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By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
When Herbert Johnson was a kid, an audible cough or a red-hot forehead would send his grandmother into action, dishing out treatments ranging from the unorthodox to the disgusting. "The emergency room was not an option back then," said the 73-year-old retiree. One of Johnson's first memories comes from a time his grandmother attempted to cure a headache by parting his hair into even sections, sprinkling his scalp with salt and tying brown paper to the ends of his hair. How exactly that was to help is unclear, but the technique has stuck with him, along with countless recollections of other home remedies.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
When Herbert Johnson was a kid, an audible cough or a red-hot forehead would send his grandmother into action, dishing out treatments ranging from the unorthodox to the disgusting. "The emergency room was not an option back then," said the 73-year-old retiree. One of Johnson's first memories comes from a time his grandmother attempted to cure a headache by parting his hair into even sections, sprinkling his scalp with salt and tying brown paper to the ends of his hair. How exactly that was to help is unclear, but the technique has stuck with him, along with countless recollections of other home remedies.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 16, 2003
I am a podiatrist, and I would like to comment on toenail fungus and treatment. When you write "Home remedies don't always work," you imply that sometimes they do work. This is untrue. Home remedies rarely work. There are real, doctor-prescribed, FDA-approved, clinically tested medications to treat toenail fungus. These include topical Penlac or oral Lamisil or Sporanox. I have successfully treated hundreds of patients with these drugs. The unproven treatments you mentioned are little more than urban legends.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | December 14, 2009
Question: : My son, age 14, has suffered from chronic idiopathic urticaria (hives) for five years. Several months ago, your column featured another person suffering from hives. He had success with vitamin C, so we decided to try it. My son is now taking 1,000 mg of vitamin C twice a day. He has been able to stop two of his three medications, Zyrtec and famotidine. With his doctor's approval, he has halved his Allegra prescription. We are so thankful! Answer: : We found nothing recent in the medical literature on this approach.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 26, 2000
Q. I am disappointed that you suggest gin-soaked raisins to relieve arthritis pain. I have served on the local public education committee for the Arthritis Foundation. During one meeting someone mentioned this remedy. A physician at the meeting said sarcastically: "Forget the raisins and just drink the gin. Neither will help, but the gin could make you forget your arthritis briefly." People with arthritis need the care of a competent rheumatologist who can prescribe appropriate medications.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | December 27, 1994
Winter is hard on skin. Chapped hands, cracked nails, dry lips and nonstop dandruff are common problems this time of year. Low humidity is the culprit.Dermatologists tell us that some of the cheapest skin creams are the most effective. Petroleum jelly works wonders when it is applied after a bath or shower.But many of our readers prefer a different alternative, resorting to Bag Balm or Udder Cream, old-fashioned veterinary products that have a long track record as good moisturizers.Hairdressers and manicurists, who have their hands in water, chemicals and detergent much of the day, have written that such barnyard beauty aids restore moisture to rough skin.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | December 24, 2000
Q. I am a 44-year-old man with an old knee injury. About a year ago, it was causing me great pain, and I had it examined. The doctor checked the X-ray and told me that I had essentially no cartilage left. He prescribed Vioxx, which didn't do much for me. After reading your book on herbs and home remedies, I have been using this combination: Boswellia, turmeric and glucosamine. The pain in my knee is under control. Would it help to add the gin-soaked-raisin remedy? For various maladies, you list a variety of herbal and home- and folk-medicine remedies.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | October 20, 1990
Among older folks who once knew nothing else, home remedies can die hard or not at all."I'm 72 years old," says George Sakievich. "Sixty years ago, I walked into the store. I was itching all over. I lived off of Belair Road and was playing in the woods."The storekeeper noted Sakievich's rising poison ivy patches, led him to a stream and showed him how to apply the milky insides of jewelweed, also known as wild touch-me-not. Sakievich remains a believer in this well-known folk remedy."You take this jewelweed and it's full of liquid," he says.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | October 22, 2000
Q.Thank you for printing the vinegar treatment for foot fungus. My husband has had so-called jungle rot since his days as a soldier in Vietnam. It's been incurable, but now it is all but gone, with only a few soaks needed every so often to keep it from coming back. My father, an eye doctor, told an elderly patient about vinegar. She was about to have a toenail amputated by another doctor because the fungus could not be cured. She started soaking her foot and saved her toenail. A.Dermatologists groan when we write about home remedies for nail fungus.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | January 5, 2009
I foolishly picked up a plastic honey bear that was in a pot of boiling water, and the honey squirted out all over the palm of my hand. Immediately, I ran it under cold water, and then I ran to get your book because I knew there was something I could put on burns that was natural: mustard. I had mustard in the fridge, and I poured it all over the palm of my hand. It still burned like the devil, but I left it on while I read more. I put more mustard on, wrapped gauze bandage around it and left it on for a while until the pain subsided.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 13, 2009
