Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHomefront
IN THE NEWS

Homefront

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By The Washington Post | December 18, 2009
JENNIFER JONES, 90 Actress won Oscar for 'Song of Bernadette' Jennifer Jones, an actress who won an Academy Award for playing a saint in "The Song of Bernadette" and became a popular sinner in Hollywood melodramas including "Duel in the Sun" and "Love is a Many-Splendored Thing," died Thursday at her home in Malibu, Calif. By most accounts, Ms. Jones' career faltered under the guidance of producer David O. Selznick, her second husband and one of the most powerful moguls in Hollywood.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 21, 1999
March is National Women's History Month, which honors the contributions of women throughout American history.Here are some reading suggestions for you and your child.Books with a twist"Tatterhood and Other Tales," edited by Ethel J. Phelps"Sammy Keyes and the Sisters of Mercy," by Wendelin Van Draanen"Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella," by Daniel San SouciGirl-powered books"Matilda," by Roald Dahl"Harriet the Spy," by Louise Fitzhugh"Mrs. Piggle Wiggle," by Betty MacDonald"The Great Gilly Hopkins," by Katherine Paterson"Sadako and the Thou- sand Paper Cranes," by Eleanor Coerr"The Courage of Sarah Noble," by Alice Dalgliesh"Shabanu: Daughter of the Wind," by Suzanne Fisher StaplesFiction"Her Stories: African American Folktales, Fairytales, and True Tales," told by Virginia Hamilton"Seven Brave Women," by Betsy Hearne"Bloomers!"
NEWS
By COMPILED FROM THE STAFF OF THE HARFORD COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY | December 7, 2008
The entrance of the United States into World War II was not unexpected. But the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was stunning news. It was late afternoon on that Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, via radio when people in Harford County first heard about the deadly attack in Hawaii. There were men from Harford County stationed there at the time, and the hours and days were long indeed until those loved ones were reported alive and well. Everyone recalls exactly what he or she was doing that afternoon.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | October 22, 1993
While staying in TV character seems to be the thing this season, other actors have made role reversals, at least in their on-screen careers. Maybe they all had midlife crises at the same time:* Most downwardly mobile: Peter Onorati, who was both sweet and sexy as a divorce lawyer on "Civil Wars," now is a laid-off aerospace worker in "Joe's Life." Stuck at home doing the Mr. Mom thing, he seemed much happier when his collar was white rather than blue."Joe's Life" is this season's refuge for the suddenly downscale: Mimi Kennedy, the snooty wife of the rich manufacturer in "Homefront," is on board as a waitress.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 15, 1991
Picture Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in black tie and gossamer gown gliding across the silver screen at the height of the Depression.Or think back to 1968. American cities were engulfed in race riots, and the only depiction of black life on TV was the middle-class predictability of "Julia." Body bags were arriving from Vietnam, and "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C." was TV's prime-time picture of military life.Escapism. Sugar-coated versions of reality. Old, familiar faces and old, familiar formulas.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
The latest class of police trainees marched to the podium to accept law enforcement certificates in gleaming black shoes and brass buttons that matched their smiles. The graduates yelled their names proudly during a special roll call and chanted at the end of the ceremony with vigor. But the name of one member of the class wasn't called. That trainee was seriously injured during a training exercise, adding a somber tone to the Baltimore Police Academy graduation Friday. "It made it real for them," said Alan Bush, cousin of police graduate Jose Bruno, who attended the graduation.
FEATURES
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2002
President Bush rallies the troops. NATO stands tall alongside America. New York's bravest toil, undaunted. News headlines? No. Trading cards in foil-wrapped packs. Rushed to press by the baseball card giant Topps Co., the 90-card series depicts America's might and resolve. The good guys are glossy, in full-color Associated Press and Defense Department photos with red, white and blue borders. Osama bin Laden's card, though, looks like a miniature wanted poster, in stark black and white.
FEATURES
By Michale Hill | October 9, 1991
Though the spoils of the battleground grow smaller and smaller each season, there are still millions of dollars at stake as the networks go into the fall season girded for their annual battle.This fight is won with fortresses, constructed block by half-hour block. You take a "Murphy Brown," put a "Designing Women" behind it, move an "Evening Shade" to the top of the night, bolster a "Major Dad" in the middle, finish up with the surprise weapon of "Northern Exposure," and you have a night that can stand dominant, probably for years to come.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.