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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
High school carpentry courses have given Paul "Pasha" Lippincott the skills to build a deck and a fence at his Towson home and the confidence to move ahead with a floor-to-ceiling renovation of the family kitchen. While completing his senior year and planning to pursue construction management in college, he also has gathered enough know-how and aplomb to demonstrate basic do-it-yourself tasks on BCPS-TV. The senior at George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology just taped a segment for "So Easy a Kid Can Do It," a series that debuted Monday on the county schools' cable television channel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The decades-long decline in lead-poisoned children in Maryland has essentially stalled, but state officials said Thursday they are taking steps in the coming months to address gaps in the marathon effort to eliminate the environmental health threat. Statewide, 2,622 youngsters up to age 6 were found to have harmful levels of lead in their blood last year, according to an annual report just released by the Maryland Department of the Environment. That's down 4 percent from 2012, though the number of children with seriously elevated lead levels grew slightly, from 364 to 371. Exposure to even minute amounts of lead can harm still-developing brains and nervous systems of young children, leading to learning and behavioral problems.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | January 4, 1992
The field of home improvement is influenced so strongly by history, by personal preference and by available technology that no one ever has the last word.Virtually every month brings a new crop of home how-to books and manuals. What follows are brief reviews of some we've seen lately that we like. Each of them is sure to please someone and some of them should please just about everybody who has an interest in how houses work.The prime entry in the latter category is an update of an old friend, "The Reader's Digest New Complete Do-It-Yourself Manual."
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 30, 2014
Do-not-call violations and telemarketing abuses ranked as the fastest-growing consumer complaints last year, according to a report released Wednesday. Three Maryland agencies participated in the annual survey by the Consumer Federation of America and the North American Consumer Protection Investigators. The survey compiled the top, worst and fastest-growing complaints. The Howard County Office of Consumer Affairs, the Maryland Attorney General's Office and the Montgomery County Office of Consumer Protection were among 43 agencies from 23 states that responded.
FEATURES
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Pop quiz: What's the home-improvement project that comes closest to paying for itself when you sell? Not a snazzy new kitchen or bathroom. A lowly steel front door. So says Remodeling magazine in its annual survey breaking down the cost benefits of spiffing up your home. In the Baltimore metro area, the survey says, replacing your door costs about $1,120 and has a resale value of $1,040. "That's the entrance of the home," said Dave MacLean, director of sales at Brothers Services Co., a Hampstead-based remodeling firm.
BUSINESS
By Jube Shiver Jr. and Jube Shiver Jr.,Los Angeles Times | May 3, 1992
After spending six years sharing a bathroom with his wife and two children, salesman John Brummelcamp is adding a second bath and two bedrooms to his two-bedroom Southern California home.His monthly mortgage will rise by $300 as a result of the $50,000 equity loan he took out to finance the 800-square-foot addition. But that's only a third of the increase had he bought a bigger house."The dollars and cents pointed us in this direction," he said. "It really doesn't make financial sense to move."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | October 30, 1994
When Valley Brook Community Church's executive pastor, the Rev. Rob Lamp, talks to his congregation today, he won't just speak as a minister. He'll be doing a comedy routine.Mr. Lamp will imitate comedian Tim Allen, star of ABC's hit show "Home Improvement," at a kickoff service for the congregation's four-week family series also titled "Home Improvement"."We're going to do a little spoof on it [the show]. I'm going to be your host Tim Allen," said Mr. Lamp, who has helped produce the church's annual Christmas program and other productions.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | June 28, 1998
OF ALL THE materials that will go into your home improvement project, the one that's most important is made of paper.It's the contract, and it puts into writing exactly what you and your contractor are agreeing to. The contractor agrees to build something, and you agree to pay for it.It sounds simple. He agrees to remodel a bath, you agree to pay for it. But the contract is where your expectations and his actions are placed in sync.A surprising number of people start remodeling projects with little or nothing in writing.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | August 1, 1995
If you want a good idea of what yesterday's $19 billion Disney acquisition of Capital Cities/ABC Inc. will mean for television viewers, tune in to WMAR (Channel 2) at 9 tonight for Tim Allen's "Home Improvement."The series, TV's highest-rated sitcom, suggests both the synergy that makes this an obvious media marriage, as well as one of the main paths the Disney-owned ABC television network is expected to travel.As ABC Entertainment president Ted Harbert puts it, "ABC's comedy shows, like 'Home Improvement,' are made for America's families."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 23, 1997
The seventh season of "Home Improvement" (9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) opens with what the writers hope will be a new source of merriment for ensuing episodes: Tim's mid-life crisis.Having run smack-dab into middle age, Tim (Tim Allen) is acting a little odd of late: using foreign phrases, talking about existentialism and promising to spring a "surprise" on his family when they take their annual vacation in the woods. The "surprise" doesn't sit all that well with Jill (Patricia Richardson)
FEATURES
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Home improvement projects can easily cost tens of thousands of dollars, which means the stakes are high if something goes wrong. And things do. Maryland regulators received more than 4,400 complaints about home improvement contractors in the last three fiscal years, ranging from disputes about the scope of the project to no work performed at all. The Maryland Home Improvement Commission, which offers a program where homeowners can be reimbursed some...
