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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
It might not seem to be a bright investment right now, after weeks of seemingly endless clouds and rain, but solar panels are popping up on rooftops all over Maryland. With government help in the form of tax credits and grants, companies making equipment available through long-term lease and economies of scale bringing prices down, the industry is seeing steady and continuing growth in demand for drawing power from the sun. And Maryland is among the states experiencing a rapid expansion, with an increasing number of companies getting into sales, installation and leasing of the panels to homeowners and businesses.
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BUSINESS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant shut down on Tuesday evening following an electric malfunction. The outage, which occurred at around 9:25 p.m., resulted from a breakdown on the non-nuclear side of the Calvert County facility, according to a news release. Electric service to regional homes and businesses are not expected to be affected as backup power systems are in place. In an email, Calvert Cliffs spokesman Kory Raftery said the plant is in stable condition and there is no threat to public health and safety due to the shutdown.
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
In a move decried by community activists, the Baltimore County Planning Board yesterday took steps to lift outdated, rarely enforced prohibitions against telecommuters, artisans, Avon ladies and others who work at home.The vote came after more than a year of trying to craft legislation that would address the realities of today's business world while protecting neighborhoods from traffic, noise and commercialism.The legislation will go to the County Council, which had threatened to take up the issue if the Planning Board didn't conclude its deliberations and make a recommendation.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Anne Arundel County police busted up a Glen Burnie massage parlor they said was a front for prostitution activity. After receiving complaints about possible prostitution at a home business publicly advertised as a massage parlor in the 500 block of Glenbrook Road, Anne Arundel County police vice detectives investigated. Using a search warrant, they entered the home on Thursday and found two women inside. Detectives searched the building and discovered "evidence indicating prostitution activity," police said in a statement.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Anne Arundel County police busted up a Glen Burnie massage parlor they said was a front for prostitution activity. After receiving complaints about possible prostitution at a home business publicly advertised as a massage parlor in the 500 block of Glenbrook Road, Anne Arundel County police vice detectives investigated. Using a search warrant, they entered the home on Thursday and found two women inside. Detectives searched the building and discovered "evidence indicating prostitution activity," police said in a statement.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | July 6, 1994
Think of it: no commute to work. The children, pets and house get 24-hour care. When work-related inspiration strikes, no matter the hour of day, you can go to work, for as long or little as you like.Many Americans work like this. According to published sources, an estimated 35 percent of U.S. workers generate some or all of their income from home.Carroll County is no exception. In January, Carol J. Fertitta founded the Home-Based Workers Network from her house in Millers. Within seven months, nearly 300 home businesses have joined.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | August 6, 1991
More and more American workers are investing in a home office. An estimated 20 million households have income-producing home offices this year, compared with 18 million last year and 15 million the prior year.There are many reasons for this work-at-home trend. A million jobs have been lost at the Fortune 100 firms in the past decade. Entrepreneurship is on the rise due to a change in lifestyle goals. In addition, it's no longer financially prohibitive to set up a home office and more people now know how to use the necessary equipment.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | July 22, 1996
NEW YORK -- Are you thinking of starting a business at home? You'll find out fast that making money is your second-biggest challenge. No. 1 is learning how to run a professional shop that customers and clients will respect. That means no barking dogs when clients call, no crying children, no jumping up to take a meatloaf out of the oven."You have to approach a home business as you would an office job," says Sarah Edwards, co-author with her husband, Paul, of "Working From Home" (Tarcher/Putnam, $16.95)
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
Richard Colandrea believes his infirm, elderly tenants are being discriminated against.In the heart of Columbia, on one of the planned city's toniest streets, Mr. Colandrea is engaged in two conflicts.In one, he is fighting with the county government to expand one of two houses on Waterfowl Terrace to accommodate 15 elderly residents, the state limit for such homes. Eight clients live there now.On another front, Mr. Colandrea is battling the Village of Wilde Lake and the Columbia Association, to keep them from shutting down both group homes.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2000
With a portable phone cradled on her shoulder, Jennifer Hutnik moved around the living room of her Columbia home, picking up toys, tossing dolls into their baskets and talking to prospective customers about cat-sitting and hostess services. "I'm always doing several things at once, so it does get hectic," Hutnik said on a recent morning. A former manager for Marriott Management Services, Hutnik left the corporate world about four years ago to open a business that would allow her to stay home with the family she was starting.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Outside what was once a backyard garage, mugs, sponge holders and broad bowls are lined up on tables to dry. A peek inside the structure reveals dozens of butter dishes, teapots, toothbrush holders, bowls of every size, vases, trays and more, all in various stages of production, resting on racks of shelving. And by the windows, with sunlight illuminating their potter's wheels, Nevan Wise is turning brick-sized blobs of clay into pitchers, and her husband, Doug Wise, is shaping clay lumps into kitchen utensil jars.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
