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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Two Bhutanese refugees were shot, one of them fatally, in an apparent robbery in Northeast Baltimore, one of two double shootings investigated by Baltimore police Tuesday night. Big Bahadur Gurung, 20, had emigrated two months ago, after being given sanctuary following years of persecution in his home country, said Holly Leon-Lierman, the outreach manager for the International Rescue Committee, which helps refugees assimilate. "He came here seeking freedom and safety," Leon-Lierman said.
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NEWS
August 24, 2014
At least five undocumented immigrants U.S. officials recently deported back to their homes in Honduras turned up dead at the morgue in San Pedro Sula, the Los Angeles Times reported . According to other news accounts, the victims ranged in age from 12 to 18, and all five had died of gunshot wounds. The director of the morgue speculated the killings were the work of criminal gangs in retribution for the children's refusal to become members or pay protection money to the thugs who terrorized their neighborhood.
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NEWS
June 11, 2014
A proposal earlier this week to provide temporary shelter at a Baltimore City office building for child migrants from Central America who arrive in this country without a parent or guardian appears to have been shelved for the moment, after Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake raised concerns over the facility's appropriateness. Metro West is an empty office building with no infrastructure for residential use. It's not an appropriate residence for potentially hundreds of children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Marcelo Salles' food truck is getting a little more attention now that all eyes are on the World Cup games. But despite the fact that Brazilian culture is in the spotlight, Salles is not convinced that Baltimoreans are ready to embrace what is standard fare in his home country: chicken hearts. So his truck, called Darua, instead serves other classic Brazilian dishes like feijoada , a hearty stew of black beans and meats, and pastel , fried dough pockets with sweet and savory fillings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Marcelo Salles' food truck is getting a little more attention now that all eyes are on the World Cup games. But despite the fact that Brazilian culture is in the spotlight, Salles is not convinced that Baltimoreans are ready to embrace what is standard fare in his home country: chicken hearts. So his truck, called Darua, instead serves other classic Brazilian dishes like feijoada , a hearty stew of black beans and meats, and pastel , fried dough pockets with sweet and savory fillings.
FEATURES
By Rosemary Knower | September 11, 1991
ONE OF THE THINGS I LOVE ABOUT GOING SOUTH EVERY SUM- mer is the vegetables. In little restaurants -- often with "Family" appended to their titles -- you find glorious buffets of food that are the apotheosis of old-fashioned Sunday suppers marking the end of summer's bounty.It is the American Southern version of "peasant cuisine": crisp fried okra; thick, crimson slices of ripe tomato; country ham and grits with red eye gravy; green and seven other kinds of beans from lima to black-eyed peas; corn; collards; kale and turnip greens steamed gently in big steel servers.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
When Maryland National Guardsman William D. Crosby Sr. first heard about the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, he knew right away that he would volunteer to help his fellow guardsmen in New York. But within the hour, five hijackers had crashed a jetliner into the Pentagon, and Crosby suspected he'd have orders of his own. He was right. The Randallstown man was among the several hundred Maryland Guardsmen federalized and dispatched Sept. 12 to Northern Virginia to guard the crime scene at the Pentagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Howard Cohen and Howard Cohen,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 29, 2004
It's been no secret among Parrotheads that Jimmy Buffett's last batch of albums -- Banana Wind, Beach House on the Moon, Far Side of the World -- have been well-crafted but interchangeable and, ultimately, forgettable. The less devoted would say that complaint could stretch as far back as any of his post-Coconut Telegraph (1981) recordings. It also hasn't gone unnoticed that Buffett has had a profound influence on today's country stars, some of whom (especially Kenny Chesney) slavishly copy the chief Parrot's sound and look.
