Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHome Market
IN THE NEWS

Home Market

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
The home on Belfast Road in Timonium was just a foundation when the newly married couple in their mid-20s made an offer on it last summer for $10,000 above the asking price. "This was the first time we were ready to even think about buying," said Tim Shirah, who with his wife, Michele Shirah, submitted a $395,000 bid and beat a handful of other offers for the new home. They wanted to stop "throwing money away on rent," he said. For the Shirahs, the time was right. They had money from their wedding to put more than 20 percent down and interest rates were at extraordinary lows.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
At first, Baldwin Homes didn't build green. Then it dipped its corporate toe in - one home here, another there. Now the Gambrills company is constructing an entire green neighborhood. It's the story of U.S. home building writ small. Green accounted for 2 percent of the new-home market in 2005, according to a report by industry data provider McGraw Hill Construction. By last year it had ballooned to 23 percent - nearly a quarter. "I don't think green is a niche market anymore," said Michele A. Russo, director of green content at McGraw Hill Construction.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Baltimore viewers are tuning into the Orioles postseason play on TBS in big numbers, according to Nielsen Media figures for the first three games. An average audience of 370,783 Baltimore viewers watched the Orioles beat the Texas Rangers in a one-game wildcard showdown Friday. That audience Friday night peaked at 452,530 at 11:30 p.m. Meanwhile 348,442 viewers tuned in Sunday night in Game 1 of ALDS against the New York Yankees. That audience peaked at 394,996 at 11:15 p.m. Sunday.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Baltimore's home market shifted this year, but a spike in interest rates may unsettle the balance again. "Back in the beginning of January … all of the buyers thought they were still in the buyer's market. Then, in the beginning of February, all the rules changed," said Lynn Ikle, an agent with Redfin who leads a sales team that works throughout the metro region. The number of homes for sale became too small to keep up with demand, and power returned to sellers, Ikle said. Eager to take advantage of historically low interest rates, buyers placed multiple bids on desirable properties, with some even waiving inspections and making other concessions unheard of since the bubble burst, she said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
What if the cable guy was also your home security guy? Maryland consumers are about to find out. Comcast Corp. has launched a marketing blitz this month to sign up customers for its new "Xfinity Home" package, which features a residential alarm system, video monitoring, and temperature and lighting controls, among other features — all manipulated from a touchpad, mobile device or computer. It's not enough for major telecom and cable companies to sell you services for your television, computer and smartphone.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | October 30, 2008
Here's another example of why the Rays' home fans don't deserve a team in the World Series: Game 5's rating Monday in the Tampa-St. Petersburg market was 28.1, with a 40 share. (In Philadelphia, the numbers were 45.2/60.) So with its team facing Series elimination, not even half of the home market that was watching television could be bothered to flip the channel to check out the game. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/mediumwell)
BUSINESS
By San Francisco Chronicle | April 3, 1995
Hewlett-Packard is making its long-awaited entry into the home computer market this week, announcing a line of aggressively priced multimedia machines that could vault the company into the front ranks of PC manufacturers.Although Palo Alto, Calif.-based HP is a latecomer to the home market, analysts say it is well-positioned to become a major force. The computer and electronics giant already is the ninth-largest and second-fastest growing PC company, even though it has focused exclusively on the business market.
