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By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1994
When Violet Whoolery took a nasty tumble down her front steps in October and broke her back, her family thought that she might have to abandon her Brooklyn Park home for a health care facility.But last week, the 79-year-old was in her bed at her home on Cresswell Road in Anne Arundel County, surrounded by family photos and cards. A nurse cared for her as her two daughters looked on and her great-grandchildren played in another room.Harbor Hospital Center's Home Health Agency program allowed Mrs. Whoolery's family to keep her at home.
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NEWS
June 30, 2014
The Supreme Court didn't kill a key underpinning of public sector unionism Monday, but it surely put it on life support. The court's ruling in the Illinois case Harris v. Quinn, which related to the mandatory collection of so-called "fair share" fees from home health care workers whose wages are negotiated by a union whether those workers choose to belong to the union or not, was a relatively narrow one. It turned on the court's decision to draw a...
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | December 9, 1990
Marlene Kvichak keeps a bag of peppermints stashed in the car, just in case she needs a pick-me-up on one of her Jack Kerouac days.She doesn't hitchhike, but Kvichak spends a lot of time on the road. And she never knows when she might wind up in a traffic jam, staring hungrily at the golden arches.Shuttling from one homebound patient to another, the 39-year-old visiting nurse with the county health department has logged plenty of miles on her state-owned car and learned to navigate the back roads of North County.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | May 16, 2013
Editor: As summer approaches, many high school students are getting ready to graduate and head off to colleges across the nation. As a soon to graduate college student, who attended our own Fallston High School, I would like to suggest a major that is little known but highly rewarding: occupational therapy.  Occupational therapy was established as a profession in 1917 and has continued to grow to this day. Occupational therapists work with...
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- At a time when most of the momentum around health care reform seems to be directed toward slowing down and trimming back the costs of the new insurance program, a consensus is quietly building for one expensive new benefit.Home health care coverage for the elderly and disabled, which only recently seemed like a luxury Congress could not afford, is now given a reasonable chance of being included in some form in the version of the health care bill that comes up for a final vote this fall.
NEWS
By Staff report | November 4, 1990
Transportation, home health care and employment are expected to be the main areas of interest at a public hearing this week sponsored by the Howard County Commission on Disability Issues.The seven-member commission, which advises the county executive and county council on disability issues, will consider information from the hearing as they develop a work plan for the coming year, said Ann Wicke, the commission's executive secretary.The hearing will begin at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Maryland School for the Deaf on Route 108 at Old Montgomery Road.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
Eleven small Maryland home health agencies are banding together to bid for managed-care contracts in an effort to improve their ability to compete.The home health care companies, eight based at hospitals, collectively do about $20 million in business annually and serve about 9,000 patients. The group, incorporated this week as the Maryland Home Health Network Inc., is the single largest home health care provider in the state.But members say the attraction for managed-care companies is the network's geographic reach, not its size.
NEWS
December 17, 2006
Theresa M. Alexander, a home health care worker who grew up in Northwest Baltimore, died Dec. 8 of a heart attack in her Bolton Hill apartment. 8. She was 85. Born Theresa Maddox in Philadelphia, she moved to Baltimore as a child, said her sister, Victorine Gross-Hall of Randallstown. "We used to sit on the front steps and play hopscotch and jump rope and tag," Mrs. Gross-Hall said. "We would play school and move up the steps when you gave the right answer. You were not afraid to sit on your steps then; your parents were not afraid to have you outside playing."
NEWS
October 15, 2006
Betty J. Hanna, a retired home health care nurse, died of a heart attack Wednesday at her home in Chase. She was 71. Betty J. Gamber was born in Ellicott City, where she grew up in an old house on Tongue Row. She attended Howard County schools and received a General Educational Development certificate in 1976 from the Carroll County public school system. In 1950, she married Donald Voyles, a union that ended in divorce. She wed Lee de Cheubel in 1955. They later divorced. In 2002, she married William H. Hanna, who survives her. A home health nurse for 40 years, Mrs. Hanna also enjoyed making crafts.
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
Manor Care Inc. has taken control of In Home Health Inc., a major supplier of home health care services.The transaction announced yesterday gives Silver Spring-based Manor Care, which specializes in nursing home services, entry into the rapidly expanding home health industry.In Home Health, based in Minneapolis, does business in 13 states and has annual revenues of $130 million. It provides skilled nursing, rehabilitation, personal care and other services to patients in their own homes.Manor Care operates 193 facilities with 26,000 beds in 28 states.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
In July, authorities discovered that a radiology technician who had worked in Maryland and several other states had been injecting himself with narcotics-filled syringes, refilling them with saline and leaving them behind for use on patients. More than 1,700 Marylanders were exposed to hepatitis C as a result, and five contracted the disease. Dozens more were affected in other states. In September, the Maryland health department shut down a Timonium cosmetic surgery center after three patients contracted a dangerous bacterial infection after liposuction.
