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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 9, 2008
Once upon a time, when I had a weekly show on WMAR-TV, the producers and I put a call out for home movies - not videos, but the 8 mm and Super8 film packed in shoe boxes and stored away in attics, closets and garages all over Baltimore. Once upon a time, people made home movies - reel after reel of them - and especially at family gatherings during the holidays. In 1998, we wanted to see some and air segments on our show, to present a picture of a bygone Baltimore. The response was quite strong.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
"Our Nixon," a documentary on Richard Nixon's presidency based on Super 8 home movies made by aides John Ehrlichman, H.R. Haldeman and Dwight Chapin, is the TV surprise and delight of the summer. It premieres at 9 tonight (Aug. 1) on CNN with multiple plays throughout the month. This is absolutely first-rate history that instantly transports you to the tumultuous times of the late 1960s and early '70s when Richard Nixon soared so high and fell so low. I admit I am complete Watergate and Nixon-era junkie, so bear that in mind when you listen to this podcast preview I did for Baltimore's WYPR-FM (88.1)
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 26, 1999
At first glance, the films of Lynne Sachs and Mark Street look like home movies -- the sort of intimate portraits of families and journeys that may not necessarily translate to a wider audience.But in their hands, such otherwise banal subjects as a visit with a far-flung sibling or the daily growth of the couple's eldest daughter blossom into poetic meditations on such universal -- and always absorbing -- themes of dislocation, intimacy and the swoon of new parenthood.Three of their short films will be shown tonight at The Lodge in Highlandtown.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
On Late Night With David Letterman, it was riotously funny to watch Sacha Baron Cohen accept accolades for the quarter-billion-dollar success of Borat, then explain how, for his new film, Bruno, he set up a meeting with a West Bank terrorist and staged a potentially deadly cage match in Arkansas. I eagerly await the "making of" documentary on DVD. In fact, that appearance had everything the feature film lacks: a lucid explanation for the action in the movie and an interlocutor, Letterman, who could provide a sane response to extreme material.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2004
Roll it. Home movies you will NOT see at today's Home Movie Day at the Patterson arts center in Baltimore: John Kerry's home movies, as seen in A Remarkable Promise, the nominee's campaign film that aired at the Democratic National Convention. Arnold and Jesse Friedman jailed on molestation charges, as seen in the family's home movies featured in the documentary, Capturing the Friedmans. Sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll, as seen in home movies featured in a recent documentary about the heavy metal band Metallica.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
He isn't in the movie business. He doesn't have a huge stash of money in the bank. Nor does he have a lot of spare time on his hands. Bob Rathmann, 33, is a full-time nursing student. He's a husband and a self-employed carpenter/handyman. In other words, he has a life. So why did this man build a movie screen, buy a 16-millimeter film projector, secure the necessary permits (and even distribute the brochures himself) - all to create a free outdoor movie festival in Charles Village? "I just really, really, really enjoy my neighborhood," says Rathmann, who kicks of his five-week festival tonight after sunset in Wyman Park Dell.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 26, 1999
The concept of Paula Poundstone as a TV mom is quite enough to stop me in my tracks. Now try to get your mind around this: Paula Poundstone as a TV mom done up in the wobbly, minimalist animation known as Squiggle-Vision to fans of "Dr. Katz: Professional Therapist."Where have you gone, Donna Reed?You might also wonder where the prime-time TV family is going these days when you see "Home Movies," which premieres tonight at 8: 30 on UPN. In addition to the SquiggleVision version of Poundstone as a single mom named Paula Small who never gets out of her baseball cap and sweats even for dates, there's Brendon, her highly strung son, and baby Josie, a gurgling pre-tot in big glasses and a perennially wet diaper.
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | December 30, 2007
This is a true story. Only the pronouns have been changed to protect the emotionally challenged. In the days before all this quick-draw photography, humans (circa 1980s) relied on only one piece of technology to record life with child: the analog camcorder. And, in many homes, the cute-as-a-bug, analog Sony Camcorder nosed itself into every occasion: The blessed moment during labor when Lamaze was thrown out of the hospital window, the nurse weighing your newborn, the wheelchair ride to the hospital parking lot, every birthday, every holiday (except Flag Day)
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 27, 2003
Viruses. Worms. Trojan horses. Drive-by downloads. Adware. Spyware. Browser hijackers. Zombies. Spam. These are the Nine Plagues of the Internet -- insidious assaults on our sanity, productivity and peace of mind. But it's only a matter of time till the Tenth Plague descends on us, and I predict it will eventually dwarf the others. I'm talking about home movies. That's right. How many of you have spent hours, bored to distraction, watching the entire gruesome record of some friend or relative's trip to Disney World?
