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Home Repairs

FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 21, 1997
IN THE FIGHT with your house, you win few rounds, you lose a few rounds, but you never stop repairing.I was reminded of this yesterday when the ice maker in the refrigerator decided to stop make ice cubes.The ice maker and I have gone around a few times before. Two years ago it suckered me into buying a replacement ice maker. When I got the new unit home and read the instructions telling me how install it, I discovered the old one wasn't broken, it had just tricked me.It was the old stuck-wire ruse.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 19, 1997
LIKE A LOT OF guys who spend time in basement workshops, I have been following the news stories of "the guys in space," the two Russians and one American who have been trying to fix the damaged Mir space station.According to news accounts, they have attempted to make repairs while "crawling around in the clammy darkness" using only flashlights for illumination. They have battled a faulty air-conditioning system. And when something has gone wrong -- for instance, when one of the Mir guys accidentally unplugged a cable that sent the space station tumbling -- they have been subjected to endless second-guessing.
BUSINESS
By Daniel B. Wroblewski | September 23, 1990
The Enterprise Foundation has gone upscale.The foundation, which helps low-income people reduce the cost of homebuilding and repair, is letting the middle class in on some of its tricks of the trade."
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 1998
A BOY SCOUT working to earn his Eagle award, Scouting's highest honor, led a group of volunteers in a home repair project near Manchester on Saturday.Jason Seabrease, 15, a member of Troop 380, enlisted fellow Scouts and parents to volunteer for the Christmas in April project at a home near Manchester. Jason, a sophomore at North Carroll High School, began preparing for the single day of work in July."Everybody in the troop, Scouts and parents, signed up. became house captain and went from there," Jason said.
NEWS
By William C. Ward and William C. Ward,Staff Writer | October 13, 1991
I was nine years old when I was introduced to the world of wall repairs. In a tantrum over an infringement of my civil rights (I was not allowed to watch television for more than 10 hours that day) I savagely kicked open the door to my bedroom and heard a sickening crack. The doorknob had stuck into the wall. As I gingerly pulled it away, a shower of white flecks tumbled out all over the floor.I was terrified. Not only had one of my civil rights been rescinded, but now I was going to experience capital punishment.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
The one-day blitz motto is a modest one for Christmas in April volunteers who launched the new chapter's first event yesterday.About 100 volunteers spent yesterday fixing up five homes belonging to people who are elderly, handicapped or otherwise unable to get the work done alone.But several of the volunteers plan to return this week to finish what couldn't be done by the time it started raining in the late afternoon.At many of the homes, the first step was clearing away accumulated garbage, crates, broken appliances and furniture and piles of wood, to make way for the construction improvements.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 9, 1996
A JOURNEY of a thousand miles begins with the first step, unless that step resembles the one sitting outside my back door. In that case, there is a strong chance that rather than landing 1,000 miles away, you will land on your backside. The step is loose. It rocks. It rolls. If you don't step on it as lightly as a cat, you can easily end up spread-eagle.I got a telephone call at work the other day telling me I should fix the step. The call came from one of my kids. It wasn't a suggestion.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 19, 1993
Since tomorrow is Father's Day, I'm sure a lot of folks are frantically trying to come up with home-repair type activities they can do with their Dads.Well, worry no more. Here in convenient list form are six activities that will please the old man.First is that ever-popular undertaking, Mapping Your Home's lTC Electric Circuits. This task doesn't merely allow every member of the family to participate, it requires it.It works like this: The Dad, armed with a pencil and paper, takes up his position at the circuit breaker box, also called the service panel.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
A Pasadena contractor accused of cheating homeowners out of more than $120,000 pleaded guilty yesterday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court to felony theft charges for taking money to build decks, piers and docks but doing little or no work. Donald E. Berry, 44, of the 8100 block of Bodkin Ave. is scheduled to be sentenced Sept. 28 by Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Joseph P. Manck. As part of a plea agreement, Berry pleaded guilty to 10 counts of felony theft and was given 30 days to pay more than $83,000 in restitution to 21 Anne Arundel County homeowners who fell prey to the home improvement scheme.
FEATURES
By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 9, 1994
Q: The windows in my older house need new putty. The old putty has deteriorated, and each window has many small panes of glass. How should I fix this?A: The most difficult part of the job will probably be the first step -- removing the old putty -- since the glass will crack unless great care is used. Also, if you plan to do the work yourself, you probably will have to do much of the work from a ladder, which also requires great care.An ordinary putty knife, used as a scraper, is often adequate for removing old putty, but my favorite tool is a combination tool sold at some paint stores and home centers.
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