NEWS
December 1, 2008
Reya Johnson sat in her living room with her 15-month-old daughter Andrea, a bright-eyed child who couldn't stop smiling. They sang nursery rhymes and played pitty-pat, tapping their palms lightly together. Ms. Johnson, 38, was showing Peggy White, a caseworker from Baltimore's Healthy Start initiative, the progress Andrea had made since her last visit. Healthy Start helps pregnant women and new mothers with counseling, medical care and other services. Ms. White watched as Andrea eagerly pretended to read a colorful brochure and recited rhymes with her mother.
NEWS
August 14, 2008
Several of the repeat callers to Baltimore's emergency 911 system haven't called in months. That's because a city health advocacy unit has figured out what ails them and connected them to services that would help them. Why didn't someone think of that before? The chronic problem of repeat callers has taxed the city's 911 response system for years and likely contributed to higher health care costs in Maryland. This year, the Fire Department finally decided to investigate. Of 150,000 annual calls to 911, the department found that 2,000 were made by the same 91 people.
NEWS
By Tram Nguyen | December 30, 2007
Here's a New Year's wish: Pay the people who care for our loved ones at home a decent wage. They change bedpans, tend bedsores, give baths, do laundry and make the meals. They also provide much-needed companionship and even basic medical treatment. Without the contributions of home care workers, life would be that much harder for 13 million aging, chronically ill or disabled Americans and their families. But for all they provide, home care aides get short shrift. They make an average wage of $8 an hour, often with no benefits.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | August 15, 2007
Without fanfare, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed executive orders this month giving collective bargaining rights to home health aides and child care workers whose pay is subsidized by the state, despite the General Assembly's rejection of those proposals. In the orders, O'Malley said home health aides -- who provide services for disabled Marylanders through the Medicaid program -- often earn low pay, with few benefits or opportunities for training. And the child care work force, he wrote, needs to be stabilized and have a collective voice.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2007
Awards Travelers Cos. presented Albert "Skip" Counselman, chairman and chief executive officer of Riggs, Counselman, Michaels & Downes, with its inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award. Rose Wang, president and chief executive officer of Bethesda-based Binary Group, received a leadership award in the entrepreneur category from Women In Technology. Openings Amedisys Home Health Care of Glen Burnie, which provides home health and hospice services, opened an office at 100 West Road in Towson.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Medicare spending on home health agencies and nursing homes has skyrocketed in the past five years, and Congress and the Clinton administration have decided that they must control those costs as part of any plan to balance the federal budget.Home health care is one of the fastest-growing benefits in the Medicare program, and Medicare, in turn, is the largest purchaser of home health services in the United States.Medicare spending for such services, which are provided by nurses, home health aides and therapists, has increased 31 percent a year, to $16.7 billion in 1996 from $3.3 billion in 1990.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Alarmed by runaway costs, the Clinton administration plans to cut back on health care that many elderly Medicare recipients receive at home.The administration's proposed fiscal 1998 budget, to bereleased next month, would place strict new limits on payments for home health care, the fastest-growing part of Medicare. An increasing number of elderly invalids and shut-ins seek nursing care, physical therapy, and help with dressing and bathing at home.Government costs for the care are climbing at 23 percent a year, far exceeding the 9 percent overall growth rate in the total Medicare program.
NEWS
December 17, 2006
Theresa M. Alexander, a home health care worker who grew up in Northwest Baltimore, died Dec. 8 of a heart attack in her Bolton Hill apartment. 8. She was 85. Born Theresa Maddox in Philadelphia, she moved to Baltimore as a child, said her sister, Victorine Gross-Hall of Randallstown. "We used to sit on the front steps and play hopscotch and jump rope and tag," Mrs. Gross-Hall said. "We would play school and move up the steps when you gave the right answer. You were not afraid to sit on your steps then; your parents were not afraid to have you outside playing."
NEWS
October 15, 2006
Betty J. Hanna, a retired home health care nurse, died of a heart attack Wednesday at her home in Chase. She was 71. Betty J. Gamber was born in Ellicott City, where she grew up in an old house on Tongue Row. She attended Howard County schools and received a General Educational Development certificate in 1976 from the Carroll County public school system. In 1950, she married Donald Voyles, a union that ended in divorce. She wed Lee de Cheubel in 1955. They later divorced. In 2002, she married William H. Hanna, who survives her. A home health nurse for 40 years, Mrs. Hanna also enjoyed making crafts.
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