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By John Culleton | March 3, 2012
With respect to the state legislature, the phrase "Carroll County Delegation" is about to become inaccurate. The statewide redistricting process, particularly regarding the House of Delegates, has done us in. Of the eight delegates to be elected to our county's delegation in 2014, only three are guaranteed to be Carroll County residents. Because of the way the districts will be redrawn, three will be from a district that is vastly dominated by Frederick County and two will be from a Howard County district that has just a small section of Carroll in it. But because those districts will have a toe in Carroll, all their delegates will be members of the Carroll County Delegation — and will have a say in our affairs.
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FEATURES
October 9, 2013
OFFICIAL RULES 1. NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY. The Historic Homes Contest (the "Contest") is sponsored by The Baltimore Sun Company, LLC ("Baltimore Sun"), Bella Kitchen and Bath and Hotel Monaco Baltimore. Contest is offered only in the counties in Harford, Howard, Baltimore, Carroll, Anne Arundel Counties & Baltimore City, Maryland (the "Contest Area") and is subject to all federal, state and local laws. Contest begins on October 6, 2013. Entry deadline has been extended to Nov. 8, 2013 at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time ("ET")
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NEWS
By Donna Boller | August 19, 1992
THE last county in the Baltimore metropolitan region still operating under a county commissioner form of government will have a chance this fall to trade the old vehicle for a newer model with more power under the hood.Carroll County voters are expected to decide Nov. 3 whether they want to adopt a county charter, a home-rule document that would replace the three part-time commissioners with a County Council and full-time administrator. The move also would shift lawmaking power from the General Assembly to the new council.
EXPLORE
By John Culleton | August 18, 2012
I know I've said it before, but it's more true than ever: It's time to revisit the question of Code Home Rule for Carroll County. The Board of County Commissioners can propose such a change, then the voters can approve it in the next general election. Easy as pie. What would this mean? Well, for one thing, all those Carroll County local bills in the State Legislature would no longer have to be submitted. Instead, the commissioners could enact or repeal any bill which applied only to Carroll County.
NEWS
October 1, 2006
The county commissioners are sponsoring five public informational workshops about Code Home Rule. In August, the commissioners adopted a resolution to place on the Nov. 7 ballot a public referendum to vote for or against transforming Carroll County into a code form of home rule government. The workshops will be held before the general election to give residents information on this form of government. Government consultant Victor K. Tervala of the Institute of Governmental Service at the University of Maryland, College Park, will present an overview of Code Home Rule and answer questions.
NEWS
September 14, 1992
This Nov. 3, Carroll County voters have a chance to make fundamental change for the better in their form of government. The county's charter board has fashioned a document that provides for a political structure that is more responsive and accountable than the current commission form.At present, there are no clear lines of responsibility for dealing with local issues. The commissioners derive their authority from the state constitution. A number of important county functions -- including the ability to float bonds -- are controlled by the General Assembly.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
The Carroll County commissioners launched an effort yesterday to place on the November ballot a code home rule referendum that, if approved by voters, would grant the board more authority to enact local laws and bonds without approval from the General Assembly. The code home rule movement came one day after state legislators failed, for the second time, to approve a bill that would have drawn districts from which to elect five commissioners in the fall election. The General Assembly also adjourned in April without approving a redistricting map. The Carroll commissioners said yesterday that they will go ahead with countywide information sessions and public hearings on code home rule.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | March 16, 1995
When I was a kid, the Riggs Plaza Shopping Center in Northeast Washington, D.C. seemed a thriving place. But that was almost 30 years ago.Today, Riggs Plaza resembles a vast, concrete wasteland. Most of the stores are boarded up. Trash blows across the parking lot like desert tumbleweeds. The mall's decline offers a fitting metaphor for my troubled hometown.Washington faces a budget shortfall of $722 million. Mayor Marion Barry has threatened to cut the city's work force by 5,000 people. Those layoffs would follow layoffs and reductions in force by both the federal and district governments since the mid-1980s.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Anne Haddad and Kerry O'Rourke and Anne Haddad,Staff Writers | November 4, 1992
Voters in Carroll County have rejected home rule for the third time in 30 years.And a challenger has defeated the incumbent president of the county school board.Unofficial results from all 35 of Carroll's precincts showed a proposal for charter government losing by 62 percent to 38 percent.In the race for a seat on the Carroll County Board of Education, challenger C. Scott Stone defeated incumbent Cheryl A. McFalls, 56 percent to 44 percent.Results of the election were delayed last night after an electrical transformer failed in Westminster, blacking out the County Office Building and downing its vote-counting computers.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
After bitter clashes with the county's General Assembly delegation on taxes and redistricting this spring, Carroll County's three commissioners voted yesterday to place on the November ballot a measure that would give local officials more power. If voters approve, Carroll will become the state's seventh code home rule county. Under code home rule, the commissioner format would be retained but the commissioners would not need General Assembly approval to enact most local laws, as they do now. That is still a step short of charter government, which involves an elected county executive and county council.
