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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2007
MINNEAPOLIS -- When Orioles management considers last night's season-opening lineup at the Metrodome, there's a sense of accomplishment that three of their key starters -- pitcher Erik Bedard, second baseman Brian Roberts and right fielder Nick Markakis -- are homegrown. By looking across the field at the Minnesota Twins, though, there's also the acknowledgment that the Orioles have plenty of development work to do if they want to be consistently competitive. That's what happens when you start a season against the Twins, an organization that is continually thick with prospects and almost devoid of multi-year free agents.
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September 22, 2012
Watermelons and tomatoes from Deep Run Farms, apples from Baugher's Orchard and potatoes from Wike Farm — all were served up this past week in Carroll County Public Schools as part of the celebration of Maryland Homegrown School Lunch Week. The statewide focus, which ran Sept. 17-21, called upon school systems to feature locally grown produce in their school lunch menus. Signage was created to accompany the products when possible, identifying for students the farms where the food was purchased.
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NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
When did Baltimore become a junked car, sold off for parts? I was still trying to make sense of Constellation Energy, about to be spirited away by a Midwesterner who was going to take our last Fortune 500 company from us, but at the last minute running into the arms of les francais and the chance to stay ici. Then, just as that whirlwind was settling down, we learned that Harborplace - Harborplace! Centerpiece of the Baltimore Renaissance! Engine of its waterfront revival! - had been put up for sale by its cash-poor, bankruptcy-threatened landlord.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 30, 2012
Here's an assumption any post-9/11American might make: Someone in a dark room full of computers and video monitors deep inside one of our snoopy federal law enforcement agencies is tracking the purchases of large caches of weapons and ammunition by anyone at any time anywhere in the country, including Anne Arundel County. Isn't that the sort of thing we've been paying for with our federal taxes over the last decade? People who buy explosives for bombs or enough weapons to outfit a small army - they're monitored by someone deep inside the Department of Homeland Security and our vast array of federal agencies, right?
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 10, 2006
Two losing baseball teams offered differing worldviews last week. Responding to his increasingly mutinous fans, David Glass, owner of the lamentable Kansas City Royals, said his organization would "change everything we can" and not sit still and do whatever is necessary to improve, blah, blah. Stan Kasten, new president of the Washington Nationals, said his downtrodden organization would "build through player development." Give me the Nationals' future any day. Both teams are in for at least several more years of losing, if not more, but boardroom-style bluster from ownership isn't worth the air it takes up. There's only one way to escape a long losing cycle in the major leagues, and that's to hunker down, take the heat in the short run and grow your own talent.
NEWS
March 16, 2010
Kudos to The Baltimore Sun for featuring the Morgan State's "homegrown" Baltimore talent ("Homegrown," March 16). Also, congrats to Todd Bozeman and his Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference championship team on its second straight appearance in the NCAA tournament. As a lifelong Baltimorean and Morgan alum, I am very proud of my alma mater and the wonderful education I received during there. Go Morgan, Beat WVU! Ron Owens, Baltimore The writer graudated from Morgan State University in 1961.
NEWS
January 24, 2007
Eleven homegrown musical groups took to the stage at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts on Saturday to compete in the Anne Arundel County High School Battle of the Bands. The rock show was a chance for local teens to show their musical talents and vie for awards, including Best Band, Best Stage Presence and Best Song.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
When "The Big Show," Bradshaw Littlejohn, departed after the 2004 season, the stage was set for a homegrown quarterback to become the marquee player in the Morgan State offense. And Byron Selby's opening act did not disappoint. As a first-year starter, the former Dunbar standout played to good reviews, pacing the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference with 2,023 passing yards and accounting for 18 touchdowns as a thrower or a runner. Morgan opener Sept. 2, @Towson, 6 p.m
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune | February 7, 2007
The increasing sophistication of American palates might partly explain the emergence of boxed mixes of white cheddar and macaroni. Or maybe it's that grown-ups reared on the orange stuff are upgrading. We found seven mixes in supermarkets; most were organic. Our six tasters sought authentic cheese flavor, with enough cheese to coat the pasta. We used whole milk to make each mix, and followed the box's directions for each sauce. However, we cooked all the pastas to an al dente texture. Our favorite was Safeway's O Organics.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | March 3, 1996
A roundup of new products and servicesA Can-do CompanyWho could coordinate the delivery of a bottle of Dom Perignon from Baltimore to a lord in Britain, locate a new pair of navy pumps before stores open (for a busy executive) and find a Santa Claus in 15 minutes to replace one who didn't show at a holiday party? Charm City Concierge says it can and has. Among the more than 100 services the local firm provides are gift buying and wrapping, catering, chauffeuring, and picking up and delivering dry cleaning.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
A Woodlawn man watches online videos of Osama bin Laden, posts about jihad on his Facebook page, and — according to federal prosecutors — agrees to a plot to detonate a bomb at a military recruiting center in Catonsville. An Ellicott City teen is accused of using the Internet to solicit volunteers and money for a jihadist war in South Asia and Europe. A former Army private from Laurel comes across an Islamic website, becomes a Muslim and makes plans to join a State Department-designated terrorist group in Somalia so he can live under Sharia law. That soldier, Craig Benedict Baxam, is the most recent Marylander accused of finding his way to Islamic extremism online.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011
It all started in a freezing cold warehouse in early January. Three old friends, all with different music backgrounds, got together for their first band practice. They didn't know what genre they were going for other than surf rock, but before the first hour was up they had their first song written. By the end of the practice, they had two. Since then, the sound of Drunk Monk has become something else entirely. “To me, it's a kind of psychedelic surf doom jazz,” says Jacob Honaker, 27, the band's guitarist.
