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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | June 2, 1993
NEW YORK -- Promising more than "baubles, bangles and beads," R.H. Macy & Co. said yesterday that it was entering the booming -- but unproven -- market of home shopping by launching its own 24-hour television channel.Backed by network and cable television veterans, including Don Hewitt, the executive producer of "60 Minutes," and Charles Dolan, chairman of Cablevision Systems Corp., "TV Macy's" is expected to reach 15 million to 20 million viewers when it starts airing next year, said Macy's chairman, Myron E. Ullman III."
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
Neighborhood: Lauraville Location: Northeast Baltimore Average sales price: $184,000 (January through June) Notable features: Single-family homes - some quite large - on streets with a quiet, off-the-beaten-track atmosphere. Yet the eastern boundary is Harford Road, a major artery. Businesses in the area include a Safeway grocery store and Main Street-style, independently owned shops. Lauraville was mostly built in the 1910s and '20s, but it became a village with a post office just after the Civil War, according to the Lauraville Improvement Association.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 22, 1993
NEW YORK -- QVC Network Inc. intends to put its pending merger with Home Shopping Network Inc. on the back burner as it pursues its bid for Paramount Communications Inc., several people close to QVC said yesterday.Such a move would leave Barry Diller, QVC's chairman, free to devote all his energies and financial resources to prying Paramount away from its proposed merger partner, Viacom Inc.Wall Street seems to think that Viacom Chairman Sumner M. Redstone, and maybe others, will not easily let Mr. Diller have the last word.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
Neighborhood:: Lauraville Location:: Northeast Baltimore Average sales price:: $184,000 (January through June) Notable features:: Single-family homes - some quite large - on streets with a quiet, off-the-beaten-track atmosphere. Yet the eastern boundary is Harford Road, a major artery. Businesses in the area include a Safeway grocery store and Main Street-style, independently owned shops. Lauraville was mostly built in the 1910s and '20s, but it became a village with a post office just after the Civil War, according to the Lauraville Improvement Association.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | August 26, 1993
Hold the remote. There's new excitement on the TV home shopping networks. We're talking glamour, fashion and star quality. We're talking designers with allure.Fashion snobs who have looked down on shopping networks as 24-hour home companions for idle women with couch-potato figures are beginning to take notice.The fledgling industry, which started out with endless hours of disembodied hands waggling sparkle rings, has discovered the appeal of the total image.The astounding success of the first designers to make the TV plunge has a raft of celebrities ready to dive in. Even Roseanne Barr is rumored to be negotiating a spot to sell plus-size fashions.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1994
MTV to test home shoppingMTV Networks said yesterday that it will run a test of home shopping programs on its TV cable networks -- MTV, VH-1 and Nick at Nite.After this spring's test, MTV said, it will consider launching a stand-alone shopping channel.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1994
A local shop-at-home program being aired by Luskin's Inc. on WBFF Channel 45 could represent the newest expansion in a concept that has primarily remained a national phenomenon.Luskin's, an electronics and appliance chain based in Columbia, has teamed up with WBFF, a Fox network affiliate, to produce what local advertising executives believe is Baltimore's first locally made shop-at-home program.Long known for its frantic 30-second commercials proclaiming Jack Luskin as "the cheapest guy in town," the regional chain is gingerly testing the concept with an hour-long program that has been airing once a week on Channel 45."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | August 26, 1993
The 24-hour marathon Fashion Day at QVC yesterday proves the home shopping network is looking to add zip to its motto of "Quality, Value, Convenience."Ever since media mogul Barry Diller came on board early this year, the fashion frisson has been felt up and down America's call-in shopping lines.Now that QVC has made a bid to take over the Home Shopping Channel, the Diller influence on the way 60 million Americans shop at home will be complete.He has brought star-quality friends to the air and into the fold, making new believers out of fashion establishment leaders who, early on, couldn't have been bothered with the TV showcase for cutlery and cubic zirconia.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1993
TCQVC gears for new Paramount bidHome shopping powerhouse QVC Network Inc. is reshaping its alliances with other companies in preparation for a new bid to win entertainment conglomerate Paramount Communications Inc., analysts said yesterday.Emphasizing its focus on the Paramount bid, QVC ended long-running merger talks with Home Shopping Network Inc. yesterday. The company also may be getting closer to bringing regional telephone company BellSouth Corp. into its bidding group, according to published reports.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1995
Sale of QVC approved by FTCTwo of the nation's largest cable companies received permission from federal regulators yesterday to acquire home shopping channel operator QVC Inc. for $1.42 billion.The Federal Trade Commission voted 4-0 to close an investigation into the acquisition by the nation's No. 1 cable company, Tele-Communications Inc., and Comcast Corp., which is No. 4.The FTC's investigation of the deal was prompted by concerns that it would violate antitrust laws. TCI controls QVC's closest competitor, Home Shopping Network Inc. FTC commissioners approved the deal over staff objections.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2008
