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HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Almost 30 years ago, Health Care for the Homeless was founded in Baltimore to help people "falling through the cracks" of the health care system; now the organization has created a program to ensure that people don't fall through the cracks of its own system. "We needed to make sure we were getting beyond these four walls," said the organization's CEO Kevin Lindamood, as he sat in the organization's clinic at 421 Fallsway. "To serve those that are so vulnerable they're not able to make it here.
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HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Almost 30 years ago, Health Care for the Homeless was founded in Baltimore to help people "falling through the cracks" of the health care system; now the organization has created a program to ensure that people don't fall through the cracks of its own system. "We needed to make sure we were getting beyond these four walls," said the organization's CEO Kevin Lindamood, as he sat in the organization's clinic at 421 Fallsway. "To serve those that are so vulnerable they're not able to make it here.
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NEWS
June 13, 2014
We are looking to open vacant government buildings to shelter illegal immigrants but we won't open them up for our own homeless citizens ( "Immigrant children's center eyed for city ," June 10). Am I missing something here? Wayne Kirschnick, Annapolis Junction - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Baltimore County plans to shorten shelter stays, increase outreach to people on the streets and expand job-seeking help under a 10-year plan to reduce homelessness. Helping people find a path to self-sufficiency was the focus as county officials and advocates unveiled the long-term plan Thursday. They want to break stereotypes, too. "We have to educate our county residents that homelessness isn't the guy panhandling on the street," County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said. Kamenetz described being shocked after hearing a few years ago from a man he grew up with.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
As a 44 year resident of Baltimore City, I cannot think of a better use of my taxes than paying to temporarily house the homeless individuals who are about to be evicted by the city from their meager camp in motels while they wait for permanent housing ("Homeless eviction plan criticized," March 5). Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's comments that doing so is "not a responsible use of taxpayer money," and Councilwoman Rikki Spector's reference to the camp as "toxic," made this proud resident of Baltimore feel shame that publicly elected officials would so openly demonstrate their contempt and lack of compassion for our most vulnerable citizens.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
In July, Perry Black started waiting in line every day under the Interstate 83 overpass with hundreds of other homeless people, leaning on crutches after losing three of his toes to diabetes. Last month, Black finally got a bed at the Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Housing Resource Center. When Catholic Charities took over the shelter over the summer, it set up a new system. Beds had been assigned on a first-come, first-served basis, so the homeless showed up daily, hours in advance.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
You can see why a state might require minors to have a parent's OK before they receive medical care. But Maryland law has made life especially difficult for homeless teenagers who have no adults watching out for them. It's the sort of problem that drives Lisa Stambolis crazy. As director of pediatric and adolescent health at Health Care for the Homeless in Baltimore, she organized people — including homeless teens — to press for change. It worked. A new law offering more leeway for minors' medical treatment goes into effect Oct. 1. In July, Stambolis was honored for her efforts and named a White House "Champion of Change," one of 13 selected for their efforts on behalf of homeless youth.
NEWS
By a Sun reporter, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Jeff Singer, the longtime president and chief executive officer of Health Care for the Homeless, announced his retirement Thursday, and the organization said it was immediately launching a search committee to identify a successor. Singer's 40-year career advocating for homeless people and families included 13 years at the helm of Health Care for the Homeless, which he joined in 1987. During his tenure, the group tripled the size of a Baltimore-based clinic and state headquarters and launched new dental and pediatric programs, and he oversaw a budget that quadrupled from $3.2 million in 1998 to $13.5 million this year.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
A plan to open an Edgemere residential program for homeless women is stirring concern among some residents in southeastern Baltimore County, highlighting a struggle that advocates for the homeless say they face in finding space for hundreds of people in need. Catholic Charities wants to open a facility called Hosanna House for 14 women, age 50 and older, at a former assisted-living facility and convent next to St. Luke's Roman Catholic Church. A county administrative law judge approved that plan earlier this year, but the North Point Peninsula Council and some residents filed an appeal.
