Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHome Construction
IN THE NEWS

Home Construction

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Sales at all three ReStore locations Saturday will support a Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake home under construction in Baltimore's Orchard Ridge community. Shoppers will find a broad selection of quality building materials, appliances, furniture, cabinets, flooring, lighting and plumbing materials at affordable prices. In addition to the regular discounts, the stores are offering 50 percent off all lighting and 20 percent off all donated items. The Dundalk, Pasadena and Halethorpe ReStores will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sales profits enable the local Habitat chapter to continue its affordable homeownership opportunities in the greater Baltimore metropolitan area as well as in Anne Arundel and Howard counties.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 3, 2014
Way back in 1960, Harford County's population was a little more than 76,000, which, presuming an average of four people per house, translates to about 19,000 homes. When the building boom hit Harford County hard in the 1970s and especially the 1980s, local planning offices were issuing upward of 1,500 permits for new houses each year. Relative to what had been on the ground, that's a lot of new construction. In a community of 20,000 houses, 1,500 new ones amounts to about 7.5 percent of what had already been standing before construction started.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 19, 1997
Single-family home construction in the Baltimore region last year was expected to remain about on par with 1995 construction levels, according to the year-end U.S. Housing Markets report.Through November, builders had pulled permits for 8,728 homes, compared with 9,800 permits for the full year in 1995.Baltimore-area developers have been hurt in large part by slow job growth in the region, stated the report, published by the housing research unit of Hanley-Wood Inc., a national publisher of magazines and trade journals for the homebuilding and remodeling industries.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
One of the builders working with Forest City East Baltimore Partnership, the master planner for East Baltimore Development Inc., is holding an open house Sunday so that potential homebuyers can get a feel for residences that they expect to construct in the footprint of the 88-acre urban renewal project near Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Verde Group, a Baltimore-based green builder, plans to sell 25 new homes along East Chase and Mcdonogh streets. The event will offer the opportunity to tour two homes that Verde has already constructed on East Chase Street, said CEO Martin Richardson.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | March 30, 2008
Though an annual report shows that new home construction in Howard County dropped precipitously last year, land-use issues remain a pressing concern among politicians and activists. To be sure, complaints about land-use policy have been somewhat subdued in this period between elections. But the housing slump detailed in the annual county report hasn't completely quieted the conversation. "We have big changes [coming] in Columbia," said Mary Kay Sigaty, a Democrat who represents West Columbia on the County Council.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 17, 2000
WASHINGTON -- U.S. starts of home construction unexpectedly increased last month and permits for new projects climbed to the highest level in a year, suggesting that builders will stay busy in the months ahead even as interest rates rise. Housing starts rose 1.5 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.775 million units after jumping 5.1 percent in December, the Commerce Department said yesterday. January's increase was paced by a 17.7 percent surge in starts of apartment buildings and other multifamily projects.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 3, 2014
Way back in 1960, Harford County's population was a little more than 76,000, which, presuming an average of four people per house, translates to about 19,000 homes. When the building boom hit Harford County hard in the 1970s and especially the 1980s, local planning offices were issuing upward of 1,500 permits for new houses each year. Relative to what had been on the ground, that's a lot of new construction. In a community of 20,000 houses, 1,500 new ones amounts to about 7.5 percent of what had already been standing before construction started.
NEWS
May 20, 1994
In a county where new home construction is often greeted with dismay, the Planning Department's proposal to limit developers to recording 50 lots a year in one subdivision deserves serious consideration. The proposal will not bring growth to a screeching halt, as some county residents hope. But this policy, if put into effect, might prevent some of the runaway growth that has damaged other metropolitan jurisdictions.Under current regulations, developers can record up to 25 lots per quarter -- or 100 a year -- for each subdivision.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1999
A bill that would halt construction of homes in Baltimore County until enough classrooms and parks are built nearby is riddled with loopholes and other problems, community activists and lobbyists charged yesterday. PTA members say developers could easily escape restrictions banning construction near crowded schools. Neighborhood associations say requirements for parks aren't strong enough. And the state's largest homebuilders' group contends the law isn't needed at all, because construction isn't causing school crowding.
BUSINESS
By Jube Shiver Jr. and Jube Shiver Jr.,Los Angeles Times | May 3, 1992
After spending six years sharing a bathroom with his wife and two children, salesman John Brummelcamp is adding a second bath and two bedrooms to his two-bedroom Southern California home.His monthly mortgage will rise by $300 as a result of the $50,000 equity loan he took out to finance the 800-square-foot addition. But that's only a third of the increase had he bought a bigger house."The dollars and cents pointed us in this direction," he said. "It really doesn't make financial sense to move."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Sales at all three ReStore locations Saturday will support a Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake home under construction in Baltimore's Orchard Ridge community. Shoppers will find a broad selection of quality building materials, appliances, furniture, cabinets, flooring, lighting and plumbing materials at affordable prices. In addition to the regular discounts, the stores are offering 50 percent off all lighting and 20 percent off all donated items. The Dundalk, Pasadena and Halethorpe ReStores will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sales profits enable the local Habitat chapter to continue its affordable homeownership opportunities in the greater Baltimore metropolitan area as well as in Anne Arundel and Howard counties.
