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By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff | February 17, 1999
Now that many of your New Year's resolutions have vanished into the oblivion of good intentions, it's time to tackle the one that really matters -- the 1999 Declaration of the Stomach.You know, a pledge to return to real food for dinner in a move toward culinary independence. The vow that lets you jettison the grocer's gooey rotisserie bird and skip those frozen microwave feasts.With this promise, you are determined to return to the kitchen, a place where turning out easy, healthy dishes -- even in the midst of the daily rush -- becomes fun again.
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HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Around 3 billion people worldwide cook in their homes over fires fueled by everything from wood and eucalyptus leaves to dried cow dung and quinoa and every year, the World Health Organization estimates, 4 million people die because of the smoke. The problem is the smoke from many home cooking fires is not properly vented outside. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is working to develop a safer way to cook for more than half of the world's population. The project aims to decrease the amount of harmful smoke residents of rural communities can be exposed to using cookstoves in thatched huts with little ventilation.
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FEATURES
By William Rice and William Rice,Chicago Tribune | April 27, 1994
Helen Chen is heir to a weighty culinary legacy. Her mother, Joyce Chen, was a pioneer in bringing Chinese cooking into American kitchens.Now Helen has taken up the cause of making us more conversant in the techniques and tastes of this most sophisticated Asian cuisine. Her teaching tool is an informative new book, "Helen Chen's Home Cooking" (Hearst Books, $25).The book is a personal account of experiences in the kitchen, with her mother and on her own. Most important, she holds to her promise to present "simple, home-style Chinese food."
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 4, 2013
The U.S. Naval Academy is its own kind of "Suitcase College. " Midshipmen on the walled off campus are always looking for a way to escape - not the boredom, but the unending pressure. One of the ways they can escape is to the home of a "sponsor family," residents in and around Annapolis who volunteer to be the home away from home for young men and women just looking for a nap, some TV time, a chance to call home and maybe some home cooking. A place away from Bancroft Hall and the Yard.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | April 10, 1996
Greco show is among the toast of food TV"Country Inn Cooking with Gail Greco," a production of Maryland Public Television, has been nominated for a James Beard Foundation Award for best television food journalism. Winners of the awards will be announced April 29 in New York. Something different for dinner? Sample one of the Wednesday evening mini-courses at Baltimore International Culinary College, such as Korean "Down Home" Cooking (April 24) or Sizzling Salsas and Summer Side Dishes (May 15)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Libby H. Younglove, a homemaker and longtime Baltimore Symphony Orchestra volunteer, died Monday from osteogenic sarcoma at her summer home in Ocean City . She was 66. The former Libby Jean Hale was born and raised in Cockeysville. After graduating from Dulaney High School in 1965, she attended the University of Maryland, College Park for two years. She was married in 1967 to Robert A. Younglove, who owns a performance coaching consulting firm. The couple have lived for many years at Ruxton Crossing in Towson.
NEWS
By Amy Culbertson and Amy Culbertson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 12, 2005
Southern cooks used to say that you should be able to carry a waffle on a pin. What that means is that the waffle should have a super-crisp exterior and a light, fluffy interior. Cooks Illustrated magazine founder Christopher Kimball describes the perfect waffle as "like a just-cooked souffle encased in a flavorful crust." How to achieve that ideal? Here are some tips, from Kimball's The Cook's Bible: The Best of American Home Cooking (Little, Brown, $29.95) and other experts: Butter or oil is essential to achieving a crisp crust, so it's not advisable to try to reduce the fat in most waffle recipes.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2001
HOME COOKING IS what Charles "Mike" Keating loves to do. If he's at home, he's cooking. If he's in your home, he's cooking, too. He is a personal chef, for hire - to plan and execute a top-notch menu for two weeks, perfecting every detail in a client's home. "The only way they know you've been there is the aroma," Keating said. His passion for simmer and saute started as a child in a busy home kitchen. "I grew up with nine brothers and sisters, and we didn't have television back then," he said.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | December 29, 1991
Home-style cooking falls into line with the continuing cocooning trend. At its best, home-style food offers comfort, enjoyment in the cooking and relief from too much restaurant fare."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
Chef Michel Tersiguel of Tersiguel's in Ellicott City is the son of French-born restaurateurs, a guy who didn't get his first taste of peanut butter and jelly until high school. So when he cooks at home, you might expect it to be an elaborate affair. Guess again. "Michel will eat anything -- hot dogs, fine: macaroni and cheese out of a box, fine," said Tersiguel's wife, Angela, who is expecting the couple's second child in December. Turns out that when Tersiguel summered as a child in France, he couldn't wait to get home to a cheesesteak sub. "When I was a kid, I used to eat filet mignon two times a week and to this day, I'm not that crazy about it," he said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Libby H. Younglove, a homemaker and longtime Baltimore Symphony Orchestra volunteer, died Monday from osteogenic sarcoma at her summer home in Ocean City . She was 66. The former Libby Jean Hale was born and raised in Cockeysville. After graduating from Dulaney High School in 1965, she attended the University of Maryland, College Park for two years. She was married in 1967 to Robert A. Younglove, who owns a performance coaching consulting firm. The couple have lived for many years at Ruxton Crossing in Towson.
