," Nov. 20). One has only to look at what happened in Baltimore City over the last 50 years, when large tracts of high-rise buildings designed exclusively for low-income housing were developed.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | January 2, 2006
Baltimore-area homeless families will soon have a new option: 17 area religious congregations have combined forces to offer housing, food and support specifically designed for such families. The group, the Baltimore Interfaith Hospitality Network, will house up to 14 people - usually two or three families - at seven area places of worship. The network includes Baptist, Catholic and Presbyterian churches, as well as a synagogue and a Baha'i temple. The congregations are in the city and in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam and Brian Sullam,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Carroll County may lose one of its two shelters for homeless families if it cannot get federal funding restored, according to officials who work with the homeless.On Wednesday, they were notified that Gov. William Donald Schaefer rejected their request for a $32,000 Emergency Services grant that enables them to operate an apartment where homeless families can be sheltered."This is very unfair," said Karen Blandford, the chairman of the Human Services Program, which runs the county's homeless shelters.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2004
Toni Volk has seen some horror stories during her four years as executive director for Congregations Concerned for the Homeless. But she has also helped make some dreams come true. CCH is a nonprofit volunteer organization of about 35 Howard County congregations established in 1990 that works to get homeless families back on their feet and headed in the right direction. The group gives families a place to live and plenty of guidance during a two-year period -- and can be there for them afterward, too. "We want to open doors to the future," Volk said.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | March 8, 1991
As Baltimore embarks on a project aimed at improving the way services are delivered to homeless families, officials learned yesterday that the city could receive an additional $300,000 from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.The foundation selected Baltimore last fall as one of nine cities across the country to participate in its Homeless Families Programs and awarded the city $300,000, including 140 vouchers for housing from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. But yesterday Steven A. Schroeder, president of the foundation, announced that if the participating cities develop effective programs with the initial grants, they will get more money in two years.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | December 15, 1991
A delay in improvements to Moores Mill Road in Bel Air could soon benefit a group that assists homeless families.Holy Family House Inc., a non-profit volunteer group started by the county's 11 Episcopalchurches, is considering leasing a house that sits on land the county bought when it purchased property so Moores Mill Road can be widened. The road runs between Route 543 and Hickory Avenue.The group wants the house to be used as a transitional shelter tohelp homeless families become financially self-sufficient, said BillWhite, a member of the Holy Family House board of directors.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 23, 1996
A mortgage banker, a lawyer and the founder of homes and shelters for abused children and homeless families were honored by the Baltimore Urban League last night at the group's annual Equal Opportunity Dinner.The civil rights group presented its Whitney M. Young Award to:* Alexander Avella Jr., president of Amerifirst Mortgage Corp. since 1969, for his commitment to local and national housing initiatives. He has been active with Neighborhood Housing Services of New York and with real estate and mortgage banking groups.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
J.T. Barker sometimes lives in the woods near Veterans Park in Dundalk and at other times sleeps in the shadows of an industrial park. On a recent hot and muggy day, the 43-year-old homeless man found a little relief in the air conditioning at the Health Care for the Homeless Baltimore County medical clinic where he goes about once a month for free treatment. This day he needed a refill for his asthma medication. Located on the campus of MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center in Rosedale, the tiny clinic provides primary care and referrals for specialty services to treat mental illness and substance abuse among the homeless.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 18, 2013
Harford Family House presents its 4th Annual Harford Mutual Home Runs for the Homeless event Aug. 6 at Ripken Stadium. Teams of four can have a "real baseball experience," changing in the team locker room, taking batting practice in the batting cage and sitting in the dugout. Each player will bat from home plate in Ripken Stadium, with 15 pitches to try to hit a home run. The player's names will be announced as they bat, with play-by-play commentary as their photo appears on the giant scoreboard.
EXPLORE
April 22, 2013
On Sunday, April 14, the Business Among Moms group hosted a vendor fair and silent auction to benefit Harford Family House, a homeless shelter for families with children. The event was held at El Rodeo Restaurant, which donated the space for the vendors and will add to the proceeds 15 percent of the food sales for that day. The event was organized by Sherri Werther, a hairdresser at Split Endz Salon at the Festival in Bel Air. Through sponsorships, the group raised more than $600 which will house a homeless mother, father or child at Harford Family House for 24 days at just $25 per day. The event featured everything from Sentsy Candles to handmade soaps and jewelry, all products sold by the members of the group who are direct retailers and owners of their own businesses.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
A team of 90 volunteers painted and cleaned the playground at the Pratt House this week to prepare the site for an overhaul next month. College students, part of Students Today Leaders Forever, joined Volunteers of America Chesapeake to enhance the playground at the 35-unit apartment complex for formerly homeless families with two or more children. The recreational area will be rebuilt in April with new equipment for the children, who helped design their dream playground. The students from Minnesota and North Dakota are taking part in the Pay it Forward Tour, which offers an alternative spring break trip.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
A few months ago, things were looking bleak for Brooklyn Homes resident Christina Stocks. The 27-year-old single mother of two took a pay cut at work and fell behind in her rent payments. She was facing eviction - and a Christmas on the streets. Searching the Internet for some sort of help, Stocks came across the United Way's Family Stability Initiative. She called, and everything changed. The organization helped Stocks out with her rent - keeping the family in their apartment - and provided her with groceries and Christmas presents.
EXPLORE
February 7, 2012
Editor: In light of the recent tragic death of two of our homeless members in Aberdeen, Giving Hope Ministries would like to take this time to thank you for volunteering your time, donations and the warm place in your heart for our homeless families. We cannot express the gratitude we feel for your care, concern and dedication that you have shown in support of our efforts to feed the homeless and to aid in their welfare and well being during these cold winter months and throughout the year.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON - On any given night, as many as 15,000 Washington-area residents are homeless, and that number is slowly growing, chiefly because more families are becoming homeless, government officials and advocacy groups say.Steve Cleghorn, deputy director of the nonprofit Community Partnership for the Prevention of Homelessness, said there are more homeless families because there are more single-parent families.Nationally, single-parent households climbed from 12.3 million in to 15.4 million in 1995, U.S. Census Bureau figures show.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 9, 1999
NEW YORK -- A state court ordered a temporary halt yesterday to the Giuliani administration's plan to make homeless families work for shelter, characterizing a measure that would place the children of people who fail to meet the requirement in foster care as frightening."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
For a few hours after school, Ryan Johnson is just like most 16-year-olds. He lounges on the couch with his favorite Xbox game or checks his Facebook page. But then reality sets in. He decamps from his cousins' house for the Howard County cold-weather shelter. Dinner is a meal with his father and 20 other homeless people. He goes to bed early, on a green plastic mat next to strangers, who also have no other place to go in one of the state's wealthiest counties. "It has been really hard," said Ryan, a junior at Wilde Lake High School in Columbia.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Baltimore County's annual homeless count found 881 people without a permanent place to stay, a slight decline from last year, while surveyors found 291 single- and two-parent families. The overall count changed by only 10 people, unlike in 2010, when the total jumped 25 percent. But officials as well as faith and community groups remain concerned with the level of first-time and family homelessness, said Sue Bull, the county's coordinator of homeless services. This year's survey was the first to have a category for homeless families "There is a notable difference in the number of chronically homeless families, most of which are headed by a single parent," Bull said Baltimore County, like jurisdictions across Maryland and the nation, has seen an increasing number of parents seeking emergency housing with their children.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.