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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 27, 2001
Q. I have a home remedy to share with your readers. If you have a cut that's bleeding, put ground cayenne pepper on it. The bleeding will stop quickly. You can get cayenne at the grocery store. A.When we first heard that ground black pepper could stop bleeding, we were skeptical. Now that we have had several opportunities to use this home remedy ourselves, we can attest to its value. Yours is not the first letter to suggest that cayenne pepper can be used in a similar manner. To our surprise, black pepper does not sting when sprinkled on a minor cut. We don't know whether cayenne would be irritating.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
When Herbert Johnson was a kid, an audible cough or a red-hot forehead would send his grandmother into action, dishing out treatments ranging from the unorthodox to the disgusting. "The emergency room was not an option back then," said the 73-year-old retiree. One of Johnson's first memories comes from a time his grandmother attempted to cure a headache by parting his hair into even sections, sprinkling his scalp with salt and tying brown paper to the ends of his hair. How exactly that was to help is unclear, but the technique has stuck with him, along with countless recollections of other home remedies.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 21, 2003
My 37-year-old daughter has battled canker sores her entire life. It's not unusual for her to have more than 10 at a time. She's tried a lot of different treatments through the years with little success. Recently she had a baby and did not have one sore the entire pregnancy. Six weeks after delivering, the sores came back in full force. Her doctor prescribed oral corticosteroid, which cleared up her mouth sores temporarily. They returned as soon as the steroids wore off. Incidentally, she is a nurse, but she has yet to find any help.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | November 24, 2008
I appreciate you writing about home remedies for children when they come down with colds, but I am alarmed that you suggested lemon and honey for coughs. I feel this needs an urgent disclaimer! Honey can be dangerous for a child under age 2. A friend's 6-month-old baby nearly died from infant botulism. Honey can cause this in infants. Even honey jars have a warning that it is not for small children. Thanks for the reminder. Young children 1-year-old and younger should never be given honey.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 16, 2003
I am a podiatrist, and I would like to comment on toenail fungus and treatment. When you write "Home remedies don't always work," you imply that sometimes they do work. This is untrue. Home remedies rarely work. There are real, doctor-prescribed, FDA-approved, clinically tested medications to treat toenail fungus. These include topical Penlac or oral Lamisil or Sporanox. I have successfully treated hundreds of patients with these drugs. The unproven treatments you mentioned are little more than urban legends.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
When Herbert Johnson was a kid, an audible cough or a red-hot forehead would send his grandmother into action, dishing out treatments ranging from the unorthodox to the disgusting. "The emergency room was not an option back then," said the 73-year-old retiree. One of Johnson's first memories comes from a time his grandmother attempted to cure a headache by parting his hair into even sections, sprinkling his scalp with salt and tying brown paper to the ends of his hair. How exactly that was to help is unclear, but the technique has stuck with him, along with countless recollections of other home remedies.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 26, 2000
Q. I am disappointed that you suggest gin-soaked raisins to relieve arthritis pain. I have served on the local public education committee for the Arthritis Foundation. During one meeting someone mentioned this remedy. A physician at the meeting said sarcastically: "Forget the raisins and just drink the gin. Neither will help, but the gin could make you forget your arthritis briefly." People with arthritis need the care of a competent rheumatologist who can prescribe appropriate medications.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 28, 1999
Q. I read in your column about a nondrug treatment for toenail fungus. Could you please send me the home remedy since I now have fungus myself? The prescription my doctor offered is way too expensive.A. Over the years we have collected lots of remedies for nail fungus. This infection can make nails thick, rough, yellowish-brown and crumbly. Our favorite approach is a vinegar soak -- 1 part vinegar to 2 parts warm water.Q. I took Zocor for high cholesterol and stopped because it caused me to have seizures.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | December 24, 2000
Q. I am a 44-year-old man with an old knee injury. About a year ago, it was causing me great pain, and I had it examined. The doctor checked the X-ray and told me that I had essentially no cartilage left. He prescribed Vioxx, which didn't do much for me. After reading your book on herbs and home remedies, I have been using this combination: Boswellia, turmeric and glucosamine. The pain in my knee is under control. Would it help to add the gin-soaked-raisin remedy? For various maladies, you list a variety of herbal and home- and folk-medicine remedies.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 18, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- A month before the season began, Maryland basketball coach Gary Williams was talking about the first four games of his team's ACC schedule."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 16, 2003