NEWS
dsturm@tribune.com | April 24, 2013
Not only is Patsy Cline's 1962 hit "Crazy" among the choices on the little jukeboxes perched on the wall at the Bel-Loc Diner's booths, the country singer with the smooth, sultry voice once ate there. So have singer Brenda Lee and comedian Redd Foxx. The Baltimore Colts legendary quarterback Johnny Unitas was known to drop in as well, and Orioles "Iron Man" Cal Ripken Jr. once graciously signed autographs during a meal. "He (Ripken) tipped pretty well," waitress Rachel Fisher recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
A number of years ago a serious chef, baker and food writer named Beth Hensperger got an assignment from her publisher: A slow-cooker cookbook. She declined. More than once. Vehemently. "I was like, 'Oh my God … It doesn't fit in with my style of living,'" says the woman with her James Beard award and California cooking pedigree. "It was not an easy match for me. " But Hensperger eventually did it, releasing, "Not Your Mother's Slow Cooker Cookbook," followed with five sequels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
Chef Michel Tersiguel of Tersiguel's in Ellicott City is the son of French-born restaurateurs, a guy who didn't get his first taste of peanut butter and jelly until high school. So when he cooks at home, you might expect it to be an elaborate affair. Guess again. "Michel will eat anything -- hot dogs, fine: macaroni and cheese out of a box, fine," said Tersiguel's wife, Angela, who is expecting the couple's second child in December. Turns out that when Tersiguel summered as a child in France, he couldn't wait to get home to a cheesesteak sub. "When I was a kid, I used to eat filet mignon two times a week and to this day, I'm not that crazy about it," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
The past is always with us in Baltimore. A native of this town once told me a sure sign that you are a local is when you give directions using landmarks of restaurants that used to be there. As in, "drive down Eastern Avenue until you go past where Haussner's used to be. " That said, CR Lounge still looks like Ixia. Those lofty ceilings, dark-blue walls and gold-leaf columns dominate the decor. And when you are sitting at a table a little beyond the bar you think, 'Isn't this spot where they used to sell magazines when this place was Louie's Cafe and Bookstore?
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Rich Hoffman, a chef-instructor at Baltimore International College, shared some culinary truisms with students in his French cuisine class last week. "Everything's better with bacon. " "Never, ever, ever add alcohol to a pan on an open flame. " And, when marinating chicken pieces in red wine overnight for coq au vin, expect this: "Your chicken is going to turn purple. It's supposed to. Don't freak out. " Hoffman teaches aspiring professional chefs at BIC, but the 30 students in this class were there simply to sharpen their skills as home cooks.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | August 7, 2005
I don't usually review hamburger chains. In fact, in 30-some years of reviewing restaurants I don't think I've ever reviewed a hamburger chain. But Five Guys intrigued me. First of all, the almost local, Alexandria, Va.-based chain has gotten lots of positive press; and it's made a major move into Maryland, with eight places open and many more coming -- all in the past three years. Two particularly high profile locations were planned: the Inner Harbor and the spot on North Charles Street where Nouveau, the home furnishings store, used to be. (It turns out that the Nouveau location isn't going to happen, but the Harborplace Five Guys is up and running.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2004
TOKYO -- Stroll through a depachika, one of the sprawling basement food halls found in Japanese department stores, and you'll encounter a breathtaking display of ready-to-eat items: jewellike salads, tantalizing croquettes, tofu salads, grilled chicken on skewers and other offerings known collectively as sozai. For young working women with little inclination to cook elaborate meals, store-bought sozai is a time-saving grace. Traditionalists, though, say the commercial sozai boom is to blame for the vanishing art of home cooking in Japan.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
COLLEGE PARK -It turned out to be the wrong day for Virginia Tech to be playing Maryland, whose fans showed up frantic not only to support their often-undermanned team but also to embrace Gary Williams, its beleaguered coach. From the moment Williams strode onto the court yesterday and pumped his fist at the crowd, Comcast Center was infused with energy. The crowd - including Ravens coach John Harbaugh, who donned a pro-Williams T-shirt - helped pump up the Terps, who responded with an 83-73 victory to square their Atlantic Coast Conference record at 5-5. "They had a greater sense of urgency," Hokies coach Seth Greenberg said of the Terps (16-8)
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