Developer Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse hopes to transform 17 acres in South Baltimore's Port Covington into a community that could include homes, shops and offices, along with a promenade and even a trolley. Struever Bros., working with the owner of the adjacent Tidewater Yacht Service Center, envisions a 2 million-square-foot development with 2,010 housing units, some of which could be built on reconstructed piers. Early concept plans, presented yesterday to the city's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel, shows three residential towers, one as tall as 38 stories, as well as smaller housing units that wrap around parking garages.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | October 17, 2006
In the latest major real estate project sparked by the boom in Maryland's national security sector, state leaders announced yesterday a $150 million complex of homes, offices and shops and a hotel next to the Odenton MARC train station that would be the cornerstone of a regional town center. On 24 acres now owned by the state and Anne Arundel County, three developers would also build two public parking garages totaling 3,500 spaces to ease notorious crowding at the station. Another 1,245 outdoor parking spaces would be available at the proposed Odenton Town Square, which will include 70,000 square feet of retail space, the hotel of 90 to 120 rooms, 572 apartments and condominiums, 250 townhouses and five single-family homes.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
A 50-acre industrial swath of Middle River that could be transformed into a mix of housing, shops and offices centered on mass transit will be offered for sale in an online auction by the federal government next month. The site, near Martin State Airport at Eastern Boulevard and the soon-to-be-extended Route 43, contains a historic 1.9 million-square-foot plant where World War II bombers and seaplanes were manufactured. It is now owned and used for storage by the U.S. General Services Administration.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
Condos or apartments, a grocery store and neighborhood shops would be built on the site of a former junkyard in Brooklyn under a developer's proposal to transform 17 industrial acres in the South Baltimore neighborhood. Business Real Estate Partners LLC proposed the project in response to a request from Baltimore Development Corp., which is marketing the vacant, city-owned land along with a vacant parcel owned by the state. The developer, the only one to submit a plan for the site at Potee and Garrett streets, envisions a Brooklyn town center that could help build a neighborhood identity.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse Inc. was chosen yesterday to transform a former tobacco factory next to the Durham Bulls' baseball park in North Carolina into apartments, shops and offices, making Struever the second Baltimore-based developer in a week to get the nod for a mixed-used project adjacent to a stadium. Struever, known for recycling industrial sites to create homes, offices and shops, will redevelop five buildings across from the downtown Durham minor league ballpark of the Bulls, a farm team that came to fame in the 1987 movie Bull Durham.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2003
The owners of two large swaths of land in eastern Howard County have applied for rezoning that would set the stage for future development. Applications have been submitted that would allow shops, offices and homes on about 75 acres of the Curtis farm next to Route 100 in Ellicott City and about 200 acres in North Laurel owned by the Maryland & Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative Association. But owners of both properties say that development would occur years from now, if at all. Bob Curtis, 57, whose family has owned the farm since the late 1800s, said he'd rather plan a future for the property now. "We want to have a role in the crafting," he said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 5, 1994
NEW YORK -- QVC Inc. approved a $46-per-share takeover of fer yesterday from Tele-Communications Inc. and Comcast Corp. that values the home shopping channel at about $2.53 billion.After spending more than six hours yesterday analyzing and revising details of the deal, the QVC board accepted the all-cash offer for the 35 million shares not already held by Tele-Communications and Comcast. The companies had previously offered $44 a share. QVC has about 55 million shares outstanding.The takeover is expected to be completed within 30 days.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | April 1, 1993
Meet Jean Cave, shopper of a future that's already here.Each weekday, the Joppatowne woman gets up at 4 a.m., turns on the QVC cable shopping network and watches it as she gets ready to leave for work at 6:30 a.m. The first thing she does when she gets home is tune in QVC on her kitchen television. If something special is scheduled to come on QVC at 2 a.m., she'll set the alarm to get up and watch it. She's even been known to schedule her vacation time around QVC's programming.Mrs. Cave might be atypical, but she's hardly alone in her devotion to TV shopping.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2003
The owners of two large swaths of land in eastern Howard County have applied for rezoning that would set the stage for future development. Applications have been submitted that would allow shops, offices and homes on about 75 acres of the Curtis farm next to Route 100 in Ellicott City and about 200 acres in North Laurel owned by the Maryland & Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative Association. But owners of both properties say that development would occur years from now, if at all. Bob Curtis, 57, whose family has owned the farm since the late 1800s, said he'd rather plan a future for the property now. "We want to have a role in the crafting," he said.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 23, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The white-haired barber, elegant and still on the job, loses himself in long tales about his stint as hairdresser for Faisal II, Iraq's last king, nearly 60 years ago. Across the street, the owner of a beverage shop points to his father's solemn portrait on the wall. With obvious pride, the owner says his family has been selling grape juice on this spot since 1908. A few doors down, men of all ages sip hot tea from thimble-size glasses and smoke elaborate water pipes at the Cafe of Hassan, reported to be a 200-year-old meeting spot.
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