Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHome Farm
IN THE NEWS

Home Farm

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | February 27, 2012
Back in 1988, newlyweds and Harford County natives Paula and Tom Harman decided they wanted to grow two acres of sweet corn and about 50 tomato plants on their home farm in Churchville. The fruits of their labor were more than two people could eat, so they set up a little cart along the side of the road. “We sold corn and tomatoes. Unbelievably, people came to us,” says Paula. “Each year after that, we grew a little bit more and expanded the variety of what we grew.” Thus, Harman's Farm Market was born.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | February 27, 2012
Back in 1988, newlyweds and Harford County natives Paula and Tom Harman decided they wanted to grow two acres of sweet corn and about 50 tomato plants on their home farm in Churchville. The fruits of their labor were more than two people could eat, so they set up a little cart along the side of the road. “We sold corn and tomatoes. Unbelievably, people came to us,” says Paula. “Each year after that, we grew a little bit more and expanded the variety of what we grew.” Thus, Harman's Farm Market was born.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
In many ways, John T. Mayer doesn't fit the stereotypical profile of a dairy farmer.A 1983 graduate of what now is Frostburg State University with degrees in economics and business administration, Mr. Mayer -- who just won the Atlantic Dairy Cooperative's Outstanding Young Cooperator title with his wife, Julie -- grew up in suburban Damascus.His father still owns and operates a sign company near College Park. His mother is a retired government accountant.But dairy farming and a determination to succeed are in his blood.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2003
The 140 deer that live on Blandair wander freely on the 300-acre future park in the center of suburban Columbia, even crossing busy Route 175 in bunches, according to hunters who have seen their tracks. But without natural predators, they have been eating up to 20 percent of the feed corn that farmer Mark Mullinix grows on rented fields on the Blandair property along Oakland Mills Road. So Howard County has applied for a state permit to send in experienced bowhunters to thin the pesky herd.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | March 10, 1991
Turning a 360-acre South Carroll farm into a community of 108 luxuryhomes and an 18-hole golf course could generate more than $8.2 million in taxes for Carroll County over the next 20 years.But development on the Eldersburg farm of Claude R., Edwin E. and Glen I. Rash -- the subject of a four-hour public hearing last week -- would bring with it more traffic, more schoolchildren and the possibility of increased water and soil runoff, opponents say.The Rashes and Montgomery County-based Woodfield Partnership havebeen trying for three years to find a way to change the zoning of the parcel from agricultural to a combination of R-40,000 and conservation.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
William and Henry Boyer hadn't walked down Boyer Road in years.Their old family homes are long gone, even the barns and other outbuildings. The picnic area along Boyer Beach is gone, too. Almost every sign of the once-proud Boyer Farm has vanished, or been destroyed by vandals.But when William, 74, and Henry, 69, tromped through the old farm last week they could still see it all: the fine old brick home their grandfather, Henry Boyer, built in 1905 for $15,000; the barns, and outbuildings and tenant houses.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
The county Board of Appeals has granted a Millersville couple's request to double the number of homes they may build on their farm off East-West Boulevard.The board voted 3-2 to change the zoning on 41.44 acres owned by Ralph and Norma Darley from R1 to R2, paving the way for a 67-house community to be built by Ryland Group Inc.The board's decision has incensed nearby residents and community associations, many of whom question the timing of the case, with a county General Development Plan two years away.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones and Nancy Jones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 1999
Millersville is an unpretentious, quiet area that may have evolved into a commuter's paradise.Amid the farms, residents can easily reach such connectors as Interstate 97, Generals Highway, Route 32 and Route 175."It's so convenient. It's right between Baltimore and Annapolis and not very far from Washington, D.C. You have the airport nearby and even have the water nearby. It has a little of a lot of things," said Shellie Seyer, manager of the Long and Foster Real Estate Inc. office in Odenton.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1997
On one side of the border sits some of the Baltimore region's most treasured farmland -- rolling grainfields and pastures, cut by curving country roads and by Piney Run as it flows toward the Loch Raven Reservoir.On the other side stand the sprawling Roberts Field Shopping Center and housing developments of pastel colonials, duplexes and townhouses.The sharp contrasts along the border between Baltimore and Carroll counties have triggered conflicts among residents of new subdivisions and those who live in rural communities.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2003
