Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHome Secretary
IN THE NEWS

Home Secretary

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
David Blunkett, Britain's top law enforcement officer and a possible future prime minister, stood beside an ornate table during a welcoming ceremony in Baltimore's City Hall yesterday, ripping open the silver wrapping of the wrong present. His staff had intended for him to give the gift - a pewter mug - to Mayor Martin O'Malley, who had handed Blunkett a crystal dish moments earlier. But Blunkett, who is blind, turned the awkward moment to his advantage as he has throughout his career, rising from disability and poverty to become one of the most powerful and admired people in England.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alicia Lozano and Alicia Lozano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2007
LONDON -- At the end of a six-month trial, jurors were dismissed yesterday after failing to reach a verdict on the fates of two remaining defendants charged with attempting to blow up portions of London's public transit system in 2005. On Monday, four plotters were found guilty of conspiracy to commit murder. They will return to court today for sentencing. Their lawyers had contended that the devices they planted, which failed to explode, were meant to scare the public rather than cause physical damage.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 17, 2002
LONDON - Street crime has increased so sharply in this once-peaceful city that pedestrians are more likely to be mugged here than in New York, British officials say. The increased lawlessness has been particularly noticeable this year, with a spate of high-profile assaults, carjackings and killings making headlines. Last week's visit by Rudolph W. Giuliani, well known here for the tough line he took against crime as mayor of New York, focused the government's attention on the problem. At a flurry of meetings with the British home secretary, the mayor of London and the commissioner of the Metropolitan Police force, Giuliani described how as mayor he transformed New York from a city where people were afraid to walk the streets to a place where crime had fallen 52 percent by the time he left office in January.
NEWS
By VANORA MCWALTERS and VANORA MCWALTERS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 6, 2006
LONDON -- Reeling from his party's poor showing in local elections, British Prime Minister Tony Blair fired several senior ministers from his Cabinet yesterday in a sweeping reshuffle intended to reassert his authority and silence party members who want him to quit. But his most powerful colleague, rival and heir-apparent - Gordon Brown, the chancellor of the exchequer - distanced himself from the reshuffle, saying he had not been consulted. Brown also described the voting results as "a warning shot" that showed the Labor Party needed to be "renewed."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1999
LONDON -- The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that two 10-year-old boys who kidnapped and killed 2-year-old James Bulger in a Liverpool shopping center in 1993 had not received a fair trial in Britain.The judges said Jon Venables and Robert Thompson had been too young to take part effectively in a procedure meant for adults and that the home secretary at the time, Michael Howard, had erred in increasing their eight-year jail sentence to 15 years.The boys have served six years.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 15, 1991
LONDON -- The Birmingham Six, in jail for almost 17 years after being convicted of committing the Irish Republican Army's bloodiest attack in England, were freed yesterday after the Appeals Court quashed their convictions.The three appeal judges were told that the police had woven "an intricate web of deceit" to secure the original guilty verdicts and that forensic evidence produced at their trial was now considered flawed.Immediately after the verdict, Home Secretary Kenneth Baker announced in the House of Commons creation of a royal commission to undertake a two-year review of the entire English criminal justice system, including the "investigation of alleged miscarriages of justice once appeal rights have been exhausted."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 2001
LONDON - Less than nine years after they abducted and murdered a toddler in a crime that was among the more notorious in modern British history, 18-year- olds Robert Thompson and Jon Venables were ordered freed yesterday by Britain's Parole Board. The whereabouts of the teen-agers remained unknown, protected by a court order shielding their identities, and it was unclear whether they had already been released from juvenile detention. The teens, who were 10 when they murdered 2-year-old James Bulger, will be under official supervision for the rest of their lives.
NEWS
By VANORA MCWALTERS and VANORA MCWALTERS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 6, 2006
LONDON -- Reeling from his party's poor showing in local elections, British Prime Minister Tony Blair fired several senior ministers from his Cabinet yesterday in a sweeping reshuffle intended to reassert his authority and silence party members who want him to quit. But his most powerful colleague, rival and heir-apparent - Gordon Brown, the chancellor of the exchequer - distanced himself from the reshuffle, saying he had not been consulted. Brown also described the voting results as "a warning shot" that showed the Labor Party needed to be "renewed."
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2005
LONDON - Britain will deport any non-citizen who foments, justifies or glorifies terrorist violence, Home Secretary Charles Clarke said yesterday, unveiling toughened criteria for remaining in the country in response to the July attacks on the transit system. The pronouncement, aimed mainly at radical preachers, evoked criticism from civil liberties groups, who said that the new standards could infringe on Britain's culture of free speech and erode liberties. They also expressed concern that some Islamic dissidents would face torture if forced back to their home countries.
