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NEWS
By Jennifer Block | July 13, 2008
You'd think the health care establishment would have bigger fish to fry than Ricki Lake. (The 47 million uninsured people in this country, maybe?) But Ms. Lake's recent documentary, The Business of Being Born, which includes footage of her delivery of her second child at home, was on the agenda at the American Medical Association's annual meeting in mid-June. Ms. Lake was name-checked in a "Resolution on Home Deliveries" introduced by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Whereas, there has been much attention in the media by celebrities having home deliveries, with recent Today Show headings such as 'Ricki Lake takes on baby birthing industry.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 1, 2013
Supporters of home births are trying to convince legislators to create a pilot program that could  eventually lead to the licensing of midwives without nursing degrees. The three-year pilot would allow certified professional midwives to deliver babies in a home setting without worry of arrest or prosecution. Certified professional midwives are trained in midwifery and meet standards set by the North American Registry of Midwives. Under the pilot progam, midwives would share their birth outcomes with the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
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NEWS
July 17, 2012
All home births constitute child endangerment and should be outlawed ("Details on midwife unaired in Hopkins malpractice case," July 15). We do not let parents leave young children at home unattended. We demand lifeguards at public swimming pools. Cars must stop for school buses. Infants and children require car seats and seat belts. We all know that our children are usually safe if we do otherwise but want to protect them all of the time, not most of the time. It is ludicrous to deliver babies at home.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
The Maryland Board of Nursing has added a sixth case in its order suspending the license of an Ellicott City nurse midwife for her alleged actions during home births in recent years — including a case in which Johns Hopkins Hospital was ordered to pay one of the largest malpractice judgments in the state. The newest case cited by the board involved an infant whose delivery was aided by Evelyn Muhlhan and who later died. The baby turned blue shortly after birth and died about a month later at a hospital after being removed from an advanced breathing machine, according her mother, who complained to the board.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
The Maryland Board of Nursing has added a sixth case in its order suspending the license of an Ellicott City nurse midwife for her alleged actions during home births in recent years — including a case in which Johns Hopkins Hospital was ordered to pay one of the largest malpractice judgments in the state. The newest case cited by the board involved an infant whose delivery was aided by Evelyn Muhlhan and who later died. The baby turned blue shortly after birth and died about a month later at a hospital after being removed from an advanced breathing machine, according her mother, who complained to the board.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for partly sunny skies with a high temperature around 46 degrees. It is expected to be mostly cloudy tonight with a low temperature around 38 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Same-sex marriage opponents plan Annapolis rally Monday : Pastors and elected officials are set to rally in Annapolis against same-sex marriage Monday evening, aiming to make a strong statement against the bill in advance of this week's senate hearing on the bill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | August 1, 2011
Former Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, who gave birth to three of her four daughters at home, writes about the advantages of home births in The Atlantic. Home births are a less expensive and more personal option for some mothers, she writes. "Each of my home birth experiences was different. The first labor was very long. I took a couple of showers, and when I got hungry, I ate. The third time, I walked around the house, up and down the stairs, made the beds, and even had time to watch The Taming of the Shrew with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 1, 2013
Supporters of home births are trying to convince legislators to create a pilot program that could  eventually lead to the licensing of midwives without nursing degrees. The three-year pilot would allow certified professional midwives to deliver babies in a home setting without worry of arrest or prosecution. Certified professional midwives are trained in midwifery and meet standards set by the North American Registry of Midwives. Under the pilot progam, midwives would share their birth outcomes with the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
More than 500 Maryland moms delivered babies at home last year, but as such births become more popular, a dispute is brewing over whether to make the process a more viable option in the state. Home births are on the rise in the United States with deliveries jumping 29 percent between 2004 and 2009, according to data by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released last week. Maryland home births increased at an even more rapid clip of 62.5 percent. But supporters of home births say that Maryland still places too many restrictions on obtaining a midwife, and they have started a grass roots movement to ease the standards.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | October 1, 1992
When Damon Rutherford thought of his first child being born, he pictured doctors, nurses and a hospital assisting his wife, Debra. He never imagined himself as midwife at the couple's Columbia home.But when Mrs. Rutherford went into labor at 2:40 a.m. Tuesday -- 12 minutes before giving birth to a healthy girl -- he had little choice."We had an entire different picture of what would happen," said Mr. Rutherford, 30, a systems analyst for Johns Hopkins Applied Physics.Mrs. Rutherford, 26, had their first child, Katherine "Katie" Anne, at 2:52 a.m. Tuesday in the family's home on Cross Fox Lane in the Village of Wilde Lake.