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | May 2, 1998
IT WAS A CHANCE remark spoken the other day over lunch. Three of us were gabbing away at the Owl Bar in The Belvedere. Baltimore architect Walter Schamu said that this past Sunday was so beautiful that Greenway -- and Sherwood Gardens -- looked like a scene from a painting by Degas.I took another spoon of bread pudding and considered that comparison. I too had been walking around the Guilford neighborhood. It was true. People were out and about, walking, driving, snooping, breathing in a deep gulp of a lush Baltimore spring afternoon.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 20, 2009
A documentary about a mad 1960s household, Must Read After My Death, constructed out of tape, Dictaphone recordings and home movies, premieres theatrically today in New York and digitally everywhere via its distributor's Web site, giganticdigital.com. The company charges $2.99 for a three-day "ticket," good for any number of viewings, and promises to stream the film in any quality up to high definition. Viewers will be able to adjust the image according to what looks right for their home screen.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 9, 2008
Once upon a time, when I had a weekly show on WMAR-TV, the producers and I put a call out for home movies - not videos, but the 8 mm and Super8 film packed in shoe boxes and stored away in attics, closets and garages all over Baltimore. Once upon a time, people made home movies - reel after reel of them - and especially at family gatherings during the holidays. In 1998, we wanted to see some and air segments on our show, to present a picture of a bygone Baltimore. The response was quite strong.
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | December 30, 2007
This is a true story. Only the pronouns have been changed to protect the emotionally challenged. In the days before all this quick-draw photography, humans (circa 1980s) relied on only one piece of technology to record life with child: the analog camcorder. And, in many homes, the cute-as-a-bug, analog Sony Camcorder nosed itself into every occasion: The blessed moment during labor when Lamaze was thrown out of the hospital window, the nurse weighing your newborn, the wheelchair ride to the hospital parking lot, every birthday, every holiday (except Flag Day)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
An outdoor triple feature from Baltimore's connoisseur of bad taste, John Waters, is on tap tonight at Middlebranch Park, 3301 Waterview Ave. Part of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema's Rolling Roadshow Tour, tonight's fest of Waters' best includes the nonmusical version of Hairspray (1988); Polyester (1981), an ode to life in suburbia starring Divine and Tab Hunter; and Desperate Living (1977), all about life in a garbage dump-cum-homeless shelter known as Mortville. As if that lineup isn't enough, the first 250 people to show up will get a free limited-edition Odorama card, essential for experiencing Polyester in all its glory.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | December 18, 2006
It began as a typical Christmas morning eight years ago, two kids in pajamas opening presents. Brandon Kuzma, who had received a pogo stick the year before, was expecting a skateboard. But as the 9-year-old peeled the gold wrapping paper from his parents' gift, he knew what his heart really wanted. ... "Nintendo 64! ... Oh, my God!" Brandon's screams and the repeated bellows of "Thank you" from Rachel, his 6-year-old sister, resounded in at least a minute of unmitigated joy that their father Tom captured on home video - not unlike scenes filmed in millions of homes on Christmas morning.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,sun reporter | September 22, 2005
Instructions for reading this article: insert tongue firmly in cheek. After all, that's where John Waters has placed his. A film crew will take up residence today and tomorrow outside Waters' home in the Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood to begin filming a new television series called - what else? - John Waters Presents Movies That Will Corrupt You. The 13-episode series will begin airing in Baltimore and throughout the country in January on Here! one of American TV's two all-gay television networks.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
An outdoor triple feature from Baltimore's connoisseur of bad taste, John Waters, is on tap tonight at Middlebranch Park, 3301 Waterview Ave. Part of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema's Rolling Roadshow Tour, tonight's fest of Waters' best includes the nonmusical version of Hairspray (1988); Polyester (1981), an ode to life in suburbia starring Divine and Tab Hunter; and Desperate Living (1977), all about life in a garbage dump-cum-homeless shelter known as Mortville. As if that lineup isn't enough, the first 250 people to show up will get a free limited-edition Odorama card, essential for experiencing Polyester in all its glory.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
Two more season finales, a nostalgic "Brady Bunch" hour and a study of a 14-year-old violin virtuoso highlight a diverse evening.* "Houdini: Unlocking His Secrets" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The great escape artist worked some of his magic in Baltimore, such as on an April day in 1916 when he escaped from a straitjacket while dangling from the old Sun building. Robert Urich is host of a special that presents modern magicians who re-create some of Harry Houdini's famous illusions.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
Your old man could never hold the cine camera still, so it always looked as if family birthdays and holidays were spent near the San Andreas Fault. Too often there were shots of you squinting in sunlight. Zoom lenses confirmed that your thighs were too big. And your poignant quips were usually drowned out by the clicking sound of the film threading through the projector. What would any home be without home movies, the original reality shows? Haven't seen those celluloid memories for a while?
FEATURES
By Michael Wilmington and Michael Wilmington,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 5, 2005
Watching Jonathan Caouette's amazing autobiographical documentary Tarnation is like descending into a pop-music, underground-movie hell and heaven, the shattered and shattering landscape of a living body and mind. It's a film vision both painfully lucid and charged with delirium and ecstasy. Traversing his own life and hard times - and those of his mother, Renee LeBlanc, and grandparents Adolph and Rosemary Davis - through 20 years of mostly home-movie material he had shot since the age of 11, Caouette has crafted a brilliant piece of confessional cinema, one capable of radically altering the film world around it. Tarnation (which opens today at the Charles)
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