Do you have any information on natural treatments for a sore ganglion cyst on the wrist? I have been using a wrap-around brace on my wrist and would prefer to handle this without medication or surgery. A ganglion cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms on joints such as the wrist, ankles, feet or fingers. If the sac presses on a nerve, it may be painful. Such cysts often disappear on their own, so "watch and wait" is the first choice for treatment. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons also recommends wearing a brace to immobilize the joint.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | February 23, 2009
Some time ago, I heard an unusual home remedy on your radio show: using Elmer's glue to prevent blistering on a burned hand. I burned myself last night and initially iced my hand. Since I've never had much luck with icing burns, I decided to try the glue method, which consists of spreading glue over the burned area and letting it harden. I repeated this covering a couple of times to form something like a second skin over the burn. Eight hours later, as I write, the skin is a little tender, but there are no blisters.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | January 5, 2009
I foolishly picked up a plastic honey bear that was in a pot of boiling water, and the honey squirted out all over the palm of my hand. Immediately, I ran it under cold water, and then I ran to get your book because I knew there was something I could put on burns that was natural: mustard. I had mustard in the fridge, and I poured it all over the palm of my hand. It still burned like the devil, but I left it on while I read more. I put more mustard on, wrapped gauze bandage around it and left it on for a while until the pain subsided.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | November 24, 2008
I appreciate you writing about home remedies for children when they come down with colds, but I am alarmed that you suggested lemon and honey for coughs. I feel this needs an urgent disclaimer! Honey can be dangerous for a child under age 2. A friend's 6-month-old baby nearly died from infant botulism. Honey can cause this in infants. Even honey jars have a warning that it is not for small children. Thanks for the reminder. Young children 1-year-old and younger should never be given honey.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | June 26, 2008
I've been advised to use diaper-rash ointment containing zinc oxide to keep my horse's muzzle from getting sunburned while he's grazing. I've been wondering if this would also work to keep me from developing a "horsewoman's tan." All of the sunscreens I have tried help me avoid sunburn, but I have brown arms from the edge of my gloves to the edge of the short-sleeved shirts. For decades, lifeguards have used white zinc oxide to keep their noses from burning. It blocks both UVA and UVB rays and provides excellent protection.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmcy.com | July 19, 2007
I have battled toenail fungus off and on for the past 25 years. I have tried all sorts of OTC and prescription topical medicines, including Lamisil. I decided to try two of the remedies I read about in your column. I applied hydrogen peroxide with a cotton ball to my toenails after I bathed daily. Then I applied Vicks VapoRub to my feet and toenails and put on socks to sleep in. Within a month, I had no more toenail fungus. Toenail fungus can be tough to treat. Prescription medicines such as Lamisil are expensive and require medical monitoring for liver problems and other potential side effects.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 16, 1994
People love home remedies for everything from bee stings to colds or tummy aches. But nothing has captured our readers' imaginations like the raisin remedy for arthritis.Several months ago, we received a note attached to a clipping that described soaking golden raisins in gin, letting the gin evaporate, and then eating nine a day to combat arthritis pain and stiffness. The reader who sent it said his wife had been given the recipe by a neighbor.Well, we'd never heard of this remedy before and we thought it sounded a little strange.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 13, 2009
Do you have any information on natural treatments for a sore ganglion cyst on the wrist? I have been using a wrap-around brace on my wrist and would prefer to handle this without medication or surgery. A ganglion cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms on joints such as the wrist, ankles, feet or fingers. If the sac presses on a nerve, it may be painful. Such cysts often disappear on their own, so "watch and wait" is the first choice for treatment. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons also recommends wearing a brace to immobilize the joint.
FEATURES
By JOSEPH SJOSTROM and JOSEPH SJOSTROM,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 12, 2006
Bats. Electric bug zappers. Tiny fish. Insecticides. As mosquito-control devices, they all work. And they all don't. The quest to repel mosquitoes has led people to try some unorthodox methods. But a nature center in Itasca, Ill., tried one this summer that was particularly pungent: garlic. It's a garlic-oil product marketed as harmless to the environment but effective in killing and repelling mosquitoes. But, like most repellents, it showed mixed results. Fred Maier, director of the Spring Brook Nature Center, said his workers sprayed garlic oil on an acre of woods June 13 and July 6, then used two traps -- one placed on the sprayed land and one on unsprayed land.
NEWS
By Holly Shiver and Holly Shiver,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
COLD COMFORT With cold and flu season lingering, try mixing two of the most common home remedies -- green tea and chicken noodle soup -- to alleviate your symptoms. Here's a recipe from the Salada Green Tea Co. Cut 8 ounces of boneless, skinless chicken into 1/2 -inch portions, place in a large bowl and add 1/2 cup brewed green tea. Cover and refrigerate, letting chicken marinate for 1 hour. Soak 5 ounces of noodles in warm water until soft. Drain. Place 4 cups chicken stock, 2 slices lightly mashed ginger root, 1/2 cup cubed oyster mushrooms, 2 cups diced celery, 1 cup diced carrots, 2 cups diced onions and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley in a large pot and bring to a boil over high heat.
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