NEWS
July 17, 2012
All home births constitute child endangerment and should be outlawed ("Details on midwife unaired in Hopkins malpractice case," July 15). We do not let parents leave young children at home unattended. We demand lifeguards at public swimming pools. Cars must stop for school buses. Infants and children require car seats and seat belts. We all know that our children are usually safe if we do otherwise but want to protect them all of the time, not most of the time. It is ludicrous to deliver babies at home.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for partly sunny skies with a high temperature around 46 degrees. It is expected to be mostly cloudy tonight with a low temperature around 38 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Same-sex marriage opponents plan Annapolis rally Monday : Pastors and elected officials are set to rally in Annapolis against same-sex marriage Monday evening, aiming to make a strong statement against the bill in advance of this week's senate hearing on the bill.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
More than 500 Maryland moms delivered babies at home last year, but as such births become more popular, a dispute is brewing over whether to make the process a more viable option in the state. Home births are on the rise in the United States with deliveries jumping 29 percent between 2004 and 2009, according to data by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released last week. Maryland home births increased at an even more rapid clip of 62.5 percent. But supporters of home births say that Maryland still places too many restrictions on obtaining a midwife, and they have started a grass roots movement to ease the standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | August 1, 2011
Former Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, who gave birth to three of her four daughters at home, writes about the advantages of home births in The Atlantic. Home births are a less expensive and more personal option for some mothers, she writes. "Each of my home birth experiences was different. The first labor was very long. I took a couple of showers, and when I got hungry, I ate. The third time, I walked around the house, up and down the stairs, made the beds, and even had time to watch The Taming of the Shrew with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.
NEWS
By Jennifer Block | July 13, 2008
You'd think the health care establishment would have bigger fish to fry than Ricki Lake. (The 47 million uninsured people in this country, maybe?) But Ms. Lake's recent documentary, The Business of Being Born, which includes footage of her delivery of her second child at home, was on the agenda at the American Medical Association's annual meeting in mid-June. Ms. Lake was name-checked in a "Resolution on Home Deliveries" introduced by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Whereas, there has been much attention in the media by celebrities having home deliveries, with recent Today Show headings such as 'Ricki Lake takes on baby birthing industry.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,Chicago Tribune | November 25, 2007
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- On the surface, nothing about last month's picture-perfect delivery of Linda Kerr seemed amiss. Her mother needed no pain medication. The labor was quick. Excited family members gathered nearby to welcome the newborn into the world. But in Missouri, where the Kerr baby was born in a carefully planned home birth, the experienced midwife hired to oversee the delivery was committing a Class C felony. "Can you imagine that?" asked Jessica Kerr, the mother of the healthy newborn.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,Chicago Tribune | November 25, 2007
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- On the surface, nothing about last month's picture-perfect delivery of Linda Kerr seemed amiss. Her mother needed no pain medication. The labor was quick. Excited family members gathered nearby to welcome the newborn into the world. But in Missouri, where the Kerr baby was born in a carefully planned home birth, the experienced midwife hired to oversee the delivery was committing a Class C felony. "Can you imagine that?" asked Jessica Kerr, the mother of the healthy newborn.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | August 16, 1994
Some 40 residents, including parents and their babies, went to the Carroll County courthouse in Westminster yesterday to lend support to a Pennsylvania midwife charged with practicing nursing without a license.They left after a sheriff's deputy and two Westminster police officers ordered them to move from the courthouse steps because, by standing around and talking, the group was in violation of Westminster's parade and picket ordinance.Many of the same people plan to return to Westminster for the midwife's trial, which was postponed.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | October 1, 1992
When Damon Rutherford thought of his first child being born, he pictured doctors, nurses and a hospital assisting his wife, Debra. He never imagined himself as midwife at the couple's Columbia home.But when Mrs. Rutherford went into labor at 2:40 a.m. Tuesday -- 12 minutes before giving birth to a healthy girl -- he had little choice."We had an entire different picture of what would happen," said Mr. Rutherford, 30, a systems analyst for Johns Hopkins Applied Physics.Mrs. Rutherford, 26, had their first child, Katherine "Katie" Anne, at 2:52 a.m. Tuesday in the family's home on Cross Fox Lane in the Village of Wilde Lake.
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