FEATURES
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | January 14, 1996
Forecasting home-fashion trends is always a dicey bit of business. So predicting that country-style decorating is about to make a run for the border amounts to little more than crawling out on a shaky limb of limited length.Still, it does seem that in the coming months and years, the United States increasingly will be looking to Mexico and points south for country-casual inspiration.This is a movement that matters, because it represents the continued evolution of country style. It gives those who have a penchant for casual decorating based on rural values and sentiments a way to update, adapt and integrate fresh, new elements and to customize and personalize their homes with new ingredients.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Contributing writer | October 13, 1991
If you'd like to put the warmth of country decor in your kitchen, family room, or throughout your entire home, you can use some simple, inexpensive alternatives to the usual duck-duck-goose approach to country decorating.First impressions are often lasting, and a visitor's first impression of your home begins at your front door. A welcomechange from beribboned straw wreaths are sculpted metal shapes of elephants, whales and pigs -- lined with bells -- that jingle every time there's a knock on the door.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
A proposal earlier this week to provide temporary shelter at a Baltimore City office building for child migrants from Central America who arrive in this country without a parent or guardian appears to have been shelved for the moment, after Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake raised concerns over the facility's appropriateness. Metro West is an empty office building with no infrastructure for residential use. It's not an appropriate residence for potentially hundreds of children.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
An MS-13 gang member wanted in Honduras in the killing of a man with a machete was arrested Monday at his home in Randallstown, federal authorities announced. Oscar Orlando Amador Centeno, 29, had previously been deported in January 2010 for illegally entering the country, and officials say that in July 2010 he struck a man three times with a machete on a soccer field in Olancho, Honduras, and stole his wallet. Amador Centeno re-entered the country at an unknown time and began living in Randallstown.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Two Bhutanese refugees were shot, one of them fatally, in an apparent robbery in Northeast Baltimore, one of two double shootings investigated by Baltimore police Tuesday night. Big Bahadur Gurung, 20, had emigrated two months ago, after being given sanctuary following years of persecution in his home country, said Holly Leon-Lierman, the outreach manager for the International Rescue Committee, which helps refugees assimilate. "He came here seeking freedom and safety," Leon-Lierman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Howard Cohen and Howard Cohen,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 29, 2004
It's been no secret among Parrotheads that Jimmy Buffett's last batch of albums -- Banana Wind, Beach House on the Moon, Far Side of the World -- have been well-crafted but interchangeable and, ultimately, forgettable. The less devoted would say that complaint could stretch as far back as any of his post-Coconut Telegraph (1981) recordings. It also hasn't gone unnoticed that Buffett has had a profound influence on today's country stars, some of whom (especially Kenny Chesney) slavishly copy the chief Parrot's sound and look.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
When Maryland National Guardsman William D. Crosby Sr. first heard about the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, he knew right away that he would volunteer to help his fellow guardsmen in New York. But within the hour, five hijackers had crashed a jetliner into the Pentagon, and Crosby suspected he'd have orders of his own. He was right. The Randallstown man was among the several hundred Maryland Guardsmen federalized and dispatched Sept. 12 to Northern Virginia to guard the crime scene at the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2000
Although Clarksville is growing at a ferocious pace with subdivisions and shops springing up all over the place, dining opportunities are still rather limited. That's one of the reasons you'll find a line of diners waiting outside El Azteca Mexican restaurant in the Clarksville Center shopping strip on weekends. Another reason may be the authentic Mexican cuisine served in this small and family-friendly restaurant. Owners Gilberto and Francisca Cortes have seen a lot of changes in Clarksville since their restaurant opened in 1992.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
Like dozens of refugees before him, Jean Marie Siewe went to the comforting environs of Karen Hanscom's office and told a story of torture. The 25-year-old native of Cameroon smiled as he spoke, the better to hide his fear and shame. But Hanscom, a psychotherapist who has been treating refugees such as Siewe, detected the signs of post-traumatic stress syndrome and depression -- as apparent to her as the acid scars on Siewe's arm and the cuts on his legs. Hanscom counsels refugees in her role as executive director of a nascent organization called Advocates for Survivors of Trauma and Torture -- a network of professionals treating the unseen maladies of the Baltimore-Washington area's increasingly diverse population of refugees.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
An MS-13 gang member wanted in Honduras in the killing of a man with a machete was arrested Monday at his home in Randallstown, federal authorities announced. Oscar Orlando Amador Centeno, 29, had previously been deported in January 2010 for illegally entering the country, and officials say that in July 2010 he struck a man three times with a machete on a soccer field in Olancho, Honduras, and stole his wallet. Amador Centeno re-entered the country at an unknown time and began living in Randallstown.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
Like dozens of refugees before him, Jean Marie Siewe went to the comforting environs of Karen Hanscom's office and told a story of torture. The 25-year-old native of Cameroon smiled as he spoke, the better to hide his fear and shame. But Hanscom, a psychotherapist who has been treating refugees such as Siewe, detected the signs of post-traumatic stress syndrome and depression -- as apparent to her as the acid scars on Siewe's arm and the cuts on his legs. Hanscom counsels refugees in her role as executive director of a nascent organization called Advocates for Survivors of Trauma and Torture -- a network of professionals treating the unseen maladies of the Baltimore-Washington area's increasingly diverse population of refugees.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
KUTZTOWN, Pa. -- The conversation took place two weeks ago, during the third round of the LPGA's Safeco Classic near Seattle. Hall of Famer Patty Sheehan was trying to get Se Ri Pak's mind off the misery of having made three straight double bogeys on the front nine."
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