NEWS
November 20, 2006
The days and nights are colder, and makeshift tents have already sprung up in some areas of the city. It's that time of year when the homeless are more visible - and more vulnerable. In addition to providing more warm places for those without homes to spend the night this winter, the city is putting together a 10-year plan to end persistent homelessness. It's a worthy endeavor, but only if it leads to tangible results. The fact that incoming Mayor Sheila Dixon has identified helping the homeless as one of her top priorities is a promising start.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
The concern of federal and local officials for homeless immigrant youth is touching ( "Rawlings-Blake voices concern over immigrant shelter," June 10). Thank goodness their opposition to this shelter isn't based on the ethnicity of these children, as might be the case in less enlightened environs. With the leadership of these officials, however, and with the support of many individuals and institutions in the Baltimore area, we can open our hearts and doors to these homeless children.
NEWS
June 14, 2014
I was saddened but not surprised to read of the proposal to house immigrant children in the old Social Security office building downtown ( "Feds scrap plan for immigrant shelter at Metro West," June 11). Where were such feelings of humanity and charity, where were such acts of compassion or proposals on the table, after the ruthless bulldozing of an entire homeless community under the Jones Falls in 2013 - an act that is set to be repeated? We should first and foremost be caring for our own legal Maryland citizens.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 14, 2014
Nobody asked me, but ... it's hard to believe that Dallas Dance, the Baltimore County school superintendent, could take a consulting job with a company that does business with the school system he runs and not see that as a problem. He says he "didn't recognize" a conflict of interest at the time. Here's what I'd write on his report card: "Dallas needs to work on making better choices. I suggest a summer camp for the ethically challenged. " Instead of just closing down another encampment of homeless people, maybe Baltimore officials can find a place for them and their tents, a small campground with running water, for the toughest cases - people who, for various reasons, do not fit into any of the city's current programs to reduce homelessness.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
We are looking to open vacant government buildings to shelter illegal immigrants but we won't open them up for our own homeless citizens ( "Immigrant children's center eyed for city ," June 10). Am I missing something here? Wayne Kirschnick, Annapolis Junction - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Standing outside his tent pitched on the sidewalk by a defunct downtown diner, Jimmy Stewart III wondered aloud where he'll sleep after city officials force him to leave Friday morning. The city is set to remove Stewart, 54, and a couple dozen other homeless people from their temporary homes on soggy mattresses along the Fallsway at makeshift campsites between parking spaces under the Jones Falls Expressway and inside tents huddled against the closed Hollywood Diner. It will be the fifth time in four years the city has forced him to move, Stewart said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The city and state are putting up a $450,000 black steel fence around the downtown War Memorial to stop homeless men and women - some of whom are veterans - from sleeping on the steps under the Greek-inspired columns of the landmark building across from City Hall. Activists who work with the homeless say the new fence, to be complete by mid-June, is a "disappointing" reminder of the ways government has failed to serve vulnerable people. But stewards of the historic structure say the barrier is needed to protect the War Memorial from trespassing and the occasional campfire.
NEWS
January 31, 1992
Sign of the times: A former Equitable Trust branch at 111 Park Avenue, originally built as the terminal of the old Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis Railroad, is being converted into a clearinghouse for services for the homeless.When the $1.3 million transformation is completed this spring, the homeless will be able to obtain an array of emergency services ranging from legal aid to psychological counseling at the centrally located site. Meanwhile, the Salvation Army is in the process of renovating its Booth House, at 1114 North Calvert Street, into a 30-day emergency residence for women and children forced out of their homes by fire or other circumstances.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Rita R. Martin, a counselor of homeless women at a Better Waverly residence, died of complications from multiple myeloma and infection Monday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Lochearn resident was 69. Born Rita Reynolds in San Diego, she earned a bachelor's degree in sociology and French at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Mo. While a senior, she met her future husband, Larry L. Martin, a college professor. "I was on a one-year assignment to the school, and we were introduced through a family there," said Dr. Martin.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Anne Arundel County police have charged a homeless man with killing another homeless man in Glen Burnie Tuesday night. Police were called to a homeless camp near the 7400 block of Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard at 7:39 p.m. on Tuesday, where it was reported that two men had been fighting. One of the men, 46-year-old Keith Lee Boggs was taken to Baltimore Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie, where he later died. Police learned that Boggs and another man, 44-year-old Eugene Wright had gotten into a fight, with Wright using a stick to hit Boggs.
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