NEWS
By John Culleton | March 3, 2012
With respect to the state legislature, the phrase "Carroll County Delegation" is about to become inaccurate. The statewide redistricting process, particularly regarding the House of Delegates, has done us in. Of the eight delegates to be elected to our county's delegation in 2014, only three are guaranteed to be Carroll County residents. Because of the way the districts will be redrawn, three will be from a district that is vastly dominated by Frederick County and two will be from a Howard County district that has just a small section of Carroll in it. But because those districts will have a toe in Carroll, all their delegates will be members of the Carroll County Delegation — and will have a say in our affairs.
EXPLORE
November 8, 2011
It's nearly impossible to adequately put into perspective all of the contributions to Harford County made by Imogene B. Johnston, who died Oct. 26 at the age of 92. Mrs. Johnston was a major architect both of the county charter and the eventual transition to home rule government in Harford County in the period 1968-74, though undoubtedly she herself would have considered her contributions to be modest ones. In reality, she was the glue that held a lot of things together in those early days of a new government that was birthed with considerable pain and confusion.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
Baltimore, where thousands of buildings contain lead-based paint that can poison young children, has lost federal funding for abatement programs due to mismanagement of its most recent grant, officials said Monday. Department of Housing and Urban Development officials told The Baltimore Sun that the city health department failed to fix up enough homes under the latest $4 million grant, which expired in January, and as a result the city was deemed a "high-risk" grantee ineligible to receive more funds.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
The County Council appears set to approve a bill Monday night that would require sprinklers in every new, detached home built in Howard County starting Jan. 1. New townhouses in Howard have been required to have them since 1992. None of the five council members said they opposed the idea after a work session discussion this week, though western county Republican Greg Fox said he's considering an amendment that would phase in the change for rural homes without public water and sewer service because of the added expense of a storage tank and a pump.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
This year inexpensive, natural decorations are popular, as people turn to more traditional baubles to decorate their homes for Christmas. With boughs of holly, fresh fruit, fresh greens, pine cones, wired ribbon and brown paper bags, a family can decorate their entire home for little or no expense, said Patti Pearce, owner of Flowers by Design, a floral shop on Main Street in Bel Air. For years, Pearce has decorated homes and storefront windows in...
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | December 6, 2006
Anne Arundel County's lawsuit against a builder who constructed an island home in the Magothy River without permits will not be dropped, County Executive John R. Leopold said yesterday, despite a recent ruling by the Board of Appeals to allow the builder to keep his home. Leopold said the matter regarding Daryl C. Wagner "has been a black eye for the county. It's my intent to do everything in my power to ensure that this does not reoccur." Leopold's comments came a day after the seven-member appeals board granted retroactive variances, letting Wagner keep his glistening white home of more than 5,000 square feet on Little Island, near Pasadena.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
Eldersburg residents April Rose and Pat Perkins stand on opposite sides of the debate over bringing more local control to Carroll County. It's a divisive issue that could appear on the ballot in the November election. "I don't see the need to rush this," said Rose, 37, a real estate agent who has lived in the county since 1991. "I want those checks and balances to save me from paying more taxes." Perkins, 76, strongly disagrees. A county resident since 1960, she's tired of watching charter and home rule efforts fail here.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
Carroll County commissioners worried about hastily adopting a code home rule resolution when residents raised the issue last week, but Commissioner Dean L. Minnich said he hopes dialogue will continue on bringing the question to referendum for the November election. "I'm not closed to the idea yet of putting it on the ballot," he said. "I don't want to quash the discussion on this because I think it's useful." Seizing momentum from the General Assembly's failure to approve a commissioner redistricting map, Del. Susan W. Krebs, a Republican, and several Eldersburg residents urged the commissioners last week to push for more local control.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Arin Gencer and Laura McCandlish and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporters | November 8, 2006
Vying to retain seats on the three-member board, Carroll County Commissioners Julia Walsh Gouge and Dean L. Minnich held solid leads last night while a code home rule referendum that would have brought more local government control appeared headed toward defeat, according to election results. With more than 57 percent of Carroll's 99,000 registered voters casting ballots in yesterday's election, conservative Republican Michael D. Zimmer held a slight lead over Democrat Dennis E. Beard for the third seat on the Board of Commissioners.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | October 22, 2006
Tension between Carroll County's all-Republican delegation to Annapolis and the GOP commissioners first catalyzed over the issue of a transfer tax on home sales, Del. Tanya T. Shewell said recently from the GOP party headquarters in downtown Westminster. The commissioners, who have unsuccessfully lobbied for the tax measure since 2002, then clashed with the delegation during the legislative session early this year over which map to implement to elect five commissioners by district. In the House of Delegates races in Carroll this fall, Democrats are hoping to capitalize on this sometimes fractious relationship, describing themselves as the ideological equivalents of the moderate board of commissioners.
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