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Home Repairs

FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 21, 1997
IN THE FIGHT with your house, you win few rounds, you lose a few rounds, but you never stop repairing.I was reminded of this yesterday when the ice maker in the refrigerator decided to stop make ice cubes.The ice maker and I have gone around a few times before. Two years ago it suckered me into buying a replacement ice maker. When I got the new unit home and read the instructions telling me how install it, I discovered the old one wasn't broken, it had just tricked me.It was the old stuck-wire ruse.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Marcia Myers contributed to this article | March 2, 1995
Pledging a thorough investigation into the troubled $25.6 million program to fix up homes for the poor, Baltimore City Council Vice President Vera P. Hall is calling local and federal housing officials, as well as lawyers and tenants, to a hearing next week.Mrs. Hall, who chairs the council's housing committee, said she is "trying to cover the waterfront" in soliciting testimony from people involved in the no-bid repair program that has come under fire for shoddy work and inflated costs. The hearing is scheduled for 10 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By William C. Ward and William C. Ward,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
I was nine years old when I was introduced to the world of wall repairs.In a tantrum over an infringement of my civil rights (I was not allowed to watch television for more than 10 hours that day) I savagely kicked open the door to my bedroom and heard a sickening crack.The doorknob had stuck into the wall. As I gingerly pulled it away, a shower of white flecks tumbled out all over the floor.I was terrified. Not only had one of my civil rights been rescinded, but now I was going to experience capital punishment.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
The one-day blitz motto is a modest one for Christmas in April volunteers who launched the new chapter's first event yesterday.About 100 volunteers spent yesterday fixing up five homes belonging to people who are elderly, handicapped or otherwise unable to get the work done alone.But several of the volunteers plan to return this week to finish what couldn't be done by the time it started raining in the late afternoon.At many of the homes, the first step was clearing away accumulated garbage, crates, broken appliances and furniture and piles of wood, to make way for the construction improvements.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 9, 1996
A JOURNEY of a thousand miles begins with the first step, unless that step resembles the one sitting outside my back door. In that case, there is a strong chance that rather than landing 1,000 miles away, you will land on your backside. The step is loose. It rocks. It rolls. If you don't step on it as lightly as a cat, you can easily end up spread-eagle.I got a telephone call at work the other day telling me I should fix the step. The call came from one of my kids. It wasn't a suggestion.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 19, 1993
Since tomorrow is Father's Day, I'm sure a lot of folks are frantically trying to come up with home-repair type activities they can do with their Dads.Well, worry no more. Here in convenient list form are six activities that will please the old man.First is that ever-popular undertaking, Mapping Your Home's lTC Electric Circuits. This task doesn't merely allow every member of the family to participate, it requires it.It works like this: The Dad, armed with a pencil and paper, takes up his position at the circuit breaker box, also called the service panel.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
The Columbia Council is considering creating a revolving loan fund to help income-qualified residents make repairs on their homes to comply with the new town's architectural guidelines.Two banks -- the Columbia Bank and First National Bank of Maryland -- have expressed interest in financing and running the one-year pilot loan program, with the nonprofit Columbia Association as the underwriter, said Maggie Brown, the association's director of community services.Under tentative terms, the fund would total about $50,000 and would provide up to $3,000 per household for repairs by residents whose income is no more than 25 percent above the income-eligibility guidelines of the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | July 6, 2008
Everyone out there who wants to decorate a room by putting up some trendy wallpaper, please, reconsider. And by "reconsider," I mean come to my place and help me strip some 10-year-old wallpaper off the kitchen walls first. The thing about wallpaper is, it's glued to the wall. To my knowledge, the folks at 3M have not yet developed a Post-it wallpaper. Nor is there any Velcro wallpaper. What is wrong with America? Why is it that we can inhabit a space station for months on end doing important yet largely unintelligible research on the behavior of flames, fluids, metals and protein crystals in space, and yet we cannot come up with an easily removable wallpaper here on planet earth?
FEATURES
By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 9, 1994
Q: The windows in my older house need new putty. The old putty has deteriorated, and each window has many small panes of glass. How should I fix this?A: The most difficult part of the job will probably be the first step -- removing the old putty -- since the glass will crack unless great care is used. Also, if you plan to do the work yourself, you probably will have to do much of the work from a ladder, which also requires great care.An ordinary putty knife, used as a scraper, is often adequate for removing old putty, but my favorite tool is a combination tool sold at some paint stores and home centers.
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