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
A 98-year-old woman was attacked at her home Saturday by a man claiming to be selling home improvement services, Baltimore County police said. Police on Tuesday said they are looking for 50-year-old Paul Earnest Howard Jr., of no fixed address, and have an arrest warrant for him in connection with the assault. The county fire department got a medical alert call at 7:46 p.m. Saturday to the home in the 200 block of Gaywood Road, where they found the victim lying on the floor inside.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Arthur F. Jenkins, former owner of a home improvement and construction company, died Saturday of pancreatitis at Shore Medical Center in Somers Point, N.J. He was 51. The son of T. Courtenay Jenkins Jr., owner of the Falls Road Corp., and Muffie Jenkins, Arthur Foster Jenkins was born in Baltimore and raised in Glyndon on his grandfather's farm, which was known as Foster's Mushroom Farm. Mr. Jenkins attended Gilman School and graduated in 1980 from Trinity-Pawling School in Pawling, N.Y. He attended Washington College and Towson University.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Home improvement shows are a mixed blessing, says Kent Drinker of Timberlake Building & Renovations. Drinker speaks from experience. The Annapolis-based project and client relations manager had his brush with television when his company was featured on a recent episode of HGTV's "Bang for Your Buck. " Although he hasn't seen a major effect on his business after the show aired in May, he says the industry has definitely been affected by images, trends and projects seen on home improvement shows.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Erika Brannock is still adjusting to life with new physical challenges after the Boston Marathon bombing, but she now has a fully accessible bathroom, thanks to renovations by the Freemasons of Maryland. Brannock, whose left leg was amputated above the knee, said the renovations have allowed her to regain some independence. "When you have a life-altering change like this, you really need something that makes you feel more normal, and you guys have made me feel more normal. Thank you," Brannock told Grand Master Jerry Piepiora and Bob Knight, the Timonium contractor who coordinated donations.
FEATURES
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Pop quiz: What's the home-improvement project that comes closest to paying for itself when you sell? Not a snazzy new kitchen or bathroom. A lowly steel front door. So says Remodeling magazine in its annual survey breaking down the cost benefits of spiffing up your home. In the Baltimore metro area, the survey says, replacing your door costs about $1,120 and has a resale value of $1,040. "That's the entrance of the home," said Dave MacLean, director of sales at Brothers Services Co., a Hampstead-based remodeling firm.
NEWS
July 13, 2006
Sidney F. Harrison Jr., who ran a home improvement business and liked motorcycles, died in a motorcycle accident July 4 in Loudon County, Tenn. He was 38. Mr. Harrison's residence was in White Marsh, but he had been living in Madisonville, Tenn., where he and his wife were building a house. He was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated in 1986 from Polytechnic Institute. After graduation, he worked for several construction companies, then for FedEx for at least 10 years in Baltimore County before starting his business, which he ran out of his home in White Marsh.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
James E. Johnston, a retired Navy Department worker who also maintained a home-improvement business, died Sunday of cancer at FutureCare Lochearn. The longtime Northwest Baltimore resident was 88. Born and raised in Roanoke Rapids, N.C., James Eugene Johnston was the son of a seamstress. His father died when he was 5, family members said. After graduating in 1942 from McIver High School in Roanoke Rapids, Mr. Johnston enlisted in the Army. He served as a cook, and after being discharged in 1944, remained an active reservist for six years.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
We frequently complain about big government but sometimes they can be very helpful. The following represents a case where the Maryland state government was very helpful to me. During the month of March 2012, I had a nationally known company perform repair work on my home. Unfortunately the work was performed in an unsatisfactory way and after months of dealing with the company we could not reach a resolution. I felt the company was not negotiating in good faith, so I contacted the Maryland Home Improvement Commission for assistance.
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