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 1997
A lot of people would call the Commodore computer a dinosaur -- old, slow and obsolete. Dedicated members of the Brooklyn Park Users' Group, however, have a different view.They say the very simplicity of the Commodore is its best feature. And while Commodores are challenged by modern graphic-intense computer programs, they admit, the old computers still can provide hours of enjoyment."I have an IBM, and if I have work to do I use it. But when I want to have fun, I use my Commodore," says Don Graham, a charter member of the group.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1995
Future home contracts 22% lower than April '94April contracts for future residential construction in Maryland were 22 percent lower than in 1994, according to figures released by the F. W. Dodge Division of DRI-McGraw Hill Inc. of New York. F. W. Dodge reported that contracts for one- and two-family houses and apartments totaled $198.5 million in April compared with $254.5 million during the same period last year.Despite the April decline, residential construction in Maryland is up by 19 percent for the first four months of 1995 at 960.2 million compared with $807.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
If you are trying to sell a home in Howard County, spring could be a mean season. But if you are a potential buyer, life is good.That's because the housing market in Howard County has been in the basement for seven months now. Housing sales in January continued a 7-month slide, dropping 6.8 percent overall last month compared to January 1994.With interest rates not expected to drop this spring, real estate experts expect sales during the next few months to remain flat in Howard.Howard is the most expensive market for a home in the Baltimore region, with the average price of a county home sold in January $203,229.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
The last time Yasmin and Adil Degani bought a home, they took the traditional route. They went with a commission-based real estate brokerage to show them homes and guide them through the homebuying process. This time around, in an effort to save money and time, they decided to try an emerging path. The Odenton couple went with Redfin, a "technology-powered brokerage" that employs salaried agents and encourages buyers to use online profiles of homes to determine what properties to tour.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
The home on Belfast Road in Timonium was just a foundation when the newly married couple in their mid-20s made an offer on it last summer for $10,000 above the asking price. "This was the first time we were ready to even think about buying," said Tim Shirah, who with his wife, Michele Shirah, submitted a $395,000 bid and beat a handful of other offers for the new home. They wanted to stop "throwing money away on rent," he said. For the Shirahs, the time was right. They had money from their wedding to put more than 20 percent down and interest rates were at extraordinary lows.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
As president of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage's Greater Baltimore operations, Dean Cottrill has gotten to know the real estate markets of a great number of communities — from the heart of Baltimore to Ocean City . "I'm all over the place and I love it," said Cottrill, who started his real estate career more than two decades ago, after a stint as an accountant. He worked as a sales agent for just over seven years before moving into management. In 2007, Cottrill joined Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage as a regional vice president.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Baltimore viewers are tuning into the Orioles postseason play on TBS in big numbers, according to Nielsen Media figures for the first three games. An average audience of 370,783 Baltimore viewers watched the Orioles beat the Texas Rangers in a one-game wildcard showdown Friday. That audience Friday night peaked at 452,530 at 11:30 p.m. Meanwhile 348,442 viewers tuned in Sunday night in Game 1 of ALDS against the New York Yankees. That audience peaked at 394,996 at 11:15 p.m. Sunday.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
The Baltimore metro region had the best July in six years for contracts signed to buy homes, according to data released Friday by an affiliate of the region's multiple listing service. Home buyers signed 2,883 contracts last month — a nearly 20 percent increase over July 2011, according to sales figures from RealEstate Business Intelligence LLC. It was the highest July total for new contracts since 2006, said a statement from the firm, which is an arm of Metropolitan Regional Information Systems.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
What if the cable guy was also your home security guy? Maryland consumers are about to find out. Comcast Corp. has launched a marketing blitz this month to sign up customers for its new "Xfinity Home" package, which features a residential alarm system, video monitoring, and temperature and lighting controls, among other features — all manipulated from a touchpad, mobile device or computer. It's not enough for major telecom and cable companies to sell you services for your television, computer and smartphone.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2000
Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corp.'s latest Home Price Comparison Index is a preliminary guide for consumers who are looking to relocate and want to know what home they can afford in another part of the country. Coldwell Banker defined the average home as a 2,200-square-foot, single-family dwelling with four bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, family room and two-car garage in a typical middle management transferee neighborhood. Within Maryland, Anne Arundel County came closest to the national average of $244,600 with an average home sale price of $245,333.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
As president of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage's Greater Baltimore operations, Dean Cottrill has gotten to know the real estate markets of a great number of communities — from the heart of Baltimore to Ocean City . "I'm all over the place and I love it," said Cottrill, who started his real estate career more than two decades ago, after a stint as an accountant. He worked as a sales agent for just over seven years before moving into management. In 2007, Cottrill joined Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage as a regional vice president.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
A Baltimore developer will try to jump-start sales of high-end waterfront homes this month by slashing prices as much as 75 percent, a move that could lure more buyers to the region's long-stalled luxury market but also depress values for builders and homeowners. Eleven properties in Pier Homes at HarborView, where about half the 88 waterfront townhouses finished two years ago have yet to be sold, will go to auction June 28. Minimum bids the developer would accept start as low as $329,000 for a home that's on the market now for $1.2 million up to $665,000 for a home with a current asking price of just under $2 million.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | October 30, 2008
Here's another example of why the Rays' home fans don't deserve a team in the World Series: Game 5's rating Monday in the Tampa-St. Petersburg market was 28.1, with a 40 share. (In Philadelphia, the numbers were 45.2/60.) So with its team facing Series elimination, not even half of the home market that was watching television could be bothered to flip the channel to check out the game. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/mediumwell)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.