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NEWS
March 17, 2010
Hundreds of Navy personnel have disembarked from the hospital ship USNS Comfort in Norfolk, Va., as it returns from a seven-week mission treating earthquake victims in Haiti. The hospital ship arrived at Naval Station Norfolk on Saturday. It's scheduled to leave Thursday and arrive at its home port in Baltimore on Friday. Navy officials say 500 of the ship's 700 personnel disembarked over the weekend. - Associated Press
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | June 21, 2014
For midshipman Duncan Mamer, the skipper of a Navy 44, the waiting was the hardest part of the 19th biennial Annapolis-Bermuda Race. "The prevailing conditions for this race were mostly just lots and lots of light air," said Mamer, a Caldwell, Iowa, resident and rising senior on the Naval Academy's varsity offshore sailing team. "Whether it was on the Chesapeake [Bay] or half an hour from the finish line, we definitely spent our fair share of time drifting around. "The biggest challenge was definitely just always trying to keep the boat moving.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
Amid growing political pressure, the U.S. Navy secretary yesterday reversed his recent directive that ended Baltimore's so-called home port status. The reversal made Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip yard again eligible for most Navy repair work.In a letter to members of Maryland's congressional delegation, Navy Secretary John H. Dalton said that he was reinstating the long-standing home port status for Baltimore and Portland, Ore. The secretary gave no reason for reversing his June 21 decision.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Naval Petty Officer Alonzo M. Gladden Jr. had been back home for only four hours last October when an unknown person opened fire on him - killing him shortly after he dropped off his grandmother in South Baltimore. Months later, his killing remains unsolved, and city police have turned to Baltimore's Guardian Angels for help with the case. On Sunday, standing amid broken liquor bottles at the corner of Hollins Ferry Road and Patapsco Avenue, the volunteers and Gladden's relatives passed out fliers and held up signs asking passing motorists for leads in the case.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | October 20, 2007
Justyn Exman's impatience was turning quickly to anxiety. "Daddy!" the 5-year-old yelled. "Where are you?" Justyn, his mom and his 9-year-old sister, along with about 60 other people, were waiting - and waiting - yesterday morning while the mammoth hospital ship USNS Comfort, having just spent four months on a humanitarian mission to Latin America and the Caribbean, cruised into its home port in Baltimore and docked. It was a lengthy, laborious process. It was not until 9:45 a.m., after some had been standing on the pier for almost two hours, that crew members and medical staff began disembarking.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip division has won a $1.7 million Navy contract that will provide a month's work for 160 employees.David Watson, president of the Sparrows Point shipyard, announced the award of a contract to mothball the Military Sealift Command tanker USNS Humphreys.Ted Baldwin, a company spokesman, said the work includes making the tanker resistant to rust and corrosion so it would be ready for future use. "It's a fairly typical contract for us," he said.The Humphreys will join two other Military Sealift Command vessels being repaired at BethShip.
NEWS
March 10, 2002
MARYLAND'S economic boosters will get some bragging rights later this month, when Celebrity's 1,850-passenger Galaxy starts using Baltimore as its home port. That ship and its rivals are expected to make 42 cruises altogether from Dundalk this year. Celebrity came here by default. After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the line simply wanted to shift its New York-based ships to other home ports. Celebrity, a subsidiary of Royal Caribbean, is a big catch. It gives Baltimore instant respect in cruise circles.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
The fleet of Coast Guard vessels that call Baltimore home port increased by one Wednesday when the 65-foot cutter Chock arrived from Virginia. The harbor tugboat, built in 1961, was transferred from Portsmouth. The Chock and its crew of eight will be used for homeland security patrols, law enforcement and ice-breaking in the upper bay. It also will continue to be used in the lower bay. Capt. Mark O'Malley, the Coast Guard's captain of the port of Baltimore, called it "a privilege" to add the cutter to the Curtis Bay operation, noting its "long history of superior service to the mariners of the Chesapeake Bay. " Baltimore's Coast Guard station responds to more than 200 search-and-rescue incidents and conducts more than 370 law enforcement boardings annually.
NEWS
By Joseph A. Gambardello and Joseph A. Gambardello,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 19, 2001
CAMDEN, N.J. - The countdown continues. For teams of ironworkers, bricklayers, pile drivers, painters, air-conditioning technicians, pipe fitters, divers, and plain old volunteers, not much time remains to get the USS New Jersey ready if it is to open to the public sometime after Labor Day. The work moved into high gear in recent weeks with the awarding of $5.4 million in contracts. Nearly half the money came from the Delaware River Port Authority as an advance on expected state funding.