NEWS
By Alicia Lozano and Alicia Lozano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2007
LONDON -- At the end of a six-month trial, jurors were dismissed yesterday after failing to reach a verdict on the fates of two remaining defendants charged with attempting to blow up portions of London's public transit system in 2005. On Monday, four plotters were found guilty of conspiracy to commit murder. They will return to court today for sentencing. Their lawyers had contended that the devices they planted, which failed to explode, were meant to scare the public rather than cause physical damage.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2005
LONDON - Britain will deport any non-citizen who foments, justifies or glorifies terrorist violence, Home Secretary Charles Clarke said yesterday, unveiling toughened criteria for remaining in the country in response to the July attacks on the transit system. The pronouncement, aimed mainly at radical preachers, evoked criticism from civil liberties groups, who said that the new standards could infringe on Britain's culture of free speech and erode liberties. They also expressed concern that some Islamic dissidents would face torture if forced back to their home countries.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 11, 2004
LONDON - The raids on suspected al-Qaida members here last week were dramatic: Anti-terrorism officers surrounded cars on public streets, high-powered weapons drawn. Officers yanked suspects out of the vehicles while bystanders ran into their houses or dropped to the ground for cover. After the raids, which netted 13 people suspected of involvement in terrorist acts, London police said the arrests were part of a "pre-planned, ongoing, intelligence-led operation." What British officials did not say at the time is that they had hoped the operation would continue, so that other suspected terrorists could be identified and eventually arrested.
NEWS
By Sebastian Rotella and Janet Stobart and Sebastian Rotella and Janet Stobart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 28, 2003
LONDON - British police arrested a suspected al-Qaida operative and searched his home and a mosque for explosives yesterday in raids that were carried out as counterterrorism forces in much of Europe were on heightened alert. Britain's top law enforcement official described the arrest of the 24-year-old Briton of Pakistani descent in the western city of Gloucester as "significant." Home Secretary David Blunkett indicated that intelligence agents might have broken up a terrorist plot in Britain a week after suicide bombings of British targets in Turkey.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
David Blunkett, Britain's top law enforcement officer and a possible future prime minister, stood beside an ornate table during a welcoming ceremony in Baltimore's City Hall yesterday, ripping open the silver wrapping of the wrong present. His staff had intended for him to give the gift - a pewter mug - to Mayor Martin O'Malley, who had handed Blunkett a crystal dish moments earlier. But Blunkett, who is blind, turned the awkward moment to his advantage as he has throughout his career, rising from disability and poverty to become one of the most powerful and admired people in England.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 17, 2002
LONDON - Street crime has increased so sharply in this once-peaceful city that pedestrians are more likely to be mugged here than in New York, British officials say. The increased lawlessness has been particularly noticeable this year, with a spate of high-profile assaults, carjackings and killings making headlines. Last week's visit by Rudolph W. Giuliani, well known here for the tough line he took against crime as mayor of New York, focused the government's attention on the problem. At a flurry of meetings with the British home secretary, the mayor of London and the commissioner of the Metropolitan Police force, Giuliani described how as mayor he transformed New York from a city where people were afraid to walk the streets to a place where crime had fallen 52 percent by the time he left office in January.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 2001
LONDON - Less than nine years after they abducted and murdered a toddler in a crime that was among the more notorious in modern British history, 18-year- olds Robert Thompson and Jon Venables were ordered freed yesterday by Britain's Parole Board. The whereabouts of the teen-agers remained unknown, protected by a court order shielding their identities, and it was unclear whether they had already been released from juvenile detention. The teens, who were 10 when they murdered 2-year-old James Bulger, will be under official supervision for the rest of their lives.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 11, 2004
LONDON - The raids on suspected al-Qaida members here last week were dramatic: Anti-terrorism officers surrounded cars on public streets, high-powered weapons drawn. Officers yanked suspects out of the vehicles while bystanders ran into their houses or dropped to the ground for cover. After the raids, which netted 13 people suspected of involvement in terrorist acts, London police said the arrests were part of a "pre-planned, ongoing, intelligence-led operation." What British officials did not say at the time is that they had hoped the operation would continue, so that other suspected terrorists could be identified and eventually arrested.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 3, 1998
LONDON -- For nearly two weeks, this was Britain's great parlor game: identify the unnamed high-ranking Cabinet minister whose teen-age son was questioned by police about the alleged sale of $17 worth of marijuana to a tabloid newspaper reporter.Well, yesterday, the name came out in the media, and it was none other than the Labor government's top law-and-order man, Home Secretary Jack Straw.But by the time the name was published there seemed to be more farce than scandal.Newspapers in Scotland and Ireland -- not bound by English courts -- published Straw's name, which had been been circulating on the Internet for days, anyway.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 3, 2000
LONDON -- Former Chilean dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet headed home yesterday a free but broken man after British Home Secretary Jack Straw blocked his extradition and ended a contentious, nearly l7-month saga that overturned legal conventions, hampered diplomacy and divided world opinion. Pinochet, 84, ailing after suffering several strokes last fall, took off in a medically equipped Chilean plane from a British air force base hours after Straw said the former dictator was medically unfit to stand trial on human rights charges.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 11, 2000
LONDON -- There may be less dangerous ways to get from Afghanistan to Britain than to ride on a hijacked Afghan jet and sit on an airport tarmac for more than 76 hours. But now that they're here, 74 ex-hostages from the Afghan airliner hijacked to England this week don't want to go home. The hijack standoff at Stansted airport outside London ended peacefully with the release of all passengers early yesterday. Of the 150 people who left the plane, 21 are under arrest and 74 want to stay here, turning the hijack drama into a refugee "crisis."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.