The 140 deer that live on Blandair wander freely on the 300-acre future park in the center of suburban Columbia, even crossing busy Route 175 in bunches, according to hunters who have seen their tracks. But without natural predators, they have been eating up to 20 percent of the feed corn that farmer Mark Mullinix grows on rented fields on the Blandair property along Oakland Mills Road. So Howard County has applied for a state permit to send in experienced bowhunters to thin the pesky herd.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones and Nancy Jones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 1999
Millersville is an unpretentious, quiet area that may have evolved into a commuter's paradise.Amid the farms, residents can easily reach such connectors as Interstate 97, Generals Highway, Route 32 and Route 175."It's so convenient. It's right between Baltimore and Annapolis and not very far from Washington, D.C. You have the airport nearby and even have the water nearby. It has a little of a lot of things," said Shellie Seyer, manager of the Long and Foster Real Estate Inc. office in Odenton.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1997
On one side of the border sits some of the Baltimore region's most treasured farmland -- rolling grainfields and pastures, cut by curving country roads and by Piney Run as it flows toward the Loch Raven Reservoir.On the other side stand the sprawling Roberts Field Shopping Center and housing developments of pastel colonials, duplexes and townhouses.The sharp contrasts along the border between Baltimore and Carroll counties have triggered conflicts among residents of new subdivisions and those who live in rural communities.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
The county Board of Appeals has granted a Millersville couple's request to double the number of homes they may build on their farm off East-West Boulevard.The board voted 3-2 to change the zoning on 41.44 acres owned by Ralph and Norma Darley from R1 to R2, paving the way for a 67-house community to be built by Ryland Group Inc.The board's decision has incensed nearby residents and community associations, many of whom question the timing of the case, with a county General Development Plan two years away.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
William and Henry Boyer hadn't walked down Boyer Road in years.Their old family homes are long gone, even the barns and other outbuildings. The picnic area along Boyer Beach is gone, too. Almost every sign of the once-proud Boyer Farm has vanished, or been destroyed by vandals.But when William, 74, and Henry, 69, tromped through the old farm last week they could still see it all: the fine old brick home their grandfather, Henry Boyer, built in 1905 for $15,000; the barns, and outbuildings and tenant houses.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
In many ways, John T. Mayer doesn't fit the stereotypical profile of a dairy farmer.A 1983 graduate of what now is Frostburg State University with degrees in economics and business administration, Mr. Mayer -- who just won the Atlantic Dairy Cooperative's Outstanding Young Cooperator title with his wife, Julie -- grew up in suburban Damascus.His father still owns and operates a sign company near College Park. His mother is a retired government accountant.But dairy farming and a determination to succeed are in his blood.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | March 10, 1991
Turning a 360-acre South Carroll farm into a community of 108 luxuryhomes and an 18-hole golf course could generate more than $8.2 million in taxes for Carroll County over the next 20 years.But development on the Eldersburg farm of Claude R., Edwin E. and Glen I. Rash -- the subject of a four-hour public hearing last week -- would bring with it more traffic, more schoolchildren and the possibility of increased water and soil runoff, opponents say.The Rashes and Montgomery County-based Woodfield Partnership havebeen trying for three years to find a way to change the zoning of the parcel from agricultural to a combination of R-40,000 and conservation.
NEWS
January 19, 1992
Amusement park sought for RehobothA Rehoboth Beach businessman has proposed building an amusement park on 96 acres on the outskirts of the resort.However, the proposal is strongly opposed by the state Transportation Department, which says traffic conditions would worsen on an already over-stressed section of Route 1 near the proposed site.The Sussex County Council will have the final say on the proposal. Public hearings have not been scheduled.Ronald E. Lankford is proposing the park on land known locally as the "Dodd home farm," behind the newest section of the Ocean Outlets shopping center.
NEWS
August 19, 1992
Mollie C. Kirk, several of whose survivors live in Maryland, died Sunday of heart failure at her home farm in Independence, Va., at age 102.Services are set for 3 p.m. today at Gold Hill Baptist Church in that southwestern Virginia community.One of Mrs. Kirk's five surviving children, two of her 12 grandchildren and one of her five great-grandchildren live in Maryland.Born in 1890 in Bridle Creek, Va., the former Mollie C. Phipps attended schools there. She was married in 1917 to C. Mastin Kirk, who died in 1972.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.