EXPLORE
By John Culleton | August 18, 2012
I know I've said it before, but it's more true than ever: It's time to revisit the question of Code Home Rule for Carroll County. The Board of County Commissioners can propose such a change, then the voters can approve it in the next general election. Easy as pie. What would this mean? Well, for one thing, all those Carroll County local bills in the State Legislature would no longer have to be submitted. Instead, the commissioners could enact or repeal any bill which applied only to Carroll County.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
The state's top court Thursday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit asking that a building contractor raze the luxury compound he built without permits on an island in the Magothy River. The lawsuit, filed by the Critical Area Commission in 2008, was the first filed under state environmental enforcement measures toughened by legislators only months earlier. They strengthened the law largely in response to the illegal construction on 2-acre Little Dobbins Island. The Court of Appeals said Thursday that the 2008 provisions could not be applied retroactively to the construction by Daryl C. Wagner and his company, DCW Dutchship Island LLC, that was discovered four years before the law took effect.
BUSINESS
By Michael Muskal and Kristina Sherry and Michael Muskal and Kristina Sherry,Tribune Newspapers | July 18, 2009
WASHINGTON - - Construction of new homes and apartments unexpectedly rose by 3.6 percent in June, the Commerce Department announced Friday morning, an indication that the recession-strained sector may be beginning to recover. The department reported that the building of new homes and apartments had increased in a month to a seasonally adjusted rate of 582,000 units. That was slightly higher than what most economists had expected. At the same time, permits to build new privately-owned housing units rose 8.7 percent in June - to 563,000 units - which was well above the expected 1.9-percent rise.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | March 30, 2008
Though an annual report shows that new home construction in Howard County dropped precipitously last year, land-use issues remain a pressing concern among politicians and activists. To be sure, complaints about land-use policy have been somewhat subdued in this period between elections. But the housing slump detailed in the annual county report hasn't completely quieted the conversation. "We have big changes [coming] in Columbia," said Mary Kay Sigaty, a Democrat who represents West Columbia on the County Council.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Lorraine Mirabella and Tricia Bishop and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporters | August 18, 2007
About three years ago, back when the housing boom was still booming, David Fleming and his wife pooled their skills - hers in real estate and his in developing - and launched a building business. They incorporated as Peninsula Building Group, stocked up on land in the Baltimore region and, like many others, built on speculation, confident that they'd find buyers as the houses were finished. Then the housing market slowed. Then the subprime mortgage market for those with shaky credit collapsed.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1994
* First Town Mortgage Corp. said its loan volume in Maryland increased to $270 million in 1993 from $251 million in 1992. Fourth-quarter volume rose 25 percent to $92 million in 1993 from $74 million a year earlier. Based in Secaucus, N.J., First Town has offices in Annapolis, Baltimore, Rockville and Silver Spring.* Harkins Builders Inc. of Silver Spring has been selected by Comprehensive Housing Assistance Inc., or CHAI, an agency of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, to provide preconstruction services and act as general contractor for the Weinberg Gardens at Bedford.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
One of the builders working with Forest City East Baltimore Partnership, the master planner for East Baltimore Development Inc., is holding an open house Sunday so that potential homebuyers can get a feel for residences that they expect to construct in the footprint of the 88-acre urban renewal project near Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Verde Group, a Baltimore-based green builder, plans to sell 25 new homes along East Chase and Mcdonogh streets. The event will offer the opportunity to tour two homes that Verde has already constructed on East Chase Street, said CEO Martin Richardson.
NEWS
by a sun reporter | March 30, 2007
The county's efforts to sustain growth while simultaneously controlling it are succeeding, according to an analysis. While the report also indicates some progress in combating the dearth of homes for moderate- and low-income earners, it also underscores the severity of escalating housing prices, which are increasingly denying many families the chance to live in the county. The 54-page document, prepared by the Department of Planning and Zoning, identifies important shifts in trends as well, although officials believe some may be temporary.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2005
Anne Arundel County is suing a man who, county officials allege, built a large home on an island in the Magothy River without obtaining the necessary permits. Daryl C. Wagner, a Millersville builder, constructed the 3,500- square-foot house on Little Island without any form of county permission, land-use officials say. The lawsuit, filed yesterday, names Wagner and a corporation he formed as defendants. It asks an Anne Arundel Circuit Court judge to order all illegal structures demolished, to order wells and sewer systems sealed and to make the defendant pay for the cost of any legal proceedings.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.