I am a podiatrist, and I would like to comment on toenail fungus and treatment. When you write "Home remedies don't always work," you imply that sometimes they do work. This is untrue. Home remedies rarely work. There are real, doctor-prescribed, FDA-approved, clinically tested medications to treat toenail fungus. These include topical Penlac or oral Lamisil or Sporanox. I have successfully treated hundreds of patients with these drugs. The unproven treatments you mentioned are little more than urban legends.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 21, 2003
My 37-year-old daughter has battled canker sores her entire life. It's not unusual for her to have more than 10 at a time. She's tried a lot of different treatments through the years with little success. Recently she had a baby and did not have one sore the entire pregnancy. Six weeks after delivering, the sores came back in full force. Her doctor prescribed oral corticosteroid, which cleared up her mouth sores temporarily. They returned as soon as the steroids wore off. Incidentally, she is a nurse, but she has yet to find any help.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 27, 2001
Q. I have a home remedy to share with your readers. If you have a cut that's bleeding, put ground cayenne pepper on it. The bleeding will stop quickly. You can get cayenne at the grocery store. A.When we first heard that ground black pepper could stop bleeding, we were skeptical. Now that we have had several opportunities to use this home remedy ourselves, we can attest to its value. Yours is not the first letter to suggest that cayenne pepper can be used in a similar manner. To our surprise, black pepper does not sting when sprinkled on a minor cut. We don't know whether cayenne would be irritating.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | December 24, 2000
Q. I am a 44-year-old man with an old knee injury. About a year ago, it was causing me great pain, and I had it examined. The doctor checked the X-ray and told me that I had essentially no cartilage left. He prescribed Vioxx, which didn't do much for me. After reading your book on herbs and home remedies, I have been using this combination: Boswellia, turmeric and glucosamine. The pain in my knee is under control. Would it help to add the gin-soaked-raisin remedy? For various maladies, you list a variety of herbal and home- and folk-medicine remedies.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 26, 2000
Q. I am disappointed that you suggest gin-soaked raisins to relieve arthritis pain. I have served on the local public education committee for the Arthritis Foundation. During one meeting someone mentioned this remedy. A physician at the meeting said sarcastically: "Forget the raisins and just drink the gin. Neither will help, but the gin could make you forget your arthritis briefly." People with arthritis need the care of a competent rheumatologist who can prescribe appropriate medications.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 28, 1999
Q. I read in your column about a nondrug treatment for toenail fungus. Could you please send me the home remedy since I now have fungus myself? The prescription my doctor offered is way too expensive.A. Over the years we have collected lots of remedies for nail fungus. This infection can make nails thick, rough, yellowish-brown and crumbly. Our favorite approach is a vinegar soak -- 1 part vinegar to 2 parts warm water.Q. I took Zocor for high cholesterol and stopped because it caused me to have seizures.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | December 27, 1994
Winter is hard on skin. Chapped hands, cracked nails, dry lips and nonstop dandruff are common problems this time of year. Low humidity is the culprit.Dermatologists tell us that some of the cheapest skin creams are the most effective. Petroleum jelly works wonders when it is applied after a bath or shower.But many of our readers prefer a different alternative, resorting to Bag Balm or Udder Cream, old-fashioned veterinary products that have a long track record as good moisturizers.Hairdressers and manicurists, who have their hands in water, chemicals and detergent much of the day, have written that such barnyard beauty aids restore moisture to rough skin.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | October 20, 1990
Among older folks who once knew nothing else, home remedies can die hard or not at all."I'm 72 years old," says George Sakievich. "Sixty years ago, I walked into the store. I was itching all over. I lived off of Belair Road and was playing in the woods."The storekeeper noted Sakievich's rising poison ivy patches, led him to a stream and showed him how to apply the milky insides of jewelweed, also known as wild touch-me-not. Sakievich remains a believer in this well-known folk remedy."You take this jewelweed and it's full of liquid," he says.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | December 27, 1994
Winter is hard on skin. Chapped hands, cracked nails, dry lips and nonstop dandruff are common problems this time of year. Low humidity is the culprit.Dermatologists tell us that some of the cheapest skin creams are the most effective. Petroleum jelly works wonders when it is applied after a bath or shower.But many of our readers prefer a different alternative, resorting to Bag Balm or Udder Cream, old-fashioned veterinary products that have a long track record as good moisturizers.Hairdressers and manicurists, who have their hands in water, chemicals and detergent much of the day, have written that such barnyard beauty aids restore moisture to rough skin.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 18, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- A month before the season began, Maryland basketball coach Gary Williams was talking about the first four games of his team's ACC schedule."
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