James E. Johnston, a retired Navy Department worker who also maintained a home-improvement business, died Sunday of cancer at FutureCare Lochearn. The longtime Northwest Baltimore resident was 88. Born and raised in Roanoke Rapids, N.C., James Eugene Johnston was the son of a seamstress. His father died when he was 5, family members said. After graduating in 1942 from McIver High School in Roanoke Rapids, Mr. Johnston enlisted in the Army. He served as a cook, and after being discharged in 1944, remained an active reservist for six years.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
State and local officials have returned to the Eastern Shore communities ravaged by superstorm Sandy's heavy rains and high winds to comb over the damage in hopes of appealing federal officials' decision to deny aid to Maryland. The Federal Emergency Management Agency declined the state's request for funds for individual residents because the damage was not considered substantial enough. But U.S. Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin, Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration and other state leaders vowed this week to appeal the decision, citing extensive damage to the area, where more than 300 homes are estimated to have been severely damaged.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
Shortly before 4:30 p.m. Monday, Sarah Weber walked out of Binkert's Meat Products in Essex and locked the door behind her - an early departure for the third-generation sausage and deli meats producer. Just down the hill, traffic narrowed and was pushed onto a shoulder as drivers passed a large, muddy hole in Philadelphia Road, surrounded by orange traffic cones and Baltimore public works crews. A 16-inch-wide, city-owned water main burst under the road Monday morning, cutting water to Binkert's and more than a dozen other businesses, 60 homes and two nearby institutions - MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center and the Community College of Baltimore County's Essex campus.
EXPLORE
June 4, 2012
Catonsville home care business named to top 100 in region Linda Cromwell, president and CEO of Catonsville-based Being There Senior Care, was among those selected for the 2012 Top Minority Business Enterprise Award. Cromwell was among the 100 women and minority business owners in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware and the District of Columbia honored during a May 4 ceremony at the University of Maryland University College. She was also among the top 100 women and minority business owners in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware and the District of Columbia for 2009.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
County officials are urging residents to purchase insurance policies if their homes have recently been added to newly redrawn flood insurance rate maps. The Federal Emergency Management Agency worked with Maryland's Department of the Environment to overhaul the statewide maps, which show which homes and businesses are most susceptible to flooding, and thus are generally required to buy flood insurance . In Howard County, the maps have not changed since 1986. Because of better technology, an additional 360 residences and 130 other structures near rivers and streams will be identified as being at risk of flooding, unless their owners appeal.
BUSINESS
By Gail Marksjarvis and Gail Marksjarvis,Chicago Tribune | February 18, 2007
Whether you are a consultant, piano teacher, contractor or sell makeup part time, you might be able to whittle away some of your taxes if you scour your return for deductions. Businesses operated out of the home have some avenues for cutting taxes that aren't available to individuals. And if you aren't set up to tap the benefits fully as you prepare this year's tax return, you can position yourself now so you will keep more of your money next year at tax time. Any expenses for your business in 2006 are deductible - pens and staples, educational expenses, legal fees, bad debts, and business entertainment and travel costs.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 6, 2010
A 55-year-old Howard County man - tentatively diagnosed last year as possibly too psychotic, suicidal and severely depressed to stand trial - pleaded guilty in federal court Friday to arson for setting fire to his Highland home and electronics recycling business on Halloween 2008. According to a statement of facts contained in Scott Daniel Wilson's plea agreement, he jumped into his Jeep after setting the blaze and "narrowly missed hitting a Howard County" firefighter responding to the fire.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Jodi R. Mister, an entrepreneur who established a home cleaning business, died Sunday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of brain trauma after a fall in her Baldwin home. She was 44. Jodi Robyn Holthaus was born in Baltimore and raised in Glen Arm. She was a 1985 graduate of Dulaney High School and attended the University of Maryland, College Park. In 1993, she married David F. Mister, who is a partner in Mister, Winter & Bartlett, a Timonium law firm. About a decade ago, Mrs. Mister opened a home cleaning business.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2011
Water service has been restored around 4 p.m. to about 50 homes and a half-dozen retail businesses in the Nottingham section of Baltimore County. Baltimore Public Works spokesman Kurt Kocher said a broken 12-inch water main was discovered about 5 a.m. Tuesday on the north side of Belair Road between Dunfield Road and Klosterman Avenue. The northbound lanes of Belair Road will remain closed between Dunfield Road and Klosterman Avenue until weather conditions permit resurfacing of the road, he said.
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