NEWS
Jay Hancock | September 5, 2011
Last week the Brookings Institution updated its report on state job gaps — the discouraging difference between pre-recession employment and the number of jobs needed not only to attain pre-slump levels but to employ people who have entered the work force since the recession began in late 2007. Maryland did not fare well. While statewide employment is down 96,000 jobs from the peak, the job gap — what the economy needs to get back to normal — is 237,000 jobs, according to Brookings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Maryland Homegrown School Lunch Week is Sept. 12-16. A kickoff celebration for the fourth annual is being held on Friday, Sept. 9 at the Benjamin Banneker Elementary School in St. Mary's County, from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The program is designed to help educate students about where their food comes from, how it is produced, and the benefits of a healthy diet as well as to expand markets for Maryland farmers. There's more information here . The video describes a successful farm-to-school program in Harford County.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 9, 2011
It's nice — but rare — when shares of both companies rise on the announcement of a corporate takeover. Last month, DSM NV said it would buy Columbia-based Martek Biosciences for $1.1 billion in cash. Not only did Martek stock pop by more than 30 percent, reflecting the premium that Netherlands-based DSM agreed to pay over the shares' pre-announcement price; DSM rose by 4 percent, suggesting that its shareholders see the deal as sensible business and not a quixotic power grab by DSM boss Feike Sijbesma.
SPORTS
By Bill Shaikin, Tribune Newspapers | November 2, 2010
Brian Wilson attracted a crowd of reporters; so did Buster Posey and Tim Lincecum. The president of the San Francisco Giants did a round of interviews, and so did the owner, the former owner, former players, even the clubhouse manager. As the celebration raged in the San Francisco clubhouse late Monday night, all those interviews giddily interrupted by streams of champagne and beer, Dick Tidrow stood in an adjacent hallway, cameras and reporters rushing past him. There were plenty of romantic tales to be told about the first World Series championship in San Francisco history.
NEWS
By HAVILAND SMITH | August 18, 2006
Enormous pressure has been placed on al-Qaida since the fall of 2001. Our Afghan invasion cost it heavily, but more important, through our relationships with cooperative foreign intelligence services, we have been able to put al-Qaida under relentless pressure. Many of its top people have been killed or captured. Its communications and finances have been identified, monitored and disrupted, and its target countries have greatly increased their terrorist countermeasures. All of these things have weakened the terrorists and strengthened us and our friends.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 1997
Ah, August. The grass has nearly ceased growing due to our persistent drought, many annuals seem in suspended animation and most of the perennials have been cut back, staked or abandoned. The garden seems to hold few mysteries this time of year, and we are apt to pass over many plants daily, intent only on succoring them through the heat and into September.Yet there are still some plants that can surprise and even delight.For example, the herb of love.Did you know there may be an aphrodisiac right outside in your garden?
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Jerry Hauburger thought the opportunity would have come sooner, certainly by last season, when the logjam at Navy's deepest position on defense had started to clear. His coaches figured the same thing because Hauburger was bigger and faster than just about any outside linebacker the team had. Then again, maybe it was meant for Navy's only player from Baltimore to start for the first time in his hometown. Hauburger's road to M&T Bank Stadium for Monday's season opener against Maryland was, by his own acknowledgment, a struggle, with enough delays and detours to induce those with a little less fortitude to simply give up. But that is not who Hauburger is. "He's always broken down barriers," said Mark Mesaros, who coached Hauburger at Eastern Tech in Essex.
NEWS
July 10, 2010
The Gulf of Mexico oil leak gets nastier by the day. MARC trains have shown a tendency to either miss their stations or to stop in the middle of nowhere. The Orioles are mired in the cellar of the American League East. Yet this summer all is right with my world. I say this because, a few days ago, I harvested my first homegrown tomatoes. They were not very big, a handful of cherry tomatoes, Sun Gold and White Currant. But they were a harbinger of good times. Tomato plants are like rabbits; once they start producing, they have a hard time stopping.
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