NEWS
By Joseph A. Gambardello and Joseph A. Gambardello,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 15, 2001
CAMDEN, N.J. - Tony Altadonna, a retired RCA worker, is 78, the father of four and the grandfather of nine. You could say he is in his twilight years. Just don't let him hear you say it. "I'm having a great time," said the Pennsauken man, who is keeping busy as a volunteer aboard the USS New Jersey. "It's the best therapy," said Altadonna, who was a mechanic in the Army Air Forces during World War II. "I don't have to go the doctor's anymore." The Home Port Alliance, the nonprofit group working to turn the New Jersey into a memorial museum on the Delaware River, plans to spend $20 million restoring the battleship and building its pier and shoreside complex.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
Seven years after opening the South Locust Point cruise ship berth and terminal, Maryland port officials have a problem: capacity, as in, not enough. Without expansion, the record-breaking annual statistics will plateau at about 100 cruises and 241,000 passengers a year. It is a profitable perch, but not one that fits the port of Baltimore's competitive nature or record of expanding market share wherever it can - from autos to coal. And with an annual economic value to Maryland estimated to be $90 million and 220 jobs, the cruise ship business is an asset worth protecting and continuing to develop.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
The fleet of Coast Guard vessels that call Baltimore home port increased by one Wednesday when the 65-foot cutter Chock arrived from Virginia. The harbor tugboat, built in 1961, was transferred from Portsmouth. The Chock and its crew of eight will be used for homeland security patrols, law enforcement and ice-breaking in the upper bay. It also will continue to be used in the lower bay. Capt. Mark O'Malley, the Coast Guard's captain of the port of Baltimore, called it "a privilege" to add the cutter to the Curtis Bay operation, noting its "long history of superior service to the mariners of the Chesapeake Bay. " Baltimore's Coast Guard station responds to more than 200 search-and-rescue incidents and conducts more than 370 law enforcement boardings annually.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
John Frederic Requardt Jr., a retired businessman who enjoyed sailing, died Feb. 10 of complications from a stroke at William Hill Manor in Easton. The one-time Trappe resident was 92. The son of a lawyer and a homemaker, Mr. Requardt was born in Baltimore. He was the grandson of Marie Oehl von Hattersheim Bauernschmidt, a well-known Baltimore political crusader for more than 40 years who died in 1962. Mr. Requardt attended Gilman School and graduated in 1939 from the Kent School in Kent, Conn.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
When the Coast Guard's tall ship Eagle glided under the Key Bridge on Wednesday morning, it looked a lot better than it did when it arrived at the Inner Harbor four months ago. A fresh coat of white paint covered the upper hull. Six miles of ropes and rigging were tightrope-taut. And from the ship's bow jutted a regilded eagle, its talons gripping the Coast Guard crest. "She's done and she's looking good," said John Downes, a Baltimore native who supervised the team of Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard workers that carried out the $5 million refurbishing, from keel to mast tip. Escorted by a Maryland Natural Resources Police boat and two tugs, the 295-foot ship turned down the Chesapeake Bay on its way to the Atlantic and its home port at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2010
Despite a deep recession that has put a crimp in vacation budgets, a record number of cruise ship passengers and voyages are expected at the port of Baltimore this year. Last week, Royal Caribbean launched year-round cruise service from the city, and its Enchantment of the Seas cruise liner set sail for the first time from its new home port in Locust Point. As more people are choosing the sometimes deeply discounted cruise vacations, Baltimore's piece of the industry is benefitting from being a "drive-to" location.
NEWS
March 17, 2010
Hundreds of Navy personnel have disembarked from the hospital ship USNS Comfort in Norfolk, Va., as it returns from a seven-week mission treating earthquake victims in Haiti. The hospital ship arrived at Naval Station Norfolk on Saturday. It's scheduled to leave Thursday and arrive at its home port in Baltimore on Friday. Navy officials say 500 of the ship's 700 personnel disembarked over the weekend. - Associated Press
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau Doug Struck of the Jerusalem Bureau contributed to this article | February 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Navy is exploring the possibility of basing an aircraft carrier, minesweepers or other ships of the 6th Fleet in the Israeli port of Haifa, a major shift in deployment strategy that could have serious repercussions at home and in the Middle East.Navy officials say privately they are not eager to initiate such a move. But they say pressure from Senate committees and pro-Israel interests in Washington help to explain why they are considering Haifa as a possible home port for U.S. ships.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
Seven years after opening the South Locust Point cruise ship berth and terminal, Maryland port officials have a problem: capacity, as in, not enough. Without expansion, the record-breaking annual statistics will plateau at about 100 cruises and 241,000 passengers a year. It is a profitable perch, but not one that fits the port of Baltimore's competitive nature or record of expanding market share wherever it can - from autos to coal. And with an annual economic value to Maryland estimated to be $90 million and 220 jobs, the cruise ship business is an asset worth protecting and continuing to develop.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | October 20, 2007
Justyn Exman's impatience was turning quickly to anxiety. "Daddy!" the 5-year-old yelled. "Where are you?" Justyn, his mom and his 9-year-old sister, along with about 60 other people, were waiting - and waiting - yesterday morning while the mammoth hospital ship USNS Comfort, having just spent four months on a humanitarian mission to Latin America and the Caribbean, cruised into its home port in Baltimore and docked. It was a lengthy, laborious process. It was not until 9:45 a.m., after some had been standing on the pier for almost two hours, that crew members and medical staff began disembarking.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Reporter | October 16, 2007
The horses neighed nervously as cameramen and sound guys scurried among them, but somehow an animal was singled out, harnessed and mounted - by Ty Pennington himself. For once, though, the spiky-haired, muscle-bound star of Extreme Makeover: Home Edition was not clutching his trademark microphone, which he uses to bellow orders and inspiration. He needed both hands to hold on as his bewildered steed trotted and the cameras rolled, capturing footage of this Port Deposit horse ranch